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I was just going through some basic stuff as I am learning C. I came upon a question to multiply a number by 7 without using * operator. Basically its like this

      (x<<3)-x;

Now I know about basic bit manipulation operations, but I can't get how do you multiply a number by any other odd number without using * operator? Is there any general algorithm for this?

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7  
that's (8*x)-x or IOW 7x –  Anurag Jan 15 '10 at 4:23
2  
Note that most compilers already optimize things like this. I.e., turning 15*x into ((x<<4)-x)) –  e.tadeu Jan 15 '10 at 18:01
2  
Algebra :) - (x << 3) - x = 8 * x - x = (8 - 1) * x = 7 * x The trick is that x << 3 == x * 2^3 == 8 –  vicatcu Jan 15 '10 at 18:22
1  
Just use the * operator; that's what it's for. This is nearly a duplicate of this question. Note that (x<<3) - x can overflow for some values of x where the simpler and clearer x * 7 won't. –  Keith Thompson Dec 29 '11 at 2:49
    
Shift and add, shift and add, shift and add.... –  Hot Licks Mar 21 at 1:48
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27 Answers

Think about how you multiply in decimal using pencil and paper:

  12
x 26
----
  72
 24
----
 312

What does multiplication look like in binary?

   0111
x  0101
-------
   0111
  0000
 0111
-------
 100011

Notice anything? Unlike multiplication in decimal, where you need to memorize the "times table," when multiplying in binary, you are always multiplying one of the terms by either 0 or 1 before writing it down in the list addends. There's no times table needed. If the digit of the second term is 1, you add in the first term. If it's 0, you don't. Also note how the addends are progressively shifted over to the left.

If you're unsure of this, do a few binary multiplications on paper. When you're done, convert the result back to decimal and see if it's correct. After you've done a few, I think you'll get the idea how binary multiplication can be implemented using shifts and adds.

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Everyone is overlooking the obvious. no multiplication involved.

10^(log10(A) + log10(B))
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2  
Which in C would be exp(log(A) + log(B)). –  David R Tribble Jan 15 '10 at 20:54
    
I suppose you're being sarcastic, but if you're not, have you ever looked at source code for logn? –  Arthur Kalliokoski Feb 10 '10 at 7:10
5  
I looked at it as more of a history lesson then being sarcastic. People today tend to forget we did do thing before we had computers or even electronic calculators. I've seen to many engineers and programs who accept the result from the "magic box" without understanding how it works. No one can know everything, but we should understand as much as we can. I know the general algorithm for computing logs, but I admit I have not studied them in great depth. They od involve shifting which is multiplying in binary as many people have pointed out. Not unexpected, early CPUS can only add and shift. –  Jim C Feb 10 '10 at 21:15
    
Even many modern CPUs (small, low-power ones) can't multiply or divide. Why waste microcode on that when it can easily be done in software? –  Artelius Jun 23 '10 at 4:23
    
The old slide rule implementation! Gotta love the scene in Apollo 13 where 10 engineers are simultaneously doing a calculation on their slide rules - multi-core at its infancy! –  franji1 Sep 16 '10 at 2:33
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An integer left shift is multiplying by 2, provided it doesn't overflow. Just add or subtract as appropriate once you get close.

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int multiply(int multiplicand, int factor)
{
    if (factor == 0) return 0;

    for (int ii = 1; ii < abs(factor); ++ii) {
        multiplicand += multiplicand;
    }

    return factor >= 0 ? multiplicand : -multiplicand;
}

You wanted multiplication without *, you got it, pal!

