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I am having 4 strings:

"h:/a/b/c"
"h:/a/b/d"
"h:/a/b/e"
"h:/a/c"

I want to find the common prefix for those strings, i.e. "h:/a". How to find that?

Usually I'd split the string with delimiter '/' and put it in another list, and so on.
Is there any better way to do it?

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do you mean you want to find any strings that are common for all; or that there will only be one string common for all? –  Andras Zoltan Jan 15 '10 at 8:48
1  
h:/ is a drive? limit the data input can give you a better answer that fits your need. –  joetsuihk Jan 15 '10 at 8:48
1  
I have clarified the question to how I understand it. Please rollback if this is wrong. –  dtb Jan 15 '10 at 8:50
    
Andras, i want one string common for all.. –  user251334 Jan 15 '10 at 8:51
4  
The longest common prefix is h:/a/ –  user102008 Sep 27 '11 at 3:40
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6 Answers

string[] xs = new[] { "h:/a/b/c", "h:/a/b/d", "h:/a/b/e", "h:/a/c" };

string x = string.Join("/", xs.Select(s => s.Split('/').AsEnumerable())
                              .Transpose()
                              .TakeWhile(s => s.All(d => d == s.First()))
                              .Select(s => s.First()));

with

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Transpose<T>(
    this IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> source)
{
    var enumerators = source.Select(e => e.GetEnumerator()).ToArray();
    try
    {
        while (enumerators.All(e => e.MoveNext()))
        {
            yield return enumerators.Select(e => e.Current).ToArray();
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        Array.ForEach(enumerators, e => e.Dispose());
    }
}
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will this work only if they are separated by "/"? –  Sam Holder Jan 15 '10 at 9:08
    
If you remove the Split it works with individual characters as well. –  dtb Jan 15 '10 at 9:15
2  
A clever functional approach! Thanks for the contribution, dtb -- it's always fun reading your take. –  John Feminella Jan 15 '10 at 9:34
1  
hey it is showing error in the transpose method... tell me the namespaces to include.. –  user251334 Jan 15 '10 at 9:35
1  
There is no Transpose method in the .NET framework. I used the following implementation; had to change one the First calls to FirstOrDefault to make it work though: extensionmethod.net/Details.aspx?ID=152 –  dtb Jan 15 '10 at 9:38
show 6 more comments

Just loop round the characters of the shortest string and compare each character to the character in the same position in the other strings. Whilst they all match keep going. As soon as one doesn't match then the string up to the current position -1 is the answer.

Something like (pseudo code)

int count=0;
foreach(char c in shortestString)
{
    foreach(string s in otherStrings)
    {
        if (s[count]!=c)
        {
             return shortestString.SubString(0,count-1); //need to check count is not 0 
        }
    }
    count+=1;
 }
 return shortestString;
share|improve this answer
    
but if i have some 20 strings.. do u think the comparison of the shortest with others char by char is effecient? –  user251334 Jan 15 '10 at 8:56
2  
If you only have 20 strings I don't think you need to worry about efficiency, but I'm not sure what more you can do as you need to check every string to make sure they are the same. you might be able to do it better if you know if the strings likely to be common for some amount. –  Sam Holder Jan 15 '10 at 9:03
    
@deepasundari - If you need to find the first different character in the strings, then the minimum number of characters you can compare is the ones that are the same at the start in each string, plus one that is different in one string. So this is provably the most efficient algorithm to find a common prefix. –  Greg Beech Jan 15 '10 at 9:06
    
Hey thanks yaar.. it was very useful –  user251334 Jan 15 '10 at 9:19
    
no problem. I would be interested in a profiled comparison with dtb's answer, that might be more efficient on a multiple processor machine. You should also accept an answer. –  Sam Holder Jan 15 '10 at 9:26
add comment

Working code based on Sam Holder's solution (note it gives h:/a/ not h:/a as the longest common initial substring in the question):

using System;

namespace CommonPrefix
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(CommonPrefix(new[] { "h:/a/b/c", "h:/a/b/d", "h:/a/b/e", "h:/a/c" })); // "h:/a/"
            Console.WriteLine(CommonPrefix(new[] { "abc", "abc" })); // "abc"
            Console.WriteLine(CommonPrefix(new[] { "abc" })); // "abc"
            Console.WriteLine(CommonPrefix(new string[] { })); // ""
            Console.WriteLine(CommonPrefix(new[] { "a", "abc" })); // "a"
            Console.WriteLine(CommonPrefix(new[] { "abc", "a" })); // "a"

            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        private static string CommonPrefix(string[] ss)
        {
            if (ss.Length == 0)
            {
                return "";
            }

            if (ss.Length == 1)
            {
                return ss[0];
            }

            int prefixLength = 0;

            foreach (char c in ss[0])
            {
                foreach (string s in ss)
                {
                    if (s.Length <= prefixLength || s[prefixLength] != c)
                    {
                        return ss[0].Substring(0, prefixLength);
                    }
                }
                prefixLength++;
            }

            return ss[0]; // all strings identical
        }
    }
}
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This is the longest common substring problem (although it's a slightly specialized case since you appear to only care about the prefix). There's no library implementation of the algorithm in the .NET platform that you can call directly, but the article linked here is chock-full of steps on how you'd do it yourself.

