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I have a base class named CollidableObject and a couple of inherited classes named Player, Enemy, InertObject, etc.

I am trying to find an easy way to iterate through all the instances of them, so I initially created a list of the type CollidableObject and put all the instances of the inherited classes in there.

The thing is that because of the nature of polymorphism, when I do the following

foreach (CollidableObject CollidableObject in collidableObjects)
{
  if (CollidableObject is Player)
  {
    CollidableObject.Draw(spriteBatch, testPlayerTexture); 
  }
  // Then the same prodedure for each type of CollidableObject. 
  // Might change to switch or something.                              
}

The draw method that it calls is the generic Draw method from the CollidbaleObject base, not the overridden/new one from the Player/Enemy/inertObject class.

How do I get around this. Is there a way to iterate through a collection of objects from the same tree but maintaining their inherited type?

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2  
I realize this is ancillary, but it kind of defeats the point if you have to supply the method different arguments for each subtype. Anyway, check out this article about overriding methods; you should have a virtual method and use the override keyword to override it: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ebca9ah3.aspx –  emodendroket Dec 19 '13 at 17:18
1  
"not the overriden/new one from the Player/Enemy/inertObject class." - Which one is it, overriden or new? –  Harrison Dec 19 '13 at 17:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Is there no way to iterate through a collection of objects from the same tree but maintaining their inherited type?

Absolutely, there is a way to do that. However, you need to set up your hierarchy in a proper way:

  • The Draw method in the CollidableObject needs to be marked virtual
  • The Draw method in the Player needs to be marked as an override.

This will ensure that the call from your post would be routed to the Player's override of the method, not to the method of the base.

On a related note, when you see code that checks the dynamic type of an object with the is operator, as in if (CollidableObject is Player), you should get strong suspicions that you are doing something incorrectly. For example, you may be missing a double dispatch.

If all you need to know is the proper texture for the type, you could put textures in a Dictionary<Type,Texture> textureForType, and pull the right one in your loop using the GetType() of the collidable object.

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1  
Thanks! Regarding the thing about the "is" operator, why would it be wrong in this case? –  user3120072 Dec 19 '13 at 17:26
1  
@user3120072 Although using is is not automatically wrong, it's often used in place of a better alternative. For example, rather than checking the dynamic type of the object, you could be calling another virtual method on it that gives you the texture. The danger of using a chain of if (x is TypeXyz) dispatch is that when you add a new type, you must find every place where you have a chain of if (x is ...), and add handling for that new type there. In some cases that's simply a lot of work, but in other cases (when you write a library) it's simply impossible. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 19 '13 at 17:30

Have you tried:

foreach (CollidableObject CollidableObject in collidableObjects)
{
    if (CollidableObject is Player)
    {
        ((Player) CollidableObject).Draw(spriteBatch, testPlayerTexture); 
    }    
    //Then the same prodedure for each type of CollidableObject. Might change to switch or something.                              
}
share|improve this answer
    
This worked, but would I be losing information with this method? –  user3120072 Dec 19 '13 at 17:30
    
@user3120072 - not clear what "information" you are worried about? If you think that (Player) cast creates new object than your assumption is wrong - cast does not create new objects, but rather forces to refer to object as different type (there also will be runtime check to make sure cast is possible). –  Alexei Levenkov Dec 19 '13 at 17:43

I would have each class implement a Draw method that is specific to that class. They would all need the same signature.

Then your foreach doesn't care which class it actually is, and would look like this

foreach (CollidableObject CollidableObject in collidableObjects)
{
      CollidableObject.Draw(....);                                        
}

This would be the "Object Oriented" way of doing it.

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2  
This is what the OP is doing already, but they likely aren't using virtual/override properly, as described in the answer by @dasblinkenlight –  Scampbell Dec 19 '13 at 17:20

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