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Wow, thanks dkantowitz. I had no idea! +10 to you my good man! (oh, and nothing in the question necessitates bit shifting, but I'm sure you realized that too.) –  user123456 Feb 10 '10 at 13:56
6  
-1. This code is broken since instead of adding multiplicand to a running sum (initially 0), it adds multiplicand to itself, which results in a multiplication of multiplicand by 2^(abs(factor)-1)*sgn(factor) instead of by factor. –  Alexey Frunze Dec 29 '11 at 1:56
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The question says:

multiply a number by 7 without using * operator

This doesn't use *:

 number / (1 / 7) 

Edit:
This compiles and works fine in C:

 int number,result;
 number = 8;
 result = number / (1. / 7);
 printf("result is %d\n",result);
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+1 for the idea, but it won't work in Java: java.lang.ArithmeticException: / by zero since (1 / 7) is done by integer division (workaround is easy) –  Carlos Heuberger Jan 15 '10 at 15:59
    
actually it won't work in c either! I'm pretty sure you'd get a core dump if you ran that line :). –  vicatcu Jan 15 '10 at 18:19
1  
@vicatcu - Tested in gcc, it works ( . are cheap :) –  Carlos Gutiérrez Jan 15 '10 at 19:20
1  
@Chris Dodd, AndreyT - True, FP can byte you. My point is the idea, not the implementation. –  Carlos Gutiérrez Jan 15 '10 at 20:03
1  
@Loadmaster: You don't need an explicit cast to convert double to int. This is a standard conversion in both C and C++, so no cast is needed. The only reason people might use an explicit cast is to suppress some annoying compiler warnings. –  AndreyT Jan 15 '10 at 23:03
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It's easy to avoid the '*' operator:

mov eax, 1234h
mov edx, 5678h
imul edx

No '*' in sight. Of course, if you wanted to get into the spirit of the it, you can also use the trusty old shift and add algorithm:

mult proc
; multiplies eax by ebx and places result in edx:ecx
    xor ecx, ecx
    xor edx, edx
mul1:
    test ebx, 1
    jz  mul2
    add ecx, eax
    adc edx, 0
mul2:
    shr ebx, 1
    shl eax, 1
    test ebx, ebx
    jnz  mul1
done:
    ret
mult endp

Of course, with modern processors all (?) have multiplication instructions, but back when the PDP-11 was shiny and new, code like this saw real use.

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6  
That's not fair, the question is tagged c, c++, and java ;) –  dreamlax Jan 15 '10 at 5:42
9  
@dreamlax: Quite true -- and if somebody reverse engineers the algorithm from assembly code to get an A on their C, C++ or Java homework, I'm willing to believe they probably earned the grade... –  Jerry Coffin Jan 15 '10 at 5:47
    
My first home computer was a TRS-80, sporting a zippy 1.7MHz Z80, and I typed in a lot of multiplication routines like this. Turned out the fastest way was to do as many 8x16 bit multiplications as necessary, and add them up. –  David Thornley Jan 15 '10 at 15:11
    
Gotta love x86's LEA instruction... shift and add in a single instruction :) –  ephemient Jan 15 '10 at 17:25
    
Even many modern CPUs (small, low-power ones) can't multiply or divide. Why waste microcode on that when it can easily be done in software? –  Artelius Jun 23 '10 at 4:25
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It is the same as x*8-x = x*(8-1) = x*7

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Mathematically speaking, multiplication distributes over addition. Essentially, this means:

x * (a + b + c ...) = (x * a) + (x * b) + (x * c) ...

Any real number (in your case 7), can be presented as a series of additions (such as 8 + (-1), since subtraction is really just addition going the wrong way). This allows you to represent any single multiplication statement as an equivalent series of multiplication statements, which will come up with the same result:

x * 7
= x * (8 + (-1))
= (x * 8) + (x * (-1))
= (x * 8) - (x * 1)
= (x * 8) - x

The bitwise shift operator essentially just multiplies or divides a number by a power of 2. So long as your equation is only dealing with such values, bit shifting can be used to replace all occurances of multiplication operator.

(x * 8) - x = (x * 23) - x = (x << 3) - x

A similar strategy can be used on any other integer, and it makes no difference whether it's odd or even.

