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I need to distribute some code that was written in Python for Windows. Unfortunately, this code has many dependencies, and I'd like to make the installation as user-friendly as possible (read: doable even for people who don't even know how to use the command line). Is there a way I can build an installer which at he same time installs Python and the uses pip/easy_install to install the required modules as well? Can I package all this in a single executable, or do I need at least a second installation script? Thanks a lot.

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pip-installer.org/en/latest/cookbook.html You can use a requirements file listing all the modules needed. pip will then install everything listed –  M4rtini Dec 20 '13 at 15:25

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you just want an installer/binary, check out py2exe

http://www.py2exe.org/

There are a few known problems if your code includes certain resources but there is help for ensuring the includes worked http://www.py2exe.org/index.cgi/WorkingWithVariousPackagesAndModules

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Thanks, looks very good! Do you know if all dependencies need to be listed as imports in the setup.py file or if py2exe just finds them on its own? –  Okarin Dec 20 '13 at 15:42
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It should find common modules base don your imports. However, there are the known libraries it has trouble dealing with in that link above and you will have to add options to your setup.py file to deal with those. Once you have the exe, you just use any old packager you can find if you want a nice installer to go with it. –  dnlbmn Dec 20 '13 at 15:59
    
Ah, yeah, there's Scipy and Numpy in there. Dang, but I will figure out how to make them work, I guess. Thanks a lot! –  Okarin Dec 21 '13 at 10:36

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