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Not sure what to call this to be honest but we shall see if you get the point by my question.

I have a table on a standard HTML page and using Javascript/jQuery I have some calculations.

Example:

function addThem() {
    var result;

    result = userInput + 100;
    return result;
}

This is just an example of a simple (uncompleted) function I have. What I want to do is grab a user input and then display the result in a table. So as far as I know I can do this using:

document.getElementById("addThemResult").innerHTML = result;

and the HTML would be:

<td id="addThemResult"></td>

I have done this before and it works. Now my problem is, I will have multiple fields for the same thing but have no idea how to accept multiple user inputs and display them using the same function.

Live Example

I bet im not making much sense so I will try create a little example.

EXAMPLE HERE

HTML:

<table>
    <tr>
        <td></td>
        <td>One</td>
        <td>Two</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Money</td>
        <td>
            <input id="money1" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input id="money2" />
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Money Left</td>
        <td id="moneyleft1"></td>
        <td id="moneyleft2"></td>
    </tr>
</table>

Javascript/jQuery:

$(document).ready(function () {
    $('input').keyup(function () {
        cal();
    });
});

function cal() {
    var cal1, result;
    cal1 = parseFloat(document.getElementById("money1").value);

    result = cal1 - 100;
    document.getElementById("moneyleft1").innerHTML = "£" + result;
}

So if we look at the example I made, if you input a value into "money - one" input it will display the result below. What I now want to do is get the result in "money - two" using the second input and using the same function.

How would I go about doing this, please note that what I need to use this for is a lot bigger and has around 6 rows of this.

I hope this made some sense and any help would be great, it maybe a simple thing but I cant seem to get my head around it.

Update:

As I ran into more I needed to do it has changed from what I thought it was. Now there are more inputs and they are pretty much everywhere. Some of them need to be used in the calculations and others will display the result in a field

UPDATE EXAMPLE

As you can see the results will always change no matter what input you type in. I need that to stop and I want to point them where they should go and when they should change.

E.g:

Money = 10000 so the field "cal1" for that column changes. 

If I then type in the miles input:

Miles = 2300 the "cal1" field should not change and "cal2" field should have the result.

I can only think to do it this way but it feels with a cheat.

CHEAT WAY?

So putting class on each of the inputs then keyup on that class.

Edit: I am still not able to get the values from the inputs in the same column. Also I think my "cheat" way will not work.

Update 2:

Right I made a better example, that was my fault because I didn;t explain it as well as it should have been.

In this example you will see that there are multiple inputs but they only work in the first column (due to no knowing how to make the others work). So now I need to get that working in ALL over columns using the same functions.

UPDATE 2 EXAMPE

HTML:

<table>
    <tr>
        <th></th>
        <th>Option1</th>
        <th>Option2</th>
        <th>Option3</th>
        <th>Option4</th>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Money</td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" id="money" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Upfront</td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" id="upfront" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Overall Price</td>
        <td id="overallPrice"></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Discount</td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" id="discount" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Dicount Price</td>
        <td id="discountPrice"></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
</table>

Javascript/jQuery:

$(document).ready(function () {
    $('input').keyup(function () {
        overallPrice();
        discountPrice();
    });
});

function overallPrice() {
    var cal1, cal2, result;
    cal1 = parseFloat(document.getElementById("money").value);
    cal2 = parseFloat(document.getElementById("upfront").value);
    result = cal1 - cal2;
    document.getElementById("overallPrice").innerHTML = "£" + result;
    return result;
}

function discountPrice() {
    var cal1, cal2, result;
    cal1 = parseFloat(document.getElementById("discount").value);
    cal2 = overallPrice();
    result = cal2 - cal1;
    document.getElementById("discountPrice").innerHTML = "£" + result;
}

Its a little different from my first due to the extra rows with inputs. The answers so far do not make it possible to fill in the second set of inputs in a column.

