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(defun remov(l)
  (defparameter z ())
  (setq contor 0)
  (setq counter 0)
  (dolist (elem l) 
    (if
        (or (< (expt 2 contor) counter) (> (expt 2 contor) counter)) 
        ((push elem z) (setq contor (+ 1 contor))) (setq counter (+ 1 counter)))
    )


  (print e)
  )

Why do I get Error: Illegal function object: (PUSH ELEM Z). [condition type: TYPE-ERROR]? What does this mean?

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You have an extra set of parentheses before (push elem z). –  Barmar Dec 20 '13 at 6:58
2  
Didn't I tell you in your earlier question that you should not put defparameter inside a function? –  Barmar Dec 20 '13 at 6:59
    
possible duplicate of LISP "Error Illegal function object..." –  Joshua Taylor Dec 20 '13 at 13:40
2  
Looks like you're attempting to write C code in Lisp. You'll probably have more success if you stop doing that and learn Lisp instead. –  molbdnilo Dec 20 '13 at 13:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Please learn how indentation and whitespace is used in Lisp, and where newlines help and where they do not.

(defun remov (l)
  (defparameter z ())
  (setq contor 0)
  (setq counter 0)
  (dolist (elem l) 
    (if (or (< (expt 2 contor) counter)
            (> (expt 2 contor) counter))
        ((push elem z) (setq contor (+ 1 contor)))
        (setq counter (+ 1 counter))))
  (print e))

The immediate problem: if takes three arguments, evaluates the first, then evaluates and returns either the second or the third. The second form is:

((push elem z) (setq contor (+ 1 contor)))

The first element of an evaluated form is the operator, which is either the name of a function or special operator, or a lambda expression. A lambda expression is a form like (lambda (x) ...). Here, (push elem z) does not fit that description. That is the error you are getting.

Your intent seems to be to do two things, one after another. That is usually done in a progn form.

(progn
  (push elem z)
  (setq contor (+ 1 contor)))

This yields:

(defun remov (l)
  (defparameter z ())
  (setq contor 0)
  (setq counter 0)
  (dolist (elem l) 
    (if (or (< (expt 2 contor) counter)
            (> (expt 2 contor) counter))
        (progn
          (push elem z)
          (setq contor (+ 1 contor)))
        (setq counter (+ 1 counter))))
  (print e))

Now, that defparameter. This makes z a globally special variable. After you have called this function at least once, z will be special anywhere in your whole program. That is not what you want. It seems that you simply want to establish a new local binding. Use let for that.

(defun remov (l)
  (let ((z ()))
    (setq contor 0)
    (setq counter 0)
    (dolist (elem l) 
      (if (or (< (expt 2 contor) counter)
              (> (expt 2 contor) counter))
          (progn
            (push elem z)
            (setq contor (+ 1 contor)))
          (setq counter (+ 1 counter))))
    (print e)))

Then, you have the two setq forms. Unless you have created a binding of contor and counter outside of the shown code, this code has undefined behaviour ("anything might happen"). Setq does not establish a new binding. It seems that you just want to establish new local bindings, just like with z. Use the let form.

(defun remov (l)
  (let ((z ())
        (contor 0)
        (counter 0))
    (dolist (elem l) 
      (if (or (< (expt 2 contor) counter)
              (> (expt 2 contor) counter))
          (progn
            (push elem z)
            (setq contor (+ 1 contor)))
          (setq counter (+ 1 counter))))
    (print e)))

Now the let establishes local bindings for z, contor and counter.

Last error: e is not bound in the code shown. I have no idea what you want to do here, but I assume that you just want to return z after you took such pains to create it. Since you loop over l and push into z, z has the reverse order in comparison to the corresponding values of l. The idiom, if you want to have the same order, is to use nreverse at the end. A function returns the value of the last form.

(defun remov (l)
  (let ((z ())
        (contor 0)
        (counter 0))
    (dolist (elem l) 
      (if (or (< (expt 2 contor) counter)
              (> (expt 2 contor) counter))
          (progn
            (push elem z)
            (setq contor (+ 1 contor)))
          (setq counter (+ 1 counter))))
    (nreverse z)))

Now, let's simplify a bit. To setq a variable to 1+ its value, use the macro incf. (Incf foo) expands to something like (setq foo (1+ foo)).

(defun remov (l)
  (let ((z ())
        (contor 0)
        (counter 0))
    (dolist (elem l) 
      (if (or (< (expt 2 contor) counter)
              (> (expt 2 contor) counter))
          (progn
            (push elem z)
            (incf contor))
          (incf counter)))
    (nreverse z)))

If an integer a is either > or < than something, it is /=.

(defun remov (l)
  (let ((z ())
        (contor 0)
        (counter 0))
    (dolist (elem l) 
      (if (/= (expt 2 contor) counter)
          (progn
            (push elem z)
            (incf contor))
          (incf counter)))
    (nreverse z)))

I tend to avoid abbreviations for names.

(defun remove-when-foo (list)
  (let ((result ())
        (contor 0)
        (counter 0))
    (dolist (element list) 
      (if (/= (expt 2 contor) counter)
          (progn
            (push element result)
            (incf contor))
          (incf counter)))
    (nreverse z)))

I am a bit surprised about that logic, since the condition for the if form will always be true in this loop. That is why I named it remove-when-foo. I guess that correcting this is your next endeavour.

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Excellent answer! If I could upvote it more than once, I would. –  Aaron Miller Dec 20 '13 at 20:33

If you want to execute multiple expressions as a block, you have to use progn, you can't just wrap them in a list. The first element of a list is expected to be the function to call, and (push elem z) is not a valid function.

(if
    (or (< (expt 2 contor) counter) (> (expt 2 contor) counter)) 
    (progn
      (push elem z)
      (setq contor (+ 1 contor)))
    (setq counter (+ 1 counter)))
)
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