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From when I learned that the class java.lang.String is declared as final in Java, I was wondering why is that? I didn't find any answer back then, but this post: How to create a replica of String class in Java? reminded me of my query.

Sure, String provides all the functionality I ever needed, and never thought of any operation that would require an extension of class String, but still you'll never know what someone might need!

So, does anyone know what was the intent of the designers when they decided to make it final?

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Thank you all for your answers, especially TrueWill, Bruno Reis and Thilo! I wish I could pick more than one answer as the best one, but unfortunately...! –  Alex Jan 15 '10 at 2:12
    
Also consider the proliferation of "Oh I just need a few more utilty methods on String" projects which would pop up - all of which could not use each others Strings because they were a different class. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Feb 27 '13 at 9:27
    
Thanks for this reply its very useful. we've two facts now. A String is a Final class & its immutable because it can't be changed but can be referred to another object. but what about:- String a = new String("test1"); then, s = "test2"; If String is Final class object then how can it be modified ? How can i use modified final object. Please let me if i wrongly asked anything. –  Suresh Sharma Apr 9 '13 at 6:37
    
You can view this good article. –  Aniket Thakur Jan 10 at 12:00

11 Answers 11

up vote 55 down vote accepted

It is very useful to have strings implemented as immutable objects. You should read about immutability to understand more about it.

One advantage of immutable objects is that

You can share duplicates by pointing them to a single instance.

(from here).

If String were not final, you could create a subclass and have two strings that look alike when "seen as Strings", but that are actually different.

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33  
Unless there's a connection between final classes and immutable objects that I'm not seeing, I don't see how your answer relates to the question. –  sepp2k Jan 15 '10 at 1:21
7  
Because if it's not final you can pass a StringChild to some method as a String param, and it could be mutable (because a child class state change). –  helios Jan 15 '10 at 1:23
2  
And because you cannot override (being final) hashCode, intern and equal methods that are fundamental for all the class-library. –  helios Jan 15 '10 at 1:24
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Wow! Downvotes? Don't you understand how subclassing relates to immutability? I'd appreciate an explanation on what's the problem. –  Bruno Reis Jan 15 '10 at 1:25
3  
@Bruno, re: downvotes: I did not downvote you, but you could add a sentence as to how preventing subclasses enforces immutability. Right now, it is kind of a half-answer. –  Thilo Jan 15 '10 at 1:29

This is a nice article that outlines two reasons already mentioned on the above answers:

  1. Security: the system can hand out sensitive bits of read-only information without worrying that they will be altered
  2. Performance: immutable data is very useful in making things thread-safe.

And this probably is the most detailed comment in that article. Its has to do with the string pool in Java and security issues. Its about how to decide what goes into the string pool. Assuming both strings are equal if their sequence of characters are the same, then we have a race condition on who gets there first and along with it security issues. If not, then the string pool will contain redundant strings thus losing the advantage of having it in the first place. Just read it out for yourself, will ya?


Extending String would play havoc with equals and intern. JavaDoc says equals:

Compares this string to the specified object. The result is true if and only if the argument is not null and is a String object that represents the same sequence of characters as this object.

Assuming java.lang.String wasn't final, a SafeString could equal a String, and vice versa; because they'd represent the same sequence of characters.

What would happen if you applied intern to a SafeString -- would the SafeString go into the JVM's string pool? The ClassLoader and all objects the SafeString held references to would then get locked in place for the lifetime of the JVM. You'd get a race condition about who could be the first to intern a sequence of characters -- maybe your SafeString would win, maybe a String, or maybe a SafeString loaded by a different classloader (thus a different class).

If you won the race into the pool, this would be a true singleton and people could access your whole environment (sandbox) through reflection and secretKey.intern().getClass().getClassLoader().

Or the JVM could block this hole by making sure that only concrete String objects (and no subclasses) were added to the pool.

If equals was implemented such that SafeString != String then SafeString.intern != String.intern, and SafeString would have to be added to the pool. The pool would then become a pool of <Class, String> instead of <String> and all you'd need to enter the pool would be a fresh classloader.

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The absolutely most important reason that String is immutable or final is that it is used by the class loading mechanism, and thus have profound and fundamental security aspects.

Had String been mutable or not final, a request to load "java.io.Writer" could have been changed to load "mil.vogoon.DiskErasingWriter"

reference : Why String is immutable in Java

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String is a very core class in Java, many things rely on it working a certain way, for example being immutable.

Making the class final prevents subclasses that could break these assumptions.

Note that, even now, if you use reflection, you can break Strings (change their value or hashcode). Reflection can be stopped with a security manager. If String was not final, everyone could do it.

Other classes that are not declared final allow you to define somewhat broken subclasses (you could have a List that adds to the wrong position, for example) but at least the JVM does not depend on those for its core operations.