Note: There will be more then 2 sets of inputs, this is just an example.

share|improve this question
1  
Should the second id="moneyleft1" be id="moneyleft2"? –  Barmar Dec 20 '13 at 9:43
    
@Barmar Sorry, yes it should I will change that now. Sorry about that. –  Ruddy Dec 20 '13 at 9:44
    
Why do you need to call overallPrice in the keyup handler when it's called by discountPrice? –  Barmar Dec 20 '13 at 15:39
    
@Barmar Good point but that's a minor "problem"? Compared to what huge problem this question is being to me. I have no idea why I cant get my head around this. –  Ruddy Dec 20 '13 at 15:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

this should work for any number of <td>'s .. just that the last table row should have an id.. in my case that is total

...
 <tr id="total">
    <td>Money Left</td>
    <td></td>
    <td></td>
</tr>
....

try this

 $(document).ready(function () {
  $('input').keyup(function () {
     cal(this);
  });
 });

 function cal(obj) {

   var result = parseFloat(obj.value) - 100;
   var tdPos=$(obj).parent().index();
   $('#total').find('td:eq('+tdPos+')').html("£" + result);
}

just incase if you cannot modify the HTML element...without the id , your selector should be

 function cal(obj) {
   var cal1, result;
   cal1 = parseFloat(obj.value);

   result = cal1 - 100;
   var tdPos=$(obj).parent().index();
   //$('#total').find('td:eq('+tdPos+')').html("£" + result);
   //here
   $(obj).closest('tr').next().find('td:eq('+tdPos+')').html("£" + result); 
}

in short

$(document).ready(function () {
 $('input').keyup(function () {
   var result = parseFloat(this.value) - 100;
   var tdPos=$(this).parent().index();
   $('#total').find('td:eq('+tdPos+')').html("£" + result);
 });
});

but i always go with the first id selector one .. performance wise , first one is far better since id selector is fast and don't have to traverse though the DOM elements.

fiddle here

2nd fiddle

fiddle with multiple columns

share|improve this answer
    
I like this one, very nice. Will have ago with the one as well see what makes my life easier. Thank you for your answer. Note: I can change the HTML. :) –  Ruddy Dec 20 '13 at 10:11
    
well with this.. you don't need to think about you javascript function.. even if you add multiple columns to your table.. same function will work.. –  bipen Dec 20 '13 at 10:13
    
Hey, how can I find a input that's lower down on the same column. E.g: below id="total" in a tr with id="newNumber". If that made sense. (I need to use this in my calculations. –  Ruddy Dec 20 '13 at 11:05
    
Hmm, I have ran into a problem. I didn't realise this was a thing but I don't think this will work for me. I have inputs in the same columns and different rows. this will pick up any inputs in the column for this right? –  Ruddy Dec 20 '13 at 12:08
    
same columns and different rows.. can u modify the fiddle please.. –  bipen Dec 20 '13 at 12:18

Use this. And some rules to your IDs :)

$(document).ready(function () {
    $('input').keyup(function () {
        cal($(this));
    });
});

function cal(input) {
    var cal1 = parseFloat(input.val()),
        result = cal1 - 100;
    $('#' + input.attr("id") + "left").html("£" + result);
}

What I suggest here is that you name your result fields like your inputs and append "left". Then you send $(this) as input to your cal function. It will be a reference to the element the keyup event was triggered on. To reference the output/result cell you get the input field's ID and concatenate it with "left".

Hope it helps. Code is untested :)

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't that be parseFloat(input.val()) since you're passing in a jQuery object? The last line should probably read $('#' + input.prop('id') + 'left').text(....); –  thebjorn Dec 20 '13 at 9:54
    
You're right about val() - I've updated that. According to my tests you can get the ID with attr('id'). Whether to use html() or text() doesn't matter much. I don't know if there are any performance differences, but since text() escapes the input it could be slower(?). –  fiskeben Dec 20 '13 at 10:00
    
You could get the ID with attr in previous versions of jQuery, but I was under the impression that they wanted us to use prop(). In any case you'll need to prepend a #. I chose text() since that seems to be the intended semantics, but html() will work as well (although not capitalized :-) –  thebjorn Dec 20 '13 at 10:06
    
Christ... :) I updated the answer. –  fiskeben Dec 20 '13 at 10:08

try this,

$(document).ready(function () {
    $('input').keyup(function () {
        cal(this);
    });
});

function cal(obj) {
    var cal1, result;
    cal1 = parseFloat(document.getElementById(obj.id).value);

    result = cal1 - 100;
    if(obj.id=='money1'){
    document.getElementById("moneyleft1").innerHTML = "£" + result;
    }else{
         document.getElementById("moneyleft2").innerHTML = "£" + result;
    }
}

Also change the id as it should be unique.

