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What is the best way to approach removing items from a collection in C#, once the item is known, but not it's index. This is one way to do it, but it seems inelegant at best.

//Remove the existing role assignment for the user.
int cnt = 0;
int assToDelete = 0;
foreach (SPRoleAssignment spAssignment in workspace.RoleAssignments)
{
    if (spAssignment.Member.Name == shortName)
    {
        assToDelete = cnt;
    }
    cnt++;
}
workspace.RoleAssignments.Remove(assToDelete);

What I would really like to do is find the item to remove by property (in this case, name) without looping through the entire collection and using 2 additional variables.

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41  
Love the variable names. I'd hate to be the @ss that gets deleted, though. –  tvanfosson Oct 16 '08 at 0:56
    
Add a break statement on successful find if you plan to do this way, although using a Dictionary is probably better anyway if you always look things up by the member name. –  tvanfosson Oct 16 '08 at 0:57
    
I think you meant RemoveAt() in your code snippet, since you are passing in the index. Once the item is known, you may call Remove() directly. –  hurst Oct 16 '08 at 1:38
    
This question should be clarified. What .Net framework are the answers dealing with? Are we talking about List<T> or some other structure implementing IList<T> - This should probably be renamed to "What is the best way to remove items from a List<T> in .net 3.0?" –  Sam Saffron Oct 16 '08 at 6:20

13 Answers 13

up vote 19 down vote accepted

If you want to access members of the collection by one of their properties, you might consider using a Dictionary<T> or KeyedCollection<T> instead. This way you don't have to search for the item you're looking for.

Otherwise, you could at least do this:

foreach (SPRoleAssignment spAssignment in workspace.RoleAssignments)
{
    if (spAssignment.Member.Name == shortName)
    {
        workspace.RoleAssignments.Remove(spAssignment);
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This would cause an exception because you're modifying the collection as you're using it... –  RWendi Oct 16 '08 at 5:03
5  
No it doesn't. It's because there's a break after removing the item. –  jfs Oct 16 '08 at 5:29
13  
Jusst in case one reads this and applies it to a situation where one is removing multiple items, save the multiple indexes into an array and use a separate for-loop that loops backwards through the delete array to delete the items. –  Robert C. Barth Oct 17 '08 at 0:08

If RoleAssignments is a List<T> you can use the following code.

workSpace.RoleAssignments.RemoveAll(x =>x.Member.Name == shortName);
share|improve this answer
    
I think it's only RemoveAll that has the function parameter. At least, I can't build it with Remove. –  MichaelGG Oct 16 '08 at 1:06
3  
Yeah it's RemoveAll. I actually spent the time to check that, verified it was RemoveAll and still pasted in Remove. Too bad stackoverflow doesn't have a built-in compiler :) –  JaredPar Oct 16 '08 at 1:09
3  
AFAIK that's an in-place remove. –  Jon Limjap Oct 16 '08 at 6:34
2  
Yes, it's an inplace remove. –  JaredPar Oct 16 '08 at 6:54
10  
much better than the accepted answer... –  jeroenh May 27 '12 at 21:29

@smaclell asked why reverse iteration was more efficient in in a comment to @sambo99.

Sometimes it's more efficient. Consider you have a list of people, and you want to remove or filter all customers with a credit rating < 1000;

We have the following data

"Bob" 999
"Mary" 999
"Ted" 1000

If we were to iterate forward, we'd soon get into trouble

for( int idx = 0; idx < list.Count ; idx++ )
{
    if( list[idx].Rating < 1000 )
    {
        list.RemoveAt(idx); // whoops!
    }
}

At idx = 0 we remove Bob, which then shifts all remaining elements left. The next time through the loop idx = 1, but list[1] is now Ted instead of Mary. We end up skipping Mary by mistake. We could use a while loop, and we could introduce more variables.

Or, we just reverse iterate:

for (int idx = list.Count-1; idx >= 0; idx--)
{
    if (list[idx].Rating < 1000)
    {
        list.RemoveAt(idx);
    }
}

All the indexes to the left of the removed item stay the same, so you don't skip any items.

The same principle applies if you're given a list of indexes to remove from an array. In order to keep things straight you need to sort the list and then remove the items from highest index to lowest.