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i dont think that logic will work out here... i just want to trace from first and stop when the difference comes –  user251334 Jan 15 '10 at 8:54
    
I gave this a +1 because the original question did not ask for a prefix, it just asked for the common substring (presumably we were supposed to infer if was a prefix from the data, but it was not what was asked). –  Greg Beech Jan 15 '10 at 9:08
2  
Given that only a common prefix is searched, the general longest common substring algorithm would be a terrible overkill (O(n^2) vs. O(n) for only two strings ...). The problem is NOT a "slightly specialized case" but a much easier to solve one :-). Usually, I would give -1 (in order to bring the correct answer up), but given that the question was rephrased, I'll just leave it :-) ... –  MartinStettner Jan 15 '10 at 9:28
3  
@MartinStettner I don't think you should vote down answers to bring the answer you consider correct up. You should down vote answers you think are wrong, and upvote answers you think are correct. If enough people agree with you the answers will rise to the top naturally. The correct answer will be at the top, assuming it is marked as accepted. –  Sam Holder Jan 15 '10 at 9:45
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I wanted a common string prefix, except I wanted to include any character (like /) and I did not want something performant/fancy just something I can read with tests. So I have this: https://github.com/fschwiet/DreamNJasmine/commit/ad802611ceacc673f2d03c30f7c8199f552b586f

public class CommonStringPrefix
{
    public static string Of(IEnumerable<string> strings)
    {
        var commonPrefix = strings.FirstOrDefault() ?? "";

        foreach(var s in strings)
        {
            var potentialMatchLength = Math.Min(s.Length, commonPrefix.Length);

            if (potentialMatchLength < commonPrefix.Length)
                commonPrefix = commonPrefix.Substring(0, potentialMatchLength);

            for(var i = 0; i < potentialMatchLength; i++)
            {
                if (s[i] != commonPrefix[i])
                {
                    commonPrefix = commonPrefix.Substring(0, i);
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

        return commonPrefix;
    }
}
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Here is a custom implementation of the trie algorithm in c# (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trie). It is used to perform an indexed string via prefixes. This class has O(1) write and reads for leaf nodes. For prefix searches, the performance is O(log n), however the count of results for prefix is O(1).

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

public class StringIndex
{
    private Dictionary<char, Item> _rootChars;

    public StringIndex()
    {
        _rootChars = new Dictionary<char, Item>();
    }

    public void Add(string value, string data)
    {
        int level = 0;
        Dictionary<char, Item> currentChars = _rootChars;
        Item currentItem = null;

        foreach (char c in value)
        {
            if (currentChars.ContainsKey(c))
            {
                currentItem = currentChars[c];
            }
            else
            {
                currentItem = new Item() { Level = level, Letter = c };
                currentChars.Add(c, currentItem);                
            }

            currentChars = currentItem.Items;

            level++;
        }

        if (!currentItem.Values.Contains(data))
        {
            currentItem.Values.Add(data);
            IncrementCount(value);
        }
    }

    private void IncrementCount(string value)
    {
        Dictionary<char, Item> currentChars = _rootChars;
        Item currentItem = null;

        foreach (char c in value)
        {
            currentItem = currentChars[c];
            currentItem.Total++;
            currentChars = currentItem.Items;
        }
    }

    public void Remove(string value, string data)
    {
        Dictionary<char, Item> currentChars = _rootChars;
        Dictionary<char, Item> parentChars = null;
        Item currentItem = null;

        foreach (char c in value)
        {
            if (currentChars.ContainsKey(c))
            {
                currentItem = currentChars[c];
                parentChars = currentChars;
                currentChars = currentItem.Items;
            }
            else
            {
                return; // no matches found
            }
        }

        if (currentItem.Values.Contains(data))
        {
            currentItem.Values.Remove(data);
            DecrementCount(value);
            if (currentItem.Total == 0)
            {
                parentChars.Remove(currentItem.Letter);
            }
        }
    }

