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#include<iostream>
#include<string.h>
#include<math.h>
using namespace std;    

bool prime[1000000500];
void generate(long long end)
{
    memset(prime,true,sizeof(prime));
    prime[0]=false;
    prime[1]=false;

        for(long long i=0;i<=sqrt(end);i++)
        {
         if(prime[i]==true)
         {
             for(long long y=i*i;y<=end;y+=i)
             {
                 prime[y]=false;
             }
         }
        }
}

int main()
{
    int n;
    long long b,e;
    scanf("%d",&n);
    while(n--)
    {
        cin>>b>>e;
        generate(e);
        for(int i=b;i<e;i++)
        {
            if(prime[i])
                printf("%d\n",i);
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

That's my code for spoj prime generator.
Altought it generates the same output as another accepted code ..

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6 Answers 6

You don't need to sieve every number up to the end number. That's just silly. Only operate on the range between beginning and end numbers. (A partial sieve)

I've solved this problem in Python and that was the way I finally managed to do it. I also started by calculating all of the primes up to the square root of the potential maximum, 1000000000. This is only 31623 so it doesn't take long.

From this list use those numbers up to the square root of the current case maximum to sieve the current case.

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exactly right! I think I saw it called "offset sieve" somewhere. –  Will Ness Jun 3 '12 at 20:18

This problem requires a Segmented Sieve implementation. A simple segmented Sieve of Eratosthenes can be easily coded in C/C++ in about 50-60 lines of code. If you implement a segmented sieve you need to allocate only the memory for the maximum sized segment mentioned in the problem.

You can also make couple of other optimization to make it faster. I will tell the optimizations which I made in my program.

  • We need to check for the multiples of only up to square root of maximum number and that too we need to check for only the multiples of prime numbers. So we can have an array with all the prime numbers till the square root of the maximum possible number i.e Sqrt(10^9) hard coded in the program and then pick from this array to test for multiples. Spoj source code size limit is 50000 bytes for this problem so we can use this array with all those prime numbers without a problem.

  • Secondly, to cross out multiples, we need to start from y=i*i as
    you did in your program, but you need to check only odd multiples of
    i, so we can add i+i to y insted of i ( y += i+i ). Just make sure that you start at an odd multiple of i.

With these optimizations my code in C++ ran in 0.05s. But I think even without these optimization a segmented sieve will get accepted. Hope this helps.

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sieving up to 32000 should be instantaneous, no need to bother with inlining (it's easy to introduce a typo there, too). What we could do in advance is use the hard-coded values like limit=32000 and length of core primes array as 3432. Plus, it's not "segmented" sieve as it processes various segments in isolation per request, with common pre-sieved core, not proceeds sequentially by segments, one after another, adding to the core, as the segmented sieve does. It's more like "offset" sieve. +1 for suggesting the odds-only sieve. –  Will Ness Jun 3 '12 at 20:49

An easy trick to make it faster is to lift out sqrt from the for loop:

double sqrtOfEnd = sqrt(end);
for(long long i=0; i<=sqrtOfEnd; i++)
{
  ...

You don't need to recalculate the square root on every loop.
As pointed out by others this might not be enough and you might have to concider other methods of finding primes.

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Since you need to output primes from a number of sequences, may-be keep around the results from previous sievings and only continue to fill in the rest of the table as needed?

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That's a lot of numbers to store. Calculating the primes isn't a problem, but storing them might be. –  nakedfanatic Jan 19 '10 at 2:30

You need to make it faster - for test cases such as the range 999900000-1000000000, Eratosthene's sieve algorithm is too slow. There are other alternatives you could try and will yield better results.

PS. Of course I won't tell you which these are. Do your homework. :P

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Well i didn't post thsi question until i am so desperate about it ... so if you know how i can optimize it ? Please tell. –  magiix Jan 15 '10 at 9:12
    
There are a number of primality tests that can be adapted for your purpose (see Miller-Rabin, Agrawal & Biswas, Bernstein in "Proving primality in essentially quartic random time") as well as other approaches in prime number generation (Sieve of Atkin). I'm sure there are others as well, as it's a relatively 'hot' research topic. –  Michael Foukarakis Jan 15 '10 at 9:18
1  
Eratosthene's sieve algorithm is not too slow. A modified version that operates only on the test range and not on the entire range from 0 to 1000000000 will do fine. –  nakedfanatic Jan 19 '10 at 2:41
    
@nakedfanatic: You mean, a segmented Eratosthene's sieve is not too slow. It's not the same with the traditional sieve algorithm, and it certainly isn't as easy to implement. I was going to avoid mentioning it, but w/e. :) –  Michael Foukarakis Jan 19 '10 at 6:47
    
True, I leaned heavily on Python's extended slice notation. I expect it would be more painful to implement in C++. –  nakedfanatic Jan 19 '10 at 7:56

@nakedfantaic Exactly!

#include <cstdio>
#include <cmath>

unsigned int numbers[3500], len;

inline bool prime(unsigned int x)
{
    unsigned int i, last = sqrt(x);
    for (i = 2; i <= last; i++) {
        if (!(x % i)) {
            return 0;
        }
    }
    return 1;
}

void generate()
{
    for (unsigned int i = 2; i < 32000; i++) {
        if (prime(i)) {
            numbers[len++] = i;
        }
    }
}

inline bool process(unsigned long x)
{
    unsigned int i, last = sqrt(x);
    for (i = 0; i < len && numbers[i] <= last; i++) {
        if (!(x % numbers[i])) {
            return 0;
        }
    }
    return 1;
}

int main()
{
    int tests;
    unsigned long begin, end;
    generate();
    scanf("%d", &tests);
    while (tests-- > 0) {
        scanf("%u %u", &begin, &end);
        if (begin == 1) {
            begin++;
        }
        while (begin <= end) {
            if (process(begin)) {
                printf("%u\n", begin);
            }
            begin++;
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
    return 0;
}

http://pastebin.com/G5ZRd5vH

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1  
this is trial division; it is much much slower than the sieve of Eratosthenes which @nakedfanatic proposed. –  Will Ness Jun 3 '12 at 20:36

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