Now you can just use Linq and declare what you're doing in a straightforward manner.

list.RemoveAll(o => o.Rating < 1000);


For this case of removing a single item, it's no more efficient iterating forwards or backwards. You could also use Linq for this.

int removeIndex = list.FindIndex(o => o.Name == "Ted");
if( removeIndex != -1 )
{
    list.RemoveAt(removeIndex);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
For a simple List<T> if you need to remove more than 1 item, the reverse for loop is ALWAYS the most efficient way to do this. It is most certainly more efficient than copying the data into a listToRemove list. I bet the Linq implementation uses the same trick. –  Sam Saffron Oct 16 '08 at 4:57
    
@sambo99 I totally agree and attempt to expand on your answer, explaining why forward iteration doesn't always work. Also I indicate that, when given no extra information, reverse iterating is neither more nor less efficient if you are removing at most 1 entry. O(n) is as good as it gets with lists. –  Robert Paulson Oct 16 '08 at 5:23
    
Yerp. I'm correcting this now ... List<T> has a very nasty implementation of RemoveAt, the most efficient way seems to be copying the data we need out of the list –  Sam Saffron Oct 16 '08 at 5:26
    
Ah okay. That makes alot or sense thank you. –  smaclell Oct 16 '08 at 19:18
    
Imagine you want your data to be removed from left end (say you want to remove left most items but you dont know how many). Obviously reverse solution is the worst way to do so.... In your example instead of WHOOPSIE! you should have written list.RemoveAt(idx--); Alrigth? –  please delete me Mar 18 '10 at 1:35

For a simple List structure the most efficient way seems to be using the Predicate RemoveAll implementation.

Eg.

 workSpace.RoleAssignments.RemoveAll(x =>x.Member.Name == shortName);

The reasons are:

  1. The Predicate/Linq RemoveAll method is implemented in List and has access to the internal array storing the actual data. It will shift the data and resize the internal array.
  2. The RemoveAt method implementation is quite slow, and will copy the entire underlying array of data into a new array. This means reverse iteration is useless for List

If you are stuck implementing this in a the pre c# 3.0 era. You have 2 options.

  • The easily maintainable option. Copy all the matching items into a new list and and swap the underlying list.

Eg.

List<int> list2 = new List<int>() ; 
foreach (int i in GetList())
{
    if (!(i % 2 == 0))
    {
        list2.Add(i);
    }
}
list2 = list2;

Or

  • The tricky slightly faster option, which involves shifting all the data in the list down when it does not match and then resizing the array.

If you are removing stuff really frequently from a list, perhaps another structure like a HashTable (.net 1.1) or a Dictionary (.net 2.0) or a HashSet (.net 3.5) are better suited for this purpose.

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+1 because this syntax is simplest. –  Keith May 27 '11 at 3:21

What type is the collection? If it's List, you can use the helpful "RemoveAll":

int cnt = workspace.RoleAssignments
                      .RemoveAll(spa => spa.Member.Name == shortName)

(This works in .NET 2.0. Of course, if you don't have the newer compiler, you'll have to use "delegate (SPRoleAssignment spa) { return spa.Member.Name == shortName; }" instead of the nice lambda syntax.)

Another approach if it's not a List, but still an ICollection:

   var toRemove = workspace.RoleAssignments
                              .FirstOrDefault(spa => spa.Member.Name == shortName)
   if (toRemove != null) workspace.RoleAssignments.Remove(toRemove);

This requires the Enumerable extension methods. (You can copy the Mono ones in, if you are stuck on .NET 2.0). If it's some custom collection that cannot take an item, but MUST take an index, some of the other Enumerable methods, such as Select, pass in the integer index for you.

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If it's an ICollection then you won't have a RemoveAll method. Here's an extension method that will do it:

    public static void RemoveAll<T>(this ICollection<T> source, 
                                    Func<T, bool> predicate)
    {
        if (source == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("source", "source is null.");

        if (predicate == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("predicate", "predicate is null.");

        source.Where(predicate).ToList().ForEach(e => source.Remove(e));
    }

Based on: http://phejndorf.wordpress.com/2011/03/09/a-removeall-extension-for-the-collection-class/

share|improve this answer
    
Provided the requirement are to remove more than one item from the collection, this is the best way to go about doing it. –  Xeaz Nov 20 at 8:43

Here is a pretty good way to do it

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/555972

System.Collections.ArrayList arr = new System.Collections.ArrayList(); arr.Add("1"); arr.Add("2"); arr.Add("3");

        /*This throws an exception
        foreach (string s in arr)
        {
            arr.Remove(s);
        }
        */

        //where as this works correctly
        Console.WriteLine(arr.Count);
        foreach (string s in new System.Collections.ArrayList(arr)) 
        {
            arr.Remove(s);
        }
        Console.WriteLine(arr.Count);
        Console.ReadKey();
share|improve this answer

There is another approach you can take depending on how you're using your collection. If you're downloading the assignments one time (e.g., when the app runs), you could translate the collection on the fly into a hashtable where:

shortname => SPRoleAssignment

If you do this, then when you want to remove an item by short name, all you need to do is remove the item from the hashtable by key.

