Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say, I have six types, and they each belong in a conceptual category.
Here is a diagram that shows this:

Types A, B, and C wrapped inside a box called "Type Category 1" and types D, E, and F wrapped inside a box called "Type Category 2"


Or Perhaps a more specific example for you: Apple, Orange and Banana are all Fruit.  Carrot, Onion, and Cabbage are all Vegetables


I want to write two functions that will handle all 6 types.
Types in "Category 1" get handled a certain way, and types in "Category 2" get handled a different way.

Let's get into the code. First, I'll create the six types.

//Category 1 Types
class Type_A{};
class Type_B{};
class Type_C{};

//Category 2 Types
class Type_D{};
class Type_E{};
class Type_F{};

Next, I'll create two type traits so that the category of the type can be discovered at compile time.

/* Build The Category 1 Type Trait */

//Type_A Type Trait
template <typename T>
struct Is_Type_A {
  static const bool value = false;
};
template <>
struct Is_Type_A<Type_A> {
  static const bool value = true;
};

//Type_B Type Trait
template <typename T>
struct Is_Type_B {
  static const bool value = false;
};
template <>
struct Is_Type_B<Type_B> {
  static const bool value = true;
};

//Type_C Type Trait
template <typename T>
struct Is_Type_C {
  static const bool value = false;
};
template <>
struct Is_Type_C<Type_C> {
  static const bool value = true;
};

//Category 1 Type Trait
template <typename T>
struct Is_Type_From_Category_1 {
  static const bool value = Is_Type_A<T>::value || Is_Type_B<T>::value || Is_Type_C<T>::value;
};

/* Build The Category 2 Type Trait */

//Type_D Type Trait
template <typename T>
struct Is_Type_D {
  static const bool value = false;
};
template <>
struct Is_Type_D<Type_D> {
  static const bool value = true;
};

//Type_E Type Trait
template <typename T>
struct Is_Type_E {
  static const bool value = false;
};
template <>
struct Is_Type_E<Type_E> {
  static const bool value = true;
};

//Type_F Type Trait
template <typename T>
struct Is_Type_F {
  static const bool value = false;
};
template <>
struct Is_Type_F<Type_F> {
  static const bool value = true;
};

//Category 1 Type Trait
template <typename T>
struct Is_Type_From_Category_2 {
  static const bool value = Is_Type_D<T>::value || Is_Type_E<T>::value || Is_Type_F<T>::value;
};

Now that I have two type traits to distinguish what category each of the six types fall into, I want to write two functions. One function will accept everything from Category 1, and the other function will accept everything from Category 2. Is there a way to do this without creating some kind of dispatching function? Can I find a way to have only two functions; one for each category?


EDIT: I have tried to use enable_if like this, but such an attempt will result in a compiler error.

//Handle all types from Category 1
template<class T ,class = typename std::enable_if<Is_Type_From_Category_1<T>::value>::type >
void function(T t){
    //do category 1 stuff to the type
    return;
}

//Handle all types from Category 2
template<class T ,class = typename std::enable_if<Is_Type_From_Category_2<T>::value>::type >
void function(T t){
    //do category 2 stuff to the type
    return;
}

Edit 2: I've tried the code provided in the link, but this isn't a yes or no decision on whether or not to call the function. It's which function do I call, given two type traits. This would be a redefinition error.

//Handle all types from Category 2
template<class T, class dummy = typename std::enable_if< Is_Type_From_Category_1<T>::value, void>::type>
void function(T t){
    //do category 1 stuff to the type
    return;
}
//Handle all types from Category 2
template<class T, class dummy = typename std::enable_if< Is_Type_From_Category_2<T>::value, void>::type>
void function(T t){
    //do category 2 stuff to the type
    return;
}
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Understanding SFINAE –  Potatoswatter Dec 20 '13 at 8:23
    
@Potatoswatter right, but I don't think I can overload with a type trait can I? They have to be discovered true or false first; which would mean I have to dispatch? –  Trevor Hickey Dec 20 '13 at 8:23
    
See the linked Q&A. Is enable_if not exactly what you're looking for? –  Potatoswatter Dec 20 '13 at 8:24
    
@Potatoswatter well, I've tried enable_if, but I can't write two identical function signatures that use enable_if; at least I don't think so. I will update my question with that attempt. –  Trevor Hickey Dec 20 '13 at 8:25
1  
stackoverflow.com/questions/15427667/… I think there is a nice short answer that you may accept –  typical Dec 20 '13 at 8:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Two functions signatures are not allowed to differ only by the default value of a template parameter. What would happen if you explicitly called function< int, void >?

Usual usage of enable_if is as the function return type.

