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I have template struct declared as:

template <bool sel_c>
struct A
{
    A(){/*...*/}
    enum{
        is_straight = sel_c
    };
    typedef A<sel_c> this_t;
    typedef A<!sel_c> oposit_t;

    A(const this_t& copy){/*...*/}
    A(const oposit_t& copy){/*...*/}
    ~A(); //will be specialized latter for true/false

    template <class T> //this is my pain !
    void print(T& t);
};

How can I declare specializations of both print methods?

I have already tried following (with error: error C2244: 'A::print' : unable to match function definition to an existing declaration )

template <class T>
void A<false>::print(T& t)
{
    /*...*/
}

And following (with error that no copy constructor declared early above):

template <> struct A<false>
{
    ~A()
    {
        /*...*/
    }
    template <class T>
    void print(T& t)
    {
       /*...*/
    }
};
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
template<>
template< class T >
void A<false>::print( T& t ) {}
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I don't see any problem with your second solution, the following compiles just fine with g++:

template <bool sel_c>
struct A
{
    A(){/*...*/}
    enum{
        is_straight = sel_c
    };
    typedef A<sel_c> this_t;
    typedef A<!sel_c> oposit_t;

    A(const this_t& copy){/*...*/}
    A(const oposit_t& copy){/*...*/}
    ~A(); //will be specialized latter for true/false

    template <class T> //this is my pain !
    void print(T& t);
};

template <>
struct A<false>
{
    ~A(){};

    template <class T>
    void print(T& t) {}
};

template <>
struct A<true>
{
    ~A(){};

    template <class T>
    void print(T& t) {}
};


int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    A<false> a1;
    A<true> a2;
}

EDIT: this is incomplete, see comments

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At least my g++ (GCC) 4.5.3 reports about error that I've not declared copy constructor for code A<false>(A<false>()) - this happens because fully re-declaration of entire class, that erases previous info about valid constructors –  Dewfy Dec 20 '13 at 11:44
    
Interesting, I have used g++ 4.6.3, but I don't think this should make any difference –  dkrikun Dec 20 '13 at 11:55
1  
just add to your source code lines: A<true> a; A<true> a2(a); A<false> b(a); this forces compiler to locate constructors that are ignored without such lines –  Dewfy Dec 20 '13 at 11:57

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