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I am just trying to read each character of the file and print it out but when the file finishes reading, but I am getting a bunch of ? after it finishes reading. How do I fix it?

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void){
    FILE *fr;            /* declare the file pointer */

    fr = fopen ("some.txt", "r");  /* open the file for reading */
        /* elapsed.dta is the name of the file */
        /* "rt" means open the file for reading text */
    char c;
    while((c = getc(fr)) != NULL)
    {
        printf("%c", c);
    }
    fclose(fr);  /* close the file prior to exiting the routine */
    /*of main*/ 


    return 0;
}
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Have you tried compiling with all warnings enabled? I have a feeling your while loop conditional is the problem, but I'm not sure. If it's what I'm thinking it might be, a warning will come up if you compile with all warnings enabled. –  Platinum Azure Jan 15 '10 at 4:01
    
Everything you need to know about FILE is here: cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/FILE –  Phong Jan 15 '10 at 4:26
    
You should be more careful about the return type of getc(), and also realize that NULL is a pointer. –  Alok Singhal Jan 15 '10 at 5:21

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In spite of its name, getc returns an int, not a char, so that it can represent all of the possible char values and, in addition, EOF (end of file). If getc returned a char, there would be no way to indicate the end of file without using one of the values that could possibly be in the file.

So, to fix your code, you must first change the declaration char c; to int c; so that it can hold the EOF marker when it is returned. Then, you must also change the while loop condition to check for EOF instead of NULL.

You could also call feof(fr) to test end of file separately from reading the character. If you did that, you could leave c as a char, but you would have to call feof() after you read the character but before you printed it out, and use a break to get out of the loop.

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2  
Just be careful when using feof: c-faq.com/stdio/feof.html –  jamesdlin Jan 15 '10 at 4:39
    
@jamesdlin: Thanks for the warning. –  benzado Jan 15 '10 at 4:53
1  
Nit: in C, plain char can be signed or unsigned. Your statement above is true when char is unsigned, but if char is signed, it may be able to represent EOF. Typically, EOF is a small negative constant (-1 for example), and that's easily represented in a signed char. –  Alok Singhal Jan 15 '10 at 5:18
    
Exactly. The only way to reliably and portably test for EOF is by using feof. –  ephemient Jan 15 '10 at 5:31
    
@Alok: I don't see what it has to do with char itself being signed or not; getc returns the character as an unsigned char converted to int. You indeed would have the EOF collision if sizeof(int) == 1, however. –  jamesdlin Jan 15 '10 at 5:45

If unsuccessful, fgetc() returns EOF.

int c;
while ((c = getc(fr)) != EOF) 
{ 
    printf("%c", c); 
}
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c needs to be declared as an int as well. –  Emerick Rogul Jan 15 '10 at 4:07
    
@Emerick Rogul: do you want that comment under the original question? –  Mitch Wheat Jan 15 '10 at 4:10

fgetc() returns EOF on end-of-file, not NULL.

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Replace "NULL" with "EOF".

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Others have already addressed the issue you're having, but rather than using printf("%c", c); it is probably much more efficient to use putchar(c);. There is quite a bit of overhead involved when you ask printf to print just one character.

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True, but the same holds for using fgetc instead of fgets or fscanf. –  Dan Breslau Jan 15 '10 at 4:14
    
Also, SuperString is trying to learn C. The infinitesimal amount of overhead is not important at this point, and learning how to use printf is more useful in general than putchar. Since this isn't an answer to the question, you should have left a comment. –  benzado Jan 15 '10 at 4:21
1  
Using getc with putchar makes more sense since one is intended to read one character from stdin, and the other is intended to output one character to stdout. –  dreamlax Jan 15 '10 at 4:24
1  
Even if efficiency were a concern (which it's not), this program would definitely be I/O-bound, not CPU-bound, so the difference between printf and putchar is negligibl. –  Adam Rosenfield Jan 15 '10 at 4:31
1  
Yes you're quite right. However, I still think putchar is a better choice of function given the situation. –  dreamlax Jan 15 '10 at 4:52

getc returns an int.

change char c, to int c.

also getc returns EOF, change your test against NULL to a test against EOF

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Change this

char c;
while((c = getc(fr)) != NULL)
{
    printf("%c", c);
}

to

char c;
int charAsInt;
while((charAsInt = getc(fr)) != EOF)
{
     c = (char) charAsInt;
     printf("%c", c);
}

In other words: You need to compare against EOF, not NULL. You also need to use an int variable to receive the return value from fgetc. If you use a char, the comparison with EOF may fail, and you'll be back where you started.

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Many other functions expect type int even though they typically only operate within the range of char. putchar, isdigit, strchr etc. –  dreamlax Jan 15 '10 at 4:11

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