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5  
final on a class does not guarantee immutability. It just guarantees that a class's invariants (one of which can be immutability) cannot be changed by a sub-class. –  Kevin Brock Jan 15 '10 at 1:59
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@Kevin: yes. Final on a class guarantees that there are no subclasses. Has nothing to do with immutability. –  Thilo Jan 15 '10 at 2:27
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Making a class final does not, of itself, make it immuatable. But making an immutable class final insures that no one makes a subclass that breaks immutability. Perhaps the people making the point about immutability were unclear in exactly what they meant, but their statements are correct when understood in context. –  Jay Jan 28 '11 at 21:20

As Bruno said it's about immutability. It's not only about Strings but as well about any wrappers e.g. Double, Integer, Character, etc. There are many reasons for this:

  • Thread safety
  • Security
  • Heap that is managed by Java itself (differently to ordinary heap that is Garbage Collected in different manner)
  • Memory management

Basically it so you, as a programmer, can be sure that your string will never be changed. It as well, if you know how it works, can improve memory managemnt. Try to create two identical string one after another, for example "hello". You will notice, if you debug, that they have identical IDs, that means that they are exactly THE SAME objects. This is due to the fact that Java let's you do it. This wouldn't be posssible if the strings were muttable. They can have the same I'd, etc., because they will never change. So if you ever decide to create 1,000,000 string "hello" what you'd really do is create 1,000,000 pointers to "hello". As well alling any function on string, or any wrappers for that reason, would result in creating another object (again look at object ID - it will change).

Aditionally final in Java does not necessarily mean that object cannot change (it is different to for example C++). It means that the address to which it points cannot change, but you still can change it's properties and/or attributes. So understanding the difference between immutability and final in some case might be really important.

HTH

References:

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I do not believe that Strings go to a different heap or use a different memory management. They are certainly garbage collectable. –  Thilo Jan 15 '10 at 1:42
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Also, the final keyword on a class is completely different from the final keyword for a field. –  Thilo Jan 15 '10 at 1:47
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Okay, on Sun's JVM, Strings that are intern()ed may go into the perm-gen, which is not part of the heap. But that definitely does not happen for all Strings, or all JVM. –  Thilo Jan 15 '10 at 1:51
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Not all Strings go to that area, just the Strings that have been interned. Interning is automatic for literal Strings. (@Thilo, typing as you submitted your comment). –  Kevin Brock Jan 15 '10 at 1:55
    
Thanks for this reply its very useful. we've two facts now. A String is a Final class & its immutable because it can't be changed but can be referred to another object. but what about:- String a = new String("test1"); then, s = "test2"; If String is Final class object then how can it be modified ? How can i use modified final object. Please let me if i wrongly asked anything. –  Suresh Sharma Apr 9 '13 at 7:11

The String class is the only class that has an "overloaded" operator, namely the + operator. Allowing programmers to subclass String, would allow them (and most likely tempt them) to do ugly hacks to exploit this:

class MyComplex extends String { ... }

MyComplex a = new MyComplex("5+3i");
MyComplex b = new MyComplex("7+4i");
MyComplex c = new MyComplex(a + b);   // works, since a and b are strings,
                                      // and a string + a string is a string.
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It may have been to simplify implementation. If you design a class that will be inheritable by users of the class, then you have a whole new set of use cases to consider into your design. What happens if they do this or that with X proptected field? Making it final they can focus on getting the public interface working correctly and make sure it's solid.

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+1 for "designing for inheritance is hard". BTW, that's very nicely explained in Bloch's "Effective Java". –  sleske Apr 29 '10 at 8:55

Well, I have some different thought I am not sure whether I am correct or not but in Java String is the only object which can be treated as a primitive data type as well I mean we can create a String object as String name="java". Now like others primitive datatypes which are copy by value not copy by reference String is expected to have same behavior so thats why String is final. Thats what my thought it. Please ignore if its completely illogical.

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In my opinion String never behaves like a primitive type. A string literal like "java" is actually an object of the String class (you can use the dot operator on it, immediately following the closing quote). So assigning a literal to a string variable is just assigning object references as usual. What is different is that the String class has language-level support built into the compiler... turning things in double quotes into String objects, and the + operator as mentioned above. –  Georgie Jan 17 at 22:41

To make sure we do not get a better implementation. It should of course have been an interface.

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The finality of strings also defends them as a standard. In C++ you can create subclasses of string, so every programming shop could have its own version of string. This would lead to a lack of a strong standard.

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With a lot of good points already mentined I would like to add another one -one of the reason of Why String is immutable in Java is to allow String to cache its hashcode , being immutable String in Java caches its hashcode, and do not calculate every time we call hashcode method of String, which makes it very fast as hashmap key to be used in hashmap in Java.

In short because String is immutable, no one can change its contents once created which guarantees hashCode of String to be same on multiple invocation.

If you see String class has is declared as

/** Cache the hash code for the string */
private int hash; // Default to 0

and hashcode() function is as follows -

public int hashCode() {
    int h = hash;
    if (h == 0 && value.length > 0) {
        char val[] = value;

        for (int i = 0; i < value.length; i++) {
            h = 31 * h + val[i];
        }
        hash = h;
    }
    return h;
}

If it is already computer just return the value.

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