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The knockout website has a great example of adding and removing list items using a foreach binding, but how would you update these values? I've tried doing so in the following fiddle, but the DOM elements do not respond to my update: http://jsfiddle.net/SC5Lw/1/

<ul data-bind="foreach: people">
    <li>
        Name at position <span data-bind="text: $index"> </span>:
        <span data-bind="text: name"> </span>
        <a href="#" data-bind="click: $parent.removePerson">Remove</a>
        <a href="#" data-bind="click: $parent.updatePerson">Update</a>
    </li>
</ul>

var person1 = ko.observable({ name: 'Bert' });
var person2 = ko.observable({ name: 'Charles' });
var person3 = ko.observable({ name: 'Denise' });

self.people = ko.observableArray([person1, person2, person3]);

...

self.updatePerson = function(person) {
    for(var i = 0 ; i < self.people.length ; i++)
    {
        if(self.people[i].name === person.name)
        {
            self.people[i].name = 'Bob';
        }
    }
};

I've made the elements of the observableArray into observables themselves, so I'm not sure why the elements they are bound to don't react to changing the property in the view model.

share|improve this question
    
Show your HTML with your bindings – Matt Burland Dec 20 '13 at 16:28
up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you need to do is create a class for people with a ko.observable called name. That's not what you've done here. You've made person1 and observable, but it contains an object literal with a normal property called name.

Something like this:

function Person(name) {
    var self = this;
    self.name = ko.observable(name);
}

Now in your parent VM:

var person1 = new Person('Bert');
var person2 = new Person('Charles');
var person3 = new Person('Denise');

self.people = ko.observableArray([person1, person2, person3]);

Here's a working fiddle.

Also, I wouldn't bother with your loop to find the matching person. You already have the person, so just change it's property right there.

So instead of this (which doesn't work anyway because people is a function, not a property):

self.updatePerson = function(person) {
    for(var i = 0 ; i < self.people.length ; i++)
    {
        if(self.people[i].name === person.name)
        {
            self.people[i].name = 'Bob';
        }
    }
};

You can just do:

self.updatePerson = function(person) {
    person.name("Bob");
}

You could even make this cleaner by moving this function to your Person view model and doing it there:

function Person(name) {
    var self = this;
    self.name = ko.observable(name);
    self.updateMe = function() {
        self.name("Bob");
    }
}

Which avoids having to bind $parent in your foreach loop:

    <a href="#" data-bind="click: updateMe">Update</a>

Here's a fiddle with those updates too.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have this working in JSFiddle? I can't seem to get it to work: jsfiddle.net/SC5Lw/3 – user3123391 Dec 20 '13 at 16:40
    
@user3123391: Yes, I added a fiddle. You had a bunch of other problems that needed fixing too. Especially when you are using an observableArray, you can't do myObservableArray.length, because myObservableArray is a function. You need myObservableArray().length. – Matt Burland Dec 20 '13 at 16:43
    
Working with ko.observableArray can sometimes trip you up, because some functions that you'd usually find on a regular array (e.g. push, remove) work directly, but with some (length or even indexing the array) you need to get the underlying array for. So myObservableArray.push(item) works just fine, but myObservableArray[0] does not. You need myObservableArray()[0]. And worse, myObservableArray().push(item) won't work because you've by-passed the observable part!! – Matt Burland Dec 20 '13 at 16:49
    
Thanks! I'm still getting used to everything observable being a function. Coming from a C# background that gets a little confusing. – user3123391 Dec 20 '13 at 16:50
    
@user3123391: Yeah, it takes a while to get used to. It's because property getters and setters aren't supported in older browsers. – Matt Burland Dec 20 '13 at 16:51

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