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After some find and replace refactoring I ended up with this gem:

const class A
{
};

What does "const class" mean? It seems to compile ok.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

What does "const class" mean? It seems to compile ok.

Not for me it doesn't. I think your compiler's just being polite and ignoring it.

Edit: Yep, VC++ silently ignores the const, GCC complains.

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3  
I'm going to say it looks like an edge case that VC++ is getting wrong –  1800 INFORMATION Oct 16 '08 at 0:31
    
Looks like; the 'const' doesn't affect anything that I can find. –  Mike F Oct 16 '08 at 0:34

The const is meaningless in that example, and your compiler should give you an error, but if you use it to declare variables of that class between the closing } and the ;, then that defines those instances as const, e.g.:


const class A
{
public:
    int x, y;
}  anInstance = {3, 4};

// The above is equivalent to:
const A anInstance = {3, 4};
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2  
I can't find a justification to make this an error. Compilers may emit warnings at will, but only the standard determines what counts as an error. –  MSalters Oct 16 '08 at 11:11
    
Because you're declaring something as const that isn't. This is something that is never what you want to do, and so should be an error. The standard should determine what is correct; defining every wrong thing would be too much work. –  Bernard Oct 16 '08 at 11:43
    
I think that the term used in the standard is "illformed". The standard doesn't say what isn't allowed, only what is. This isn't valid C++ syntax, therefore isn't allowed. –  KeithB Oct 16 '08 at 12:43
3  
It's an error because the storage class specifiers are only applicable if you have a declarator and in this example there is no declarator. –  Richard Corden Oct 16 '08 at 14:41
6  
7.1.5.1/1: "There are two cv-qualifiers, const and volatile. If a cv-qualifier appears in a decl-specifier-seq, the init-declarator-list of the declaration shall not be empty." –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 14 '09 at 12:09

If you had this:

const class A
{
} a;

Then it would clearly mean that 'a' is const. Otherwise, I think that it is likely invalid c++.

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Good old forgotten features of C++! I do remember doing stuff like that in C long ago thou. –  Robert Gould Oct 16 '08 at 1:47

It's meaningless unless you declare an instance of the class afterward, such as this example:

const // It is a const object...
class nullptr_t 
{
  public:
    template<class T>
      operator T*() const // convertible to any type of null non-member pointer...
    { return 0; }

    template<class C, class T>
    operator T C::*() const   // or any type of null member pointer...
    { return 0; }

  private:
    void operator&() const;  // Can't take address of nullptr

} nullptr = {};

An interim nullptr implementation if you're waiting for C++0x.

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