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Any number, odd or even, can be expressed as a sum of powers of two. For example,

     1   2   4   8
------------------
 1 = 1
 2 = 0 + 2
 3 = 1 + 2
 4 = 0 + 0 + 4
 5 = 1 + 0 + 4
 6 = 0 + 2 + 4
 7 = 1 + 2 + 4
 8 = 0 + 0 + 0 + 8
11 = 1 + 2 + 0 + 8

So, you can multiply x by any number by performing the right set of shifts and adds.

 1x = x
 2x = 0 + x<<1
 3x = x + x<<1
 4x = 0 +  0   + x<<2
 5x = x +  0   + x<<2
11x = x + x<<1 +   0  + x<<3
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Useful! But how about scenarios similar to the OP's, such as multiplying by shifting and subtracting too? i.e. 6x = (x << 3) - (x << 1) etc? –  dreamlax Jan 15 '10 at 4:58
    
I thought the only rule was to avoid the * operator. –  benzado Jan 15 '10 at 5:05
1  
Also, your table is a little out, 2x is (x << 1), and 4x is (x << 2) etc. –  dreamlax Jan 15 '10 at 5:05
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When it comes down to it, multiplication by a positive integer can be done like this:

int multiply(int a, int b) {
  int ret = 0;
  for (int i=0; i<b; i++) {
    ret += b;
  }
  return ret;
}

Efficient? Hardly. But it's correct (factoring in limits on ints and so forth).

So using a left-shift is just a shortcut for multiplying by 2. But once you get to the highest power-of-2 under b you just add a the necessary number of times, so:

int multiply(int a, int b) {
  int ret = a;
  int mult = 1;
  while (mult <= b) {
    ret <<= 1;
    mult <<= 1;
  }
  while (mult < b) {
    ret += a;
  }
  return ret;
}

or something close to that.

To put it another way, to multiply by 7.

  • Left shift by 2 (times 4). Left shift 3 is 8 which is >7;
  • Add b 3 times.
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3  
In your first example, you either mean: ret += a; or i < a. You should mention that it assumes non-negatives integers in the "and so forth". –  jamesdlin Jan 15 '10 at 4:27
    
I dont get it....What do we add 3 times?? Like if the the number is 7 to be mulitplied by 7, like I wrote, it is left shift by 3 and subtract 7, the result is 49. What exactly is b? Pardon my lack of knowledge. –  Race Jan 15 '10 at 4:37
    
Left shit? Tehehehe –  bsneeze Jan 15 '10 at 4:38
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unsigned int Multiply(unsigned int m1, unsigned int m2)
{
    unsigned int numBits = sizeof(unsigned int) * 8; // Not part of the core algorithm
    unsigned int product = 0;
    unsigned int mask = 1;
    for(int i =0; i < numBits; ++i, mask = mask << 1)
    {
        if(m1 & mask)
        {
            product += (m2 << i);
        }
    }
    return product;
}
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1  
-1: code assumes 8 bits in a byte. –  benzado Jan 15 '10 at 5:06
1  
Rather than using * 8 you could just use << 3 :) –  dreamlax Jan 15 '10 at 5:07
2  
Or use CHAR_BIT –  LiraNuna Jan 15 '10 at 5:21
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import java.math.BigInteger;

public class MultiplyTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        BigInteger bigInt1 = new BigInteger("5");
        BigInteger bigInt2 = new BigInteger("8");
        System.out.println(bigInt1.multiply(bigInt2));
    }
}
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please format your code next time –  Sean Patrick Floyd Sep 15 '10 at 13:46
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@Wang, that's a good generalization. But here is a slightly faster version. But it assumes no overflow and a is non-negative.

int mult(int a, int b){
    int p=1;
    int rv=0;
    for(int i=0; a >= p && i < 31; i++){
        if(a & p){
            rv += b;
        }
        p = p << 1;
        b = b << 1;
    }

    return rv;
}

It will loop at most 1+log_2(a) times. Could be faster if you swap a and b when a > b.