//Handle all types from Category 1
template<class T >
typename std::enable_if<Is_Type_From_Category_1<T>::value>::type
function(T t){
    //do category 1 stuff to the type
    return;
}

//Handle all types from Category 2
template<class T >
typename std::enable_if<Is_Type_From_Category_2<T>::value>::type
function(T t){
    //do category 2 stuff to the type
    return;
}
share|improve this answer
    
If the return types are different, why do both the functions appear to return void? –  Trevor Hickey Dec 20 '13 at 8:52
2  
@TrevorHickey enable_if has an optional second template argument for the return type, which defaults to void. –  Potatoswatter Dec 20 '13 at 9:17

I think using tag despatch would be easier than SFINAE.

template<class T>
struct Category;

template<>
struct Category<Type_A> : std::integral_constant<int, 1> {};
template<>
struct Category<Type_B> : std::integral_constant<int, 1> {};
template<>
struct Category<Type_C> : std::integral_constant<int, 1> {};

template<>
struct Category<Type_D> : std::integral_constant<int, 2> {};
template<>
struct Category<Type_E> : std::integral_constant<int, 2> {};
template<>
struct Category<Type_F> : std::integral_constant<int, 2> {};

template<class T>
void foo(std::integral_constant<int, 1>, T x)
{
    // Category 1 types.
}

template<class T>
void foo(std::integral_constant<int, 2>, T x)
{
    // Category 2 types.
}

template<class T>
void foo(T x)
{
    foo(Category<T>(), x);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
template<class T> struct Category<Type_A> : std::integral_constant<int, 1> {}; Did you want to use full specialization? –  Constructor Dec 20 '13 at 12:54
    
@Constructor yes, thanks for spotting it. –  Simple Dec 20 '13 at 14:08
    
I think this could be made a bit cleaner and more readable by replacing the integral_constants with tag types Category1 and Category2, and removing the then-superfluous comments. –  Casey Dec 20 '13 at 15:26

As an alternative to category selection via "traits", you can also consider CRTP (where the type carries the category as a base):

template<class Derived> class category1 {};
template<class Derived> class category2 {};

class A1: public category1<A1> { ..... };
class A2: public category2<A2> { ..... };
class B1: public category1<B1> { ..... };
class B2: public category2<B2> { ..... };

template<class T>void funcion_on1(category1<T>& st)
{
   T& t = static_cast<T&>(st);
   .....
}

template<class T>void funcion_on1(category2<T>& st)
{
   T& t = static_cast<T&>(st);
   .....
}

The advantage is to have a less polluted namespace.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work because a reference to template specialization will not bind to, and deduce the template arguments from, a base class subobject. –  Potatoswatter Dec 20 '13 at 9:18
    
Of course, & can be const& or && depending on what you have to bind to. I have tons of libraries that work that way, so -please- don't jusge on prejudice! There is NO template specialization in there. Just pure type deduction. I really don't see in that code what you are talking about –  Emilio Garavaglia Dec 20 '13 at 10:21

I learned the following technique from R. Martinho Fernandes. The code shown below is written to illustrate the bare bones of the problem but you should refer to this blog post to get the full range of tricks to make it pretty.

You've already mentioned that you're running into problems because of signatures being identical. The trick is to make the types to be different.

Your second approach is close, but we can't use void as the resulting type of the std::enable_if<>.

Note that the following code does not compile, and specifying void for the std::enable_if<> does not change anything since the default is void anyway.

#include <iostream>

class A {};
class B {};

template <
    typename T, 
    typename = typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<T, A>::value>::type>
void F(T) {
  std::cout << "A" << std::endl;
}

template <
    typename T, 
    typename = typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<T, B>::value>::type>
void F(T) {
  std::cout << "B" << std::endl;
}

int main() {
  F(A{});
  F(B{});
}

The reason, as you already described is because the signatures are identical. Let's differentiate them.

#include <iostream>

class A {};
class B {};

template <
    typename T,
    typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<T, A>::value, int>::type = 0>
void F(T) {
  std::cout << "A" << std::endl;
}

template <
    typename T, 
    typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<T, B>::value, int>::type = 0>
void F(T) {
  std::cout << "B" << std::endl;
}

int main() {
  F(A{});
  F(B{});
}

Prints:

A
B

We have now differentiated the types between the 2 functions because rather than the second template parameter being a type, it is now an int.

This approach is preferable to using std::enable_if<> in the return type for example since constructors don't have return types, the pattern wouldn't be applicable for those.

Notes: std::is_same<> is used with a single class to simplify the condition.

share|improve this answer
    
The dummy int may get in the way, particularly with a parameter pack. Why not follow the SFINAE by return type idiom? –  Potatoswatter Dec 20 '13 at 9:22
    
The point described in the answer for preferring this method is because return type idiom can't be applied to constructors. However you bring up a good point that this pattern doesn't work with variadic template parameters. Perhaps both approaches can be considered, or perhaps there's a pattern that can be applied in all cases. –  mpark Dec 20 '13 at 9:40
    
There is another place to stick SFINAE, in the exception-specification as noexcept( SFINAE ). And non-deduced function arguments are also a hook. However, the common usage is to use the return type by default, as it's been done since C++98. –  Potatoswatter Dec 20 '13 at 9:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.