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I wish to create a function which returns all the possible numbers a number can be divided by. Also I wish to use these returned results in another function which looks for all the prime numbers in those results and in turn returns those.

Long story short, I want to be able to return "dynamic arrays" and use them again in another function.

What I have so far:

int *division (long a) {
    int i;
    int *divResult = malloc(a * sizeof(long)); //Ultimately I want to allocate space dynamically instead of reserving too much space

    if (naturalNumber(a)) { //What it basically does is "fmod(a, 1)" (returns boolean)
    divLength = 0; //A global int set to trace the length of division()
        for (i = 0; i < a + 1; i++) {
            if (divisor(i, a)) { //Checks wether the division of a by i returns a whole number (returns boolean)
                //divResult = realloc(divResult, sizeof(long)); //This gives seg faults and errors durning runtime; To be clear I am not exactly using it like this. What I do is I adjust the "malloc(a*sizeof(long))" to "malloc(sizeof(long))"
                divResult[i] = i; //If i is a divisor add it to the pointer
                divLength += 1; //track how long the current division is
            }
        }
    }

    free(divResult); //I was hoping this to remove the divResult from the memory, sadly it is still there and doesnt give me an error of me trying to return a NULL value
    //printf("Mem: %p\n", (void *)divResult);
    return divResult; //Return a "dynamic array" so that another function can use it
}

As you can see, I am aware of the fact that i have to use pointers instead of real arrays because those cannot be returned. I know this works and has returned true values.

Also I want this function to use the division() function to see the divisors of a number and put them in an array:

int *primes (long a) { //I'm trying to reuse the same tactic as before:
    int i;
    int *primeResult = malloc(a * sizeof(long)); //Allocating it again...

    if (naturalNumber(a)) { //See previous codeblock
        for (i = 0; i < a + 1; i++) {
            division(i); //Calling the function here to divide each number from 1 to "a" so I am able to see which one is of size 2 (in other words the division of number *1 to a* and check wether it is a prime number (it has in total only 2 divisors))
            printf("len = %d\n", divLength); //prints the current length of division()
            if (divLength == 2) { //If the division() "length" is 2
                primeResult[i] = i; //add i to primes
            }
        }
    }

    free(primeResult); //Same as above
    return primeResult;
}

As you might guess I'm not getting the expected results.

Using:

int *div;
div = division(a) + 1;
for (i = 0; i < a; i++) {
    if (*(div + i) != 0)
        printf("*(div + %d) : %d\n", i, *(div + i));
}

int *prime;
prime = primes(a) + 1;
for (i = 0; i < a; i++) {
    if (*(prime + i) != 0)
        printf("*(prime + %d) : %d\n", i, *(prime + i));
}

I get:

len = 6
len = 1
len = 2
len = 2
len = 3
len = 2
len = 4
len = 2
len = 4
len = 3
len = 4
len = 2
len = 6
*(prime + 1) : 2
*(prime + 2) : 3
*(prime + 3) : 4
*(prime + 4) : 5
*(prime + 5) : 6
*(prime + 6) : 7
*(prime + 10) : 11
*(prime + 11) : 12

I can assure you that if I comment out all the traces except the ones for division() and call primes() I still get as a result:

*(div + 1) : 2
*(div + 2) : 3
*(div + 3) : 4
*(div + 5) : 6
*(div + 11) : 12
len = 0
len = 0
len = 0
len = 0
len = 0
len = 0
len = 0
len = 0
len = 0
len = 0
len = 0
len = 0
len = 0
*(prime + 1) : 2
*(prime + 2) : 3
*(prime + 3) : 4
*(prime + 5) : 6
*(prime + 11) : 12

So, I know my code is bad; that's why I'm asking now (I'm still learning), I ask you:

  • Why is it still returning the values of division() even though I have "freed" the memory of divResult?
  • How can I get realloc() to work?
  • Is there any easier way to do all this in separate functions?

And last but not least: did anyone actually understand what I'm asking?

share|improve this question
1  
It is painful to read long questions. :) –  haccks Dec 20 '13 at 10:51
5  
IMHO it's beyond salvage. To solve your problems, you have to actually learn the C language. Explaining just what is wrong in this code would take a lot. –  Bartek Banachewicz Dec 20 '13 at 10:54
3  
Freeing up the memory and then returning a pointer to it, is like throwing away your full food container before eating it. –  Tony The Lion Dec 20 '13 at 10:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

long *division(long n){
    int i, len = 1;//for 1
    long *result;

    if(n < 1) return NULL;
    result = malloc(n * sizeof(long));
    if(result){
        for (i = 2; i <= n; ++i)//skip 1
            if(n % i == 0)
                result[len++] = i;
        result[0] = len;//put a length instead of 1
        result=realloc(result, len*sizeof(long));
    }
    return result;
}