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One evening, I found that I was extremely bored, and cooked this up:

#include <iostream>

typedef unsigned int uint32;

uint32 add(uint32 a, uint32 b) {
    do {
        uint32 s = a ^ b;
        uint32 c = a & b;
        a = s;
        b = c << 1;
    } while (a & b)
    return (a | b)
}

uint32 mul(uint32 a, uint32 b) {
    uint32 total = 0;
    do {
        uint32 s1 = a & (-(b & 1))
        b >>= 1; a <<= 1;
        total = add(s1, total)
    } while (b)
    return total;
}

int main(void) {
    using namespace std;
    uint32 a, b;

    cout << "Enter two numbers to be multiplied: ";
    cin >> a >> b;

    cout << "Total: " << mul(a,b) << endl;
    return 0;
}

The code above should be quite self-explanatory, as I tried to keep it as simple as possible. It should work, more or less, the way a CPU might perform these operations. The only bug I'm aware of is that a is not permitted to be greater than 32,767 and b is not permitted to be large enough to overflow a (that is, multiply overflow is not handled, so 64-bit results are not possible). It should even work with negative numbers, provided the inputs are appropriately reinterpret_cast<>.

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unsigned int Multiply( unsigned int a, unsigned int b )
{
    int ret = 0;
    // For each bit in b
    for ( int i=0; i<32; i++ ) {
        // if that bit is not equal to zero
        if ( ( b & (1 << i) ) != 0 ) {
            // add it to our return value
            ret += a << i;
        }
    }
    return ret;
}

Avoided the sign bit because its kind not the subject of the post. This is an implementation of what Wayne Conrad said basically. Here is another problem is you want to try more low level math operations. Project Euler is cool!

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Another thinking-outside-the-box answer:

BigDecimal a = new BigDecimal(123);
BigDecimal b = new BigDecimal(2);
BigDecimal result = a.multiply(b);
System.out.println(result.intValue());
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How does this work in "C"? I think you may have misread the original question. –  S.Robins Jan 15 '10 at 7:07
    
@S.Robins: use libgmp for exapmle. mpz_mul (mpz_t rop, mpz_t op1, mpz_t op2) –  Tadeusz A. Kadłubowski Jan 15 '10 at 7:24
    
Good point, I guess I'm seeing the world through java colored glasses. –  igor Jan 15 '10 at 11:03
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private static string Multi(int a, int b) {

if (a == 0 || b == 0)
    return "0";

bool isnegative = false;

if (a < 0 || b < 0)
{
    isnegative = true;

    a = Math.Abs(a);

    b = Math.Abs(b);
}

int sum = 0;

if (a > b)
{
    for (int i = 1; i <= b; i++)
    {
        sum += a;
    }
}
else
{
    for (int i = 1; i <= a; i++)
    {
        sum += b;
    }
}

if (isnegative == true)
    return "-" + sum.ToString();
else
    return sum.ToString();

}

-----in C#

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Why not just loop it? Run a loop 7 times and iterate by the number you are multiplying with 7

pseudo code

total = 0
multiply = 34

loop while i < 7

total = total + multiply

endloop
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public static final long multiplyUsingLogs(int a, int b) {
    int absA = Math.abs(a);
    int absB = Math.abs(b);
    long result = Math.round(Math.pow(10, (Math.log10(absA)+Math.log10(absB))));
    return (a>0&&b>0 || a<0&&b<0)?result:-result;
}
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If you can use the log function:

public static final long multiplyUsingShift(int a, int b) {
    int absA = Math.abs(a);
    int absB = Math.abs(b);

    //Find the 2^b which is larger than "a" which turns out to be the 
    //ceiling of (Log base 2 of b) == numbers of digits to shift
    double logBase2 = Math.log(absB) / Math.log(2);
    long bits = (long)Math.ceil(logBase2);

    //Get the value of 2^bits
    long biggerInteger = (int)Math.pow(2, bits);

    //Find the difference of the bigger integer and "b"
    long difference = biggerInteger - absB;

