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I have some text files in a folder. The data of the text files are shown below.

USA     Germany   23-12 
USA     Germany   23-12 
USA     Germany   23-12 
France  Germany   15-12
France  Germany   15-12
France  Italy     25-50
China   China     30-32
China   China     30-32

I would like to count the unique numbers of each country in the first and second columns based on the numbers of third column. I need to save the outputs into another folder as the file names of input.

Desired output

USA       1
Germany   2
France    2
Italy     1
China     2
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closed as off-topic by Jotne, amon, perreal, fedorqui, Tim B Dec 20 '13 at 9:34

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Jotne, amon, perreal, fedorqui, Tim B
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4  
I wonder who upvoted this. How did you get the numbers in the second column of the output? –  perreal Dec 20 '13 at 8:36
    
@perreal "unique numbers of each country in the first and second columns based on the numbers of third column" -- yeah it adds up to the numbers he says –  janos Dec 20 '13 at 8:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
perl -lane'
  $F[2] .= 1 if $F[0] eq $F[1] and $s{$F[0]};
  $s{$_}{$F[2]} = 1 for @F[0,1]; 
  END { printf("$_\t%s\n", scalar keys %{$s{$_}}) for sort keys %s }
' file

and if order matters,

perl -lane'
  $F[2] .= 1 if $F[0] eq $F[1] and $s{$F[0]};
  push(@r,$s{$_} ? () : $_), $s{$_}{$F[2]} = 1 for @F[0,1]; 
  END { printf("$_\t%s\n", scalar keys %{$s{$_}}) for @r }
' file

output

USA     1
Germany 2
France  2
Italy   1
China   2
share|improve this answer
    
China should be 2. –  janos Dec 20 '13 at 8:48
    
@janos yes, but it seems there is an error either in OP input or output –  mpapec Dec 20 '13 at 8:51
    
@mpapec Thank you for your answer. china should be 2. It's not a mistake. –  user3122011 Dec 20 '13 at 8:58
    
@user3122011 check update –  mpapec Dec 20 '13 at 9:05
    
@mpapec Your code worked well for single file. How can I change the code for multiple files? –  user3122011 Dec 20 '13 at 10:04

Given this awk code in parse.awk:

function get_name(name_colon_x) {
    return substr(name_colon_x, 1, index(name_colon_x, ":") - 1)
}
{
    u1[$1 ":" $3]
    u2[$2 ":" $3]
}
END {
    for (i in u1) u[get_name(i)]++
    for (i in u2) u[get_name(i)]++
    for (i in u) print i, u[i]
}

And your data in data.txt, then:

$ awk -f parse.awk data.txt
USA 1
France 2
Germany 2
China 2
Italy 1
share|improve this answer
    
I think substring indices start at 1 not 0 in awk.. –  Håkon Hægland Dec 20 '13 at 9:12
1  
@HåkonHægland you're right, of course ;-) –  janos Dec 20 '13 at 9:29
    
+1 I think it is an interesting solution. I just wonder it you could have avoided using the function? –  Håkon Hægland Dec 20 '13 at 9:39
    
@janos Thanks for your answer. The last character of the first column doesn't print in my output. Also, I would like to print the outputs to another folder with the filenames of input. How can I change your program? –  user3122011 Dec 20 '13 at 9:43
    
@HåkonHægland thanks, and I'm pretty sure you could write it better (I see your awk answers pretty much every day ;-) –  janos Dec 20 '13 at 9:52

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