long *factor(long n){
    int i=2, sqi=4, len = 1;
    long *result;

    if(n < 1) return NULL;
    result = malloc((n/2+1)*sizeof(long));
    if(result){
        while(sqi <= n){
            int flag = 0;
            while(n % i == 0 && (flag = 1))
                n /= i;
            if(flag)
                result[len++] = i;
            sqi += 2*(i++) + 1;
        }
        if(n != 1)result[len++] = n;
        result[0] = len;
        result=realloc(result, len*sizeof(long));
    }
    return result;
}

long *primes(long n) {Quite verbose
    int i, len = 1;
    long *result;

    if(n < 1) return NULL;
    result = malloc((n/2+2) * sizeof(long));
    if(result){
        for (i = 2; i <= n; ++i) {
            long *div=factor(i);
            if(div[1] == i) {
                result[len++] = i;
            }
            free(div);
        }
        result[0] = len;
        result=realloc(result, len*sizeof(long));
    }
    return result;
}

int main(){
    long *div = division(1234);
    int i, len = div[0];
    for(i=1;i<len;++i){
        printf("%ld\n", div[i]);
    }
    free(div);
    printf("\n");
    long *fact = factor(123456);
    len = fact[0];
    for(i=1;i<len;++i){
        printf("%ld\n", fact[i]);
    }
    free(fact);
    printf("\n");
    long *prime = primes(123);
    len = prime[0];
    for(i=1;i<len;++i){
        printf("%ld ", prime[i]);
    }
    free(prime);
    printf("\n");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your effort on writing this code it sure helped me! –  pepi55 Dec 28 '13 at 7:52

When you free a pointer, what happens to the memory allocated to it is undefined. It will not be cleared, it might be re-used and the content of the memory might be overwritten... or maybe not.

In your case, it seems that the memory stayed untouched between the moment you freed it and the moment you print it, but this might not be the case at every execution of your program or on every operating system.

void* realloc (void* ptr, size_t size) will copy the memory allocated at ptr, and copy it the a new memory region of size size. But what do you ant to achieve with realloc?

Is there any easier way to do all this in separate functions? can you be more specific on this ?

UPDATE (on comment) : you can refactor your two functions to have the same type of interface but to be usable in different contexts with the following prototypes :

// the functions take as a parameter an array of integers, an a pointer to an integer. It returns an array of transformed data and through the second parameter, the length of the output.
int* findDividers(int input, int* output_length) {
    int* dividers = malloc(input * sizeof(int));
    int found_dividers = 0;
    // do things
    int* tmp = realloc(dividers, found_dividers);
    free(dividers);

    *output_length = found_dividers;
    return tmp;
}

int* primeFilter(int* input, int input_length, int* output_length) { /* same structure as before */ }

// you can then use it as follow
int integer_to_process = 0xdeadbeef;

int dividers_count = 0;
int* dividers = findDividers(integer_to_process, &dividers_count);

int primes_count = 0;
int* primes = primeFilter(dividers, dividers_count, &prime_count);

// now feel free to use the two arrays, with a minimal length, as you want.
share|improve this answer
    
I want to use realloc() to add one more "length" to the divResult so I won't have to allocate asizeof(int) (which in this case, is unnecessary much memory allocation) Also I want the division() function and the primes() function to be separate functions. I have seen cases where the division() and primes() are put in one function, which is not what I want. –  pepi55 Dec 20 '13 at 11:22
    
thanks for the detailed information –  pepi55 Dec 28 '13 at 7:51
  • Why is it still returning the values of division() even though I have "freed" the memory of divResult? Accessing the contents of a freed memory block is Undefined Behavior, anything can happen. In most implementations, if the memory hasn't been reused for anything else, you'll be able to see the old values. But you can't depend on it, because you don't know when the memory will be reassigned.

  • How can I get realloc() to work? Don't free the memory if you still need it. As long as the memory is allocated, you can use realloc() to shrink or expand it. But make sure you update all the pointers to the memory, since realloc() can move the memory around.

  • Is there any easier way to do all this in separate functions? This is a very broad question.

share|improve this answer
    
As I said in a previous comment, I want to be able to calculate the division numbers of a number and the primes to a number in separate functions –  pepi55 Dec 20 '13 at 11:26
    
Why don't you pass the divResult to primes as an argument? –  Barmar Dec 20 '13 at 11:32
    
Or primes can call division. BTW, the word you're looking for is "factors", not "division numbers". –  Barmar Dec 20 '13 at 11:33
    
thanks for the help guys English is not my main language thats why I have some trouble naming things. Also I dont know why I myself haven't thought of using it as an argument... –  pepi55 Dec 28 '13 at 7:55

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