    //Shift "bits" places to the left
    long result = absA<<bits;

    //Subtract the "difference" "a" times
    int diffLoop = Math.abs(a);
    while (diffLoop>0) {
        result -= difference;
        diffLoop--;
    }

    return (a>0&&b>0 || a<0&&b<0)?result:-result;
}

If you cannot use the log function:

public static final long multiplyUsingShift(int a, int b) {
    int absA = Math.abs(a);
    int absB = Math.abs(b);

    //Get the number of bits for a 2^(b+1) larger number
    int bits = 0;
    int bitInteger = absB;
    while (bitInteger>0) {
        bitInteger /= 2;
        bits++;
    }

    //Get the value of 2^bit
    long biggerInteger = (int)Math.pow(2, bits);

    //Find the difference of the bigger integer and "b"
    long difference = biggerInteger - absB;

    //Shift "bits" places to the left
    long result = absA<<bits;

    //Subtract the "difference" "a" times
    int diffLoop = absA;
    while (diffLoop>0) {
        result -= difference;
        diffLoop--;
    }

    return (a>0&&b>0 || a<0&&b<0)?result:-result;
}
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I found this to be more efficient:

public static final long multiplyUsingShift(int a, int b) {
    int absA = Math.abs(a);
    int absB = Math.abs(b);

    long result = 0L;
    while (absA>0) {
        if ((absA&1)>0) result += absB; //Is odd
        absA >>= 1;
        absB <<= 1;
    }

    return (a>0&&b>0 || a<0&&b<0)?result:-result;
}
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package com.amit.string;
  // here i am passing two value 7 and 3 and  method getResult() will return 21 without use of any operator except increment operator ++.                                       
public class MultiplyTwoNumber {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int a = 7;
        int b = 3;
        System.out.println(new MultiplyTwoNumber().getResult(a, b));
    }

    public int getResult(int i, int j) {
        int result = 0;
     //check for loop logic it is key thing it will go 21 times 
        for (int k = 0; k < i; k++) {
            for (int p = 0; p < j; p++) {
                result++;
            }
        }
        return result;
    }
}
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Rather than only post a block of code, please explain why this code solves the problem posed. Without an explanation, this is not an answer. –  Martijn Pieters Dec 7 '12 at 22:08
    
And please be careful about the indentation of code. If the posted code is hard to read then it is lesser helpful. –  Gabor Garami Dec 7 '12 at 22:10
    
i hope you guys got answer .... if you have doubt please mail me it.amitkumar@yahoo.com –  Amit Sinha Dec 10 '12 at 11:40
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public static int multiply(int a, int b) 
{
    int temp = 0;
    if (b == 0) return 0;
    for (int ii = 0; ii < abs(b); ++ii) {
        temp = temp + a;
    }

    return b >= 0 ? temp : -temp;
}

public static int abs(int val) {

    return val>=0 ? val : -val;
}
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Shift and add doesn't work (even with sign extension) when the multiplicand is negative. Signed multiplication has to be done using Booth encoding:

Starting from the lsb, a change from 0 to 1 is -1; a change from 1 to 0 is 1, otherwise 0. There is also an implicit extra bit 0 below the lsb.

For example, the number 5 (0101) will be encoded as: (1)(-1)(1)(-1) You can verify this is correct:

5 = 2^3 - 2^2 + 2 -1

This algorithm also works with negative numbers in 2's complement form:

-1 in 4-bit 2's complement is 1111. Using the Booth algorithm: (1)(0)(0)(0)(-1), where there is no space for the leftmost bit 1 so we get: (0)(0)(0)(-1) which is -1.

