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I am very new to DDD and reading various discussions on validation (where to put it) on the stackoverflow as well as on the web. I do like the idea of keeping the validations outside the entities and validate them depending upon the context. In our project, we have an entity called MedicalRecord and there are various rules for when one can be created or can be saved. I want to create a service layer, let's say RecordService, that would do some check to make sure if a user can create a medical record before creating one. I also want to create MedicalRecordRepository that would save the medical record. What confuses me is the access modifies on my entity and repository classes. Since both will be public, how can I enforce the client of my application to use the service instead of just creating new medical record (with public constructor) and use the repository to save it? I am using c#. I know DDD is language independent but wondering if someone could provide some thoughts on this.

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You must control record creation by making the c'tor non-public and allowing creation only through a factory:

public class MedicalRecord
{
    internal MedicalRecord()
    {
    }
}

public static class MedicalRecordFactory
{
    public static MedicalRecord Create(User onBehalfOf)
    {
        // do logic here
        return new MedicalRecord();
    }
}

For the internal keyword to be applicable, either both classes must be in the same assembly or the class assembly must allow the factory assembly access with the InternalsVisibleTo attribute.

Edit

If you need to be able to perform validation at any time, you additionally have to encapsulate validation logic in another class (here partially done via an extension method):

public static class MedicalRecordValidator
{
    public static bool IsValid(this MedicalRecord medicalRecord, <context>)
    {
        return IsValid(<context>);
    }

    public static bool IsValidForCreation(User onBehalfOf)
    {
        return IsValid(null, onBehalfOf);
    }

    private static bool IsValid(<context> context, User user = null)
    {
        // do validation logic here
    }
}

then, the factory could do this:

public static MedicalRecord Create(User onBehalfOf)
{
    return IsValidForCreation(onBehalfOf) ? new MedicalRecord() : null;
}

and you could also always do this:

if (myMedicalRecord.IsValid(<context>))
{
    // ....
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+1, this is a good approach for the creation part of the question, but it does not address the part of "validating" the entities using contextual information. –  Marijn Dec 20 '13 at 9:10
    
It does address this part, too. Look at the onBehalfOf argument of the factory method (or maybe other pieces of information than userinfo may be required - but the approach will always follow the same scheme). –  Thomas Weller Dec 20 '13 at 9:14
    
Yes, but only for the case of creation and not during other parts of the life cycle of the MedicalRecord. I interpreted the creation part in the question as an example of the larger question of using contextual information for "validation". –  Marijn Dec 20 '13 at 9:36
    
That's obviously right. See my edited answer for this. –  Thomas Weller Dec 20 '13 at 9:54
1  
You can have something that is valid in the Business domain and you're not allowed to save it? Sounds strange. Anyway, in this case you would simply have two Validator classes - one for the Business Layer and one for the Persistence layer. The repository class then would invoke its Validator for saving just like the factory does for creating. –  Thomas Weller Dec 20 '13 at 15:49

Only use your repository to retrieve your entities; not to save them. Saving (persisting) your entities is the responsibility of your unit of work.

You let your service change one or more entities (for instance a MedicalRecord) and track the changes in a unit of work. Before committing the changes in your unit of work, you can validate all entities for validation needs across entities. Then you commit your unit of work (in a single transaction), which will persist all your changes, or none at all.

For clarity, your MedicalRecord should protect its own invariants; such that a client retrieving a MedicalRecord using a repository, calling some methods to modify it and then persisting it using a unit of work, should result in a "valid" system state. If there are situations where this is not the case, then it can be argued that it should not be possible to retrieve a MedicalRecord on its own - it is part of some larger concept.

For creation purposes, using a factory like @Thomas suggests below is a good approach, although I think I'd call it a service (because of the collaboration between entities) instead of a factory. What I like about Thomas' approach is that it does not allow a client to create a MedicalRecord without a User (or other contextual information), without tying the MedicalRecord tightly to the user.

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