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A recent new jQuery version has been released, the jQuery v1.4. You can read all about it here. It allows you to do some pretty neat stuff such as:

$("div.test").bind({
  click: function(){
    $(this).addClass("active");
  },
  mouseenter: function(){
    $(this).addClass("inside");
  },
  mouseleave: function(){
    $(this).removeClass("inside");
  }
});

What do you like the most about this new version? What is the thing that made you go "FINALLY!"?


Added a bounty to get more feedback and accept an answer

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1  
definitely excited, not exited. –  mauris Jan 15 '10 at 8:52
    
corrected the title :) –  AutomatedTester Jan 15 '10 at 8:52
10  
@closers: I think it's a real question, it allows us to share what will be the next step of jQuery, of widely used framework here on SO. For instance I missed the part about delay() and I'm glad that Doug reminded me of it ! Plus it's cw, come on –  marcgg Jan 15 '10 at 9:00
5  
I second marcgg. I can't understand why people are trying to close it. It sounds like a perfectly valid question to me. –  missingfaktor Jan 15 '10 at 9:02
2  
I third marcgg (is it correct to say that? :P) , If he already have it as a community wiki, he had -pretty much- put the question on the super Untouchable safe side (SUSS), the question can be argumentative, subjective and a poll..and still be safe from closing or deleting! –  Madi D. Jan 15 '10 at 10:56
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closed as not constructive by casperOne Jan 18 '12 at 19:27

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15 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted
+50

Best feature in my opinion is allowing functions in setters:

jQuery('li.selected').html(function(i, li) {
   return "<strong>" + li + "</strong>";
});

A lot of code that required $.each can be removed now.

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1  
Could that also be jQuery('li.selected').wrapInner(<strong />) –  alex Jan 25 '10 at 5:30
    
see my comment on the answer bellow –  marcgg Jan 25 '10 at 11:11
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Believe it or not, the "FINALLY" moment for me was the addition of delay():

$("#notice").slideDown('500').delay(4000).slideUp('500'); // = Pure awesome :)
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4  
That's quite awesome indeed –  marcgg Jan 15 '10 at 10:10
3  
Isn't that just a wrapper for setTimeout? –  DisgruntledGoat Jan 21 '10 at 14:20
6  
@DisgruntledGoat, The fact that you can use it in method chaining like the example above though is a huge plus. –  GSto Jan 21 '10 at 22:48
1  
This should have been the question accepted. I don't know what went wrong ? –  marcgg Jan 25 '10 at 10:22
    
Ok this is the problem: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/18944/… ... Sorry about that :\ –  marcgg Jan 25 '10 at 11:11
show 1 more comment

The ability to create elements on the fly in a more terse manner, by passing all attributes as the second argument to jQuery():

jQuery('<div/>', {
    id: 'foo',
    mouseenter: function() {
        // do stuff
    },
    html: jQuery('<a/>', {
        href: 'http://google.com',
        click: function() {
            // do stuff
        }
    })
});

All non-attribute properties map to the corresponding jQuery method. So having html there will call .html() and having click will bind a new click event via .click()...

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3  
I always felt so torn between writing the raw HTML and calling attr() on the element after creation. This is much better :) –  Matchu Jan 20 '10 at 20:09
    
Why is $('<div/>', { id: 'foo' }) better than $('<div id="foo"/>')? They both work just fine, and the latter is shorter and easier to read and write. (Honest question; I really have no idea!) –  Mathias Bynens Feb 9 '10 at 9:55
2  
Mathias, the point is that values of attributes are often needed to be calculated. Compare: $('<div id="' + calcId() + '"/>') and $('<div/>', { id : calcId() }) –  thorn Feb 9 '10 at 20:18
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I don't really have a favorite, here's an overview of 15 new features for those who don't know what this is all about:

http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/javascript-ajax/jquery-1-4-released-the-15-new-features-you-must-know/

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I am a speed freak so any speed improvement is always welcomed by me

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+1'd for the incredibly speed improvements in 1.4!!! –  Jarrett Meyer Jan 23 '10 at 3:06
    
In particular find and append were amazing for me. –  Alex Bagnolini Feb 15 '10 at 12:54
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For me it was this:

"All Events Can Be Live Events"

"We’re very proud to count some addtional events amongst those supported by live(). 1.4 introduces cross-browser support for change, submit, focusin, focusout, mouseenter, and mouseleave via the event delegation in .live()."

I've been waiting for this on the change event for ages!

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I'm not sure what you mean, could you give an example ? –  marcgg Jan 15 '10 at 10:53
2  
The live function binds an event to a "selector", so that if you create new elements that match the selector, they get the event too. Previously it only worked with a handful of events like click and mouseover. Now it works for practically every event. –  DisgruntledGoat Jan 21 '10 at 14:29
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Well the performance improvements are of course something I appreciate, but I guess I can't say it's a "finally" since it's something that's subject to constant improvement :) The DOM-building (Quick Element Construction) syntax looks really convenient, and the detach method also looks quite usable: it allows you to temporarily remove an object from the DOM, but keeps all the handlers assigned to it, so that it'll work just the same way, when reinserted.

I guess there's not so much a lot of things that I've been missing, but now that these new features are out there, there's a bunch that I'm anxious to start using :)

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I really like delay() and detach() the most, to be honest. The performance improvements are a huge plus as well but delay() is probably the single most amazing part of it. Simple but ultra useful. No more setTimeouts().

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It has been very modular since 1.3+. For example, when you don't need the ajax library, it is nice to build without it. Keep file sizes down.

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Call me crazy, but just the added number of tests gives me a warm fuzzy feeling. I almost want to upvote every answer :)_

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I think unwrap() is simple, elegant, and you get an innerHTML present at the end!

The new unwrap method will take the children of a given parent and replace said parent with them. Like so:

<body>
    <div>
        <p>this</p> <p>is</p> <p>fun</p>
    </div>
</body>

$('div').unwrap();

<body>
   <p>this</p> <p>is</p> <p>fun</p>
</body>
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$.proxy()

To make sure that this always means this rather than that...

Example from here

MyModule = function() {
  this.$div = $('#testdiv');
  this.myString = "Hi! I'm an object property!";

  this.$div.click($.proxy(this.handleClick, this));
};

MyModule.prototype.handleClick = function() {
  console.log(this.myString); // Hi! I'm an object property!
};

var m = new MyModule();
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For me, it's the ability to now write event handlers with the live() handler. I know that live was present in the last version (1.3.2) also, but it wasn't fully supported.

This makes the code infinitely simpler especially if you have most of the DOM being created on the fly or via Ajax requests.

More about live here: http://api.jquery.com/live/

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live() calls with events such as change is a big one for me. I have been wanting this for sometime now.

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