<td id="moneyleft1"></td>
<td id="moneyleft2"></td>

DEMO Updated

For multiple <td> you should try this

function cal(obj) {
    var cal1, result;
    cal1 = parseFloat(document.getElementById(obj.id).value);

    result = cal1 - 100;var $this = $(this);
    var cellIndex = $(obj).parent().index();
    $(obj).closest('tr').next().children().eq(cellIndex).html("£"+result);

}

NEW DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
Your demo links to my original one (you should change that) but this is looking promising. Let me have a pay around with it a little. Also no need for the second part, that ID was a typo. –  Ruddy Dec 20 '13 at 9:47
    
yeah, I have updated, please check now –  anand4tech Dec 20 '13 at 9:49
    
This will take me a little time to implement into my real one so don't wait about. I will comment when I know if this does the trick for me. Thank you for your fast response! –  Ruddy Dec 20 '13 at 9:51
1  
haha, Ruddy thinks we all just sit here with baited breath, waiting for the OP to let us know what he thinks of our answers. :) –  Barmar Dec 20 '13 at 9:53
1  
@Ruddy, I did't mean that,I just tried to help you so that you could solve problem in less time...never mind :-) –  anand4tech Dec 20 '13 at 10:03

This answer takes advantage of the inputs and outputs being in corresponding columns of the table, instead of constructing IDs like the other answers.

HTML:

<tr id="money">
    <td>Money</td>
    <td>
        <input />
    </td>
    <td>
        <input />
    </td>
</tr>
<tr id="moneyleft">
    <td>Money Left</td>
    <td></td>
    <td></td>
</tr>

JS:

$(document).ready(function () {
    $("#money input").keyup(function () {
        var pos = $(this).parent().index();
        var result = parseFloat($(this).val()) - 100;
        $("#moneyleft").children().eq(pos).text("£" + result);
    });
});

DEMO

UPDATE:

HTML:

<table>
    <tr>
        <th></th>
        <th>Option1</th>
        <th>Option2</th>
        <th>Option3</th>
        <th>Option4</th>
    </tr>
    <tr id="money">
        <td>Money</td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr id="upfront">
        <td>Upfront</td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr id="overallPrice">
        <td>Overall Price</td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
    <tr id="discount">
        <td>Discount</td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="number" />
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr id="discountPrice">
        <td>Dicount Price</td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
        <td></td>
    </tr>
</table>

JS:

$(document).ready(function () {
    $("input").keyup(function () {
        var pos = $(this).parent().index();
        overallPrice(pos);
        discountPrice(pos);
    });
});

function overallPrice(index) {
    var money = parseFloat($("#money").children().eq(index).find("input").val());
    var upfront = parseFloat($("#upfront").children().eq(index).find("input").val());
    var result = money - upfront;
    $("#overallPrice td").eq(index).text("£" + result);
    return result;
}

function discountPrice(index) {
    var discount = parseFloat($("#discount").children().eq(index).find("input").val());
    var overall = overallPrice(index);
    var result = overall - discount;
    $("#discountPrice td").eq(index).text("£" + result);
    return result;
}

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
Example of this would be nice as I can't seem to get this to run. –  Ruddy Dec 20 '13 at 9:56
    
$(this).parent()? –  thebjorn Dec 20 '13 at 9:56
    
Updated and tested, see demo. –  Barmar Dec 20 '13 at 10:04
    
@Barmar I updated my question (alot!) due to things I didn't see when writing the question. Any help with it now would be great. –  Ruddy Dec 20 '13 at 15:27
    
If you can't figure out how to extrapolate my answer to your updated question, computer programming is too complicated for you. It's just one more row, you do it exactly the same. –  Barmar Dec 20 '13 at 15:30

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