    private void DecrementCount(string value)
    {
        Dictionary<char, Item> currentChars = _rootChars;
        Item currentItem = null;

        foreach (char c in value)
        {
            currentItem = currentChars[c];
            currentItem.Total--;
            currentChars = currentItem.Items;
        }
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        _rootChars.Clear();
    }

    public int GetValuesByPrefixCount(string prefix)
    {
        int valuescount = 0;

        int level = 0;
        Dictionary<char, Item> currentChars = _rootChars;
        Item currentItem = null;

        foreach (char c in prefix)
        {
            if (currentChars.ContainsKey(c))
            {
                currentItem = currentChars[c];
                currentChars = currentItem.Items;
            }
            else
            {
                return valuescount; // no matches found
            }
            level++;
        }

        valuescount = currentItem.Total;

        return valuescount;
    }

    public HashSet<string> GetValuesByPrefixFlattened(string prefix)
    {
        var results = GetValuesByPrefix(prefix);
        return new HashSet<string>(results.SelectMany(x => x));
    }

    public List<HashSet<string>> GetValuesByPrefix(string prefix)
    {
        var values = new List<HashSet<string>>();

        int level = 0;
        Dictionary<char, Item> currentChars = _rootChars;
        Item currentItem = null;

        foreach (char c in prefix)
        {
            if (currentChars.ContainsKey(c))
            {
                currentItem = currentChars[c];
                currentChars = currentItem.Items;
            }
            else
            {
                return values; // no matches found
            }
            level++;
        }

        ExtractValues(values, currentItem);

        return values;
    }

    public void ExtractValues(List<HashSet<string>> values, Item item)
    {
        foreach (Item subitem in item.Items.Values)
        {
            ExtractValues(values, subitem);
        }

        values.Add(item.Values);
    }

    public class Item
    {
        public int Level { get; set; }
        public char Letter { get; set; }
        public int Total { get; set; }
        public HashSet<string> Values { get; set; }
        public Dictionary<char, Item> Items { get; set; }

        public Item()
        {
            Values = new HashSet<string>();
            Items = new Dictionary<char, Item>();
        }
    }
}

Here is the unit testing & example code for how to use this class.

using System;
using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;

    [TestClass]
    public class StringIndexTest
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void AddAndSearchValues()
        {

            var si = new StringIndex();

            si.Add("abcdef", "1");
            si.Add("abcdeff", "2");
            si.Add("abcdeffg", "3");
            si.Add("bcdef", "4");
            si.Add("bcdefg", "5");
            si.Add("cdefg", "6");
            si.Add("cdefgh", "7");

            var output = si.GetValuesByPrefixFlattened("abc");

            Assert.IsTrue(output.Contains("1") && output.Contains("2") && output.Contains("3"));
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void RemoveAndSearch()
        {

            var si = new StringIndex();

            si.Add("abcdef", "1");
            si.Add("abcdeff", "2");
            si.Add("abcdeffg", "3");
            si.Add("bcdef", "4");
            si.Add("bcdefg", "5");
            si.Add("cdefg", "6");
            si.Add("cdefgh", "7");

            si.Remove("abcdef", "1");

            var output = si.GetValuesByPrefixFlattened("abc");

            Assert.IsTrue(!output.Contains("1") && output.Contains("2") && output.Contains("3"));
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void Clear()
        {

            var si = new StringIndex();

            si.Add("abcdef", "1");
            si.Add("abcdeff", "2");
            si.Add("abcdeffg", "3");
            si.Add("bcdef", "4");
            si.Add("bcdefg", "5");
            si.Add("cdefg", "6");
            si.Add("cdefgh", "7");

            si.Clear();
            var output = si.GetValuesByPrefix("abc");

            Assert.IsTrue(output.Count == 0);
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void AddAndSearchValuesCount()
        {

            var si = new StringIndex();

            si.Add("abcdef", "1");
            si.Add("abcdeff", "2");
            si.Add("abcdeffg", "3");
            si.Add("bcdef", "4");
            si.Add("bcdefg", "5");
            si.Add("cdefg", "6");
            si.Add("cdefgh", "7");

            si.Remove("cdefgh", "7");

            var output1 = si.GetValuesByPrefixCount("abc");
            var output2 = si.GetValuesByPrefixCount("b");
            var output3 = si.GetValuesByPrefixCount("bc");
            var output4 = si.GetValuesByPrefixCount("ca");

            Assert.IsTrue(output1 == 3 && output2 == 2 && output3 == 2 && output4 == 0);
        }
    }

Any suggestions on how to improve this class are welcome :)

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