Unfortunately, if you're loading these SPRoleAssignments a lot, that obviously isn't going to be any more cost efficient in terms of time. The suggestions other people made about using Linq would be good if you're using a new version of the .NET Framework, but otherwise, you'll have to stick to the method you're using.

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A lot of good responses here; I especially like the lambda expressions...very clean. I was remiss, however, in not specifying the type of Collection. This is a SPRoleAssignmentCollection (from MOSS) that only has Remove(int) and Remove(SPPrincipal), not the handy RemoveAll(). So, I have settled on this, unless there is a better suggestion.

foreach (SPRoleAssignment spAssignment in workspace.RoleAssignments)
                        {
                            if (spAssignment.Member.Name != shortName) continue;
                            workspace.RoleAssignments.Remove((SPPrincipal)spAssignment.Member);
                            break;
                        }
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2  
You're still better off with my other suggestion of using FirstOrDefault. things.Remove(things.FirstOrDefault(t=>t.Whatever==true)) –  MichaelGG Oct 20 '08 at 20:17

To do this while looping through the collection and not to get the modifying a collection exception, this is the approach I've taken in the past (note the .ToList() at the end of the original collection, this creates another collection in memory, then you can modify the existing collection)

foreach (SPRoleAssignment spAssignment in workspace.RoleAssignments.ToList()) { if (spAssignment.Member.Name == shortName) { workspace.RoleAssignments.Remove(spAssignment); } }

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for some reason I do not have the editor buttons and cannot format the code appropriately –  Anthony Shaw May 7 '12 at 19:49

This is my generic solution

public static IEnumerable<T> Remove<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, Func<T, bool> match)
    {
        var list = items.ToList();
        for (int idx = 0; idx < list.Count(); idx++)
        {
            if (match(list[idx]))
            {
                list.RemoveAt(idx);
                idx--; // the list is 1 item shorter
            }
        }
        return list.AsEnumerable();
    }

It would look much simpler if extension methods support passing by reference ! usage:

var result = string[]{"mike", "john", "ali"}
result = result.Remove(x => x.Username == "mike").ToArray();
Assert.IsTrue(result.Length == 2);

EDIT: ensured that the list looping remains valid even when deleting items by decrementing the index (idx).

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That is not a working solution! You are skipping items both at the end and in the middle of the list! Try for example var result = string[]{"mike", "mike", "john", "ali", "mike"}, only the first "mike" will be removed. –  flindeberg May 21 '12 at 8:25
    
@flindeberg I wonder what you mean by "skipping" since the loop is passing over all items ?! ... but I will try your data –  Jalal El-Shaer May 24 '12 at 6:38
    
When you increase your index (idx) after removing an element your are skipping the "next" element. Ex: If you remove element at position 4, position 5 will be "moved" to position 4, position 6-> position 5, (n) -> (n - 1) etc, and then you increase your index to 5, where you will find (old 6, new 5), and you have skipped (old 5, new 4). Does this clarify things? –  flindeberg May 25 '12 at 7:48
    
Very well, I updated my answer... thanks for noticing that ;) –  Jalal El-Shaer May 27 '12 at 21:27

My solution would be something like this:

workspace.RoleAssignments.ToList().RemoveAll(role => role.Member.Name == shortName);
share|improve this answer
    
That's (almost) a copy paste from the solution presented on this questions 4.5 years ago by @JaredPar . –  P-L Mar 28 '13 at 18:38
    
Except calling ToList() creates a copy. So it's not an in-place remove. –  Colin Apr 17 '13 at 11:13

Similar to Dictionary Collection point of view, I have done this.

Dictionary<string, bool> sourceDict = new Dictionary<string, bool>();
sourceDict.Add("Sai", true);
sourceDict.Add("Sri", false);
sourceDict.Add("SaiSri", true);
sourceDict.Add("SaiSriMahi", true);

var itemsToDelete = sourceDict.Where(DictItem => DictItem.Value == false);

foreach (var item in itemsToDelete)
{
    sourceDict.Remove(item.Key);
}

Note: Above code will fail in .Net Client Profile (3.5 and 4.5) also some viewers mentioned it is Failing for them in .Net4.0 as well not sure which settings are causing the problem.

So replace with below code (.ToList()) for Where statement, to avoid that error. “Collection was modified; enumeration operation may not execute.”

var itemsToDelete = sourceDict.Where(DictItem => DictItem.Value == false).ToList();

Per MSDN From .Net4.5 onwards Client Profile are discontinued. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc656912(v=vs.110).aspx

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