/* Multiply two signed integers using the Booth algorithm */
int booth(int x, int y)
{
    int prev_bit = 0;
    int result = 0;

    while (x != 0) {
        int current_bit = x & 0x1;
        if (prev_bit & ~current_bit) {
            result += y; 
        } else if (~prev_bit & current_bit) {
            result -= y;
        }

        prev_bit = current_bit;

        x = static_cast<unsigned>(x) >> 1;
        y <<= 1;
    }

    if (prev_bit) result += y;

    return result;
}

The above code does not check for overflow. Below is a slightly modified version that multiplies two 16 bit numbers and returns a 32 bit number so it never overflows:

/* Multiply two 16-bit signed integers using the Booth algorithm */
/* Returns a 32-bit signed integer */
int32_t booth(int16_t x, int16_t y)
{
    int16_t prev_bit = 0;
    int16_t sign_bit = (x >> 16) & 0x1;
    int32_t result = 0;
    int32_t y1 = static_cast<int32_t>(y);

    while (x != 0) {
        int16_t current_bit = x & 0x1;
        if (prev_bit & ~current_bit) {
            result += y1; 
        } else if (~prev_bit & current_bit) {
            result -= y1;
        }

        prev_bit = current_bit;

        x = static_cast<uint16_t>(x) >> 1;
        y1 <<= 1;
    }

    if (prev_bit & ~sign_bit) result += y1;

    return result;
}
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Very simple pal ...each time when you left shift a number it means you are multiplying the number by 2 which means ans is (x<<3)-x

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Multiplication with shift and add is easy

  • saw some solutions here but not explained
  • so here it is in full
  • basic formula: a * b = c
  • rewrite b to binary number form
  • for 32 bit numbers you get:
  • a * ( b0*(2^0) + b1*(2^1) + ... + b31*(2^31) ) = c
  • 2^i is the same as 1 << i
  • b0,...,b31 are the bits from b

Now the obvious code (tested for unsigned 32bit ints):

DWORD mul(DWORD a,DWORD b)
    {
    DWORD c=0,i,m;
    for (m=1,i=0;i<32;i++,m<<=1,a<<=1)
     if (DWORD(b&m))
      c+=a;
    return c;
    }

and also can be further optimized

  • reset all used bits in b
  • then the loop can end if b==0
  • so no need for i
  • for more speed also a>=b so swap them if not (less bits of b means less iterations)

optimized code

DWORD mul(DWORD a,DWORD b)
    {
    DWORD c;
    if (a<b) { c=a; a=b; b=c; }
    for (c=0;b;b>>=1,a<<=1)
     if (DWORD(b&1))
      c+=a;
    return c;
    }

if you need bigint multiplication have a look here Fast bignum square computation

  • there are some ideas
  • the use of NTT is also possible
  • have speed it up 40x times so its usable, but still for veeeery big numbers
  • for more info look here NTT (finite field DFT) optimization

if you need signed numbers then handle signum separately

int mul(int a,int b)
    {
    int c,s;
    s=+1;
    if (a<0) { s=-s; a=-a; }
    if (b<0) { s=-s; b=-b; }
    if (a<b) { c=a; a=b; b=c; }
    for (c=0;b;b>>=1,a<<=1)
     if (DWORD(b&1))
      c+=a;
    if (s<0) c=-c;
    return c;
    }

And last but not least Do not forget about OVERFLOW !!!

  • (n0)bits * (n1)bits = (n0+n1)bits
  • to avoid overflow you need to use 2N-bit shift and add arithmetics
  • so the result is also 2N-bit long

hope it helps

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Ugly and slow and untested, but...

int mult(a,b){
    int i, rv=0;
    for(i=0; i < 31; ++i){
        if(a & i<<i){
            rv += b << i
        }
    }
    if(a & 1<<31){ // two's complement
        rv -= b<<31;
    }
    return rv;
}
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4  
You could at least test it before submitting to Stack Overflow. –  Adam Pierce Jan 15 '10 at 4:34
2  
a & i << i. Think about that for a little bit. –  Bear Jan 15 '10 at 6:00
    
Adam: Didn't have a compiler, I'm afraid. But point taken. I won't do that again. Bear: Yep, I think that was supposed to be 1<<i. This is why Adam is telling me to test my code. –  Wang Jan 20 '10 at 18:56
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