Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've run into an R-programming problem that I can't seem to wrap my head around. I have data like the following:

data = data.frame("start"=c(1,2,4,5),
                  "length"=c(2,2,2,3),
                  "decision"=c("yes","no","yes","yes"))

Which looks like:

  start length decision
1     1      2      yes
2     2      2       no
3     4      2      yes
4     5      3      yes

Row one stands for a sequence of integers that start at 1 for length 2 (1,2). Row 3 is 2 integers starting at 4 (4,5). I'm looking for intersections between entries that have a 'yes' decision variable. When the decision variable is 'no', then the sequence is thrown out. Here's what I've attempted so far.

I think I need to create a sequence list first.

sequence.list = lapply(seq(dim(data)[1]),
                       function(d){
                         seq(data$start[d],(data$start[d]+data$length[d]-1),by=1)
                         })

This outputs:

sequence.list
[[1]]
[1] 1 2

[[2]]
[1] 2 3

[[3]]
[1] 4 5

[[4]]
[1] 5 6 7

Which is a start. Then I create a list that counts intersections between items on my list (I stole this idea from another post on here).

count.intersect = lapply(sequence.list,function(a) {
  sapply(seq(length(sequence.list)), 
         function(b) length(intersect(sequence.list[[b]], a)))
  })

This creates the list:

 count.intersect
[[1]]
[1] 2 1 0 0

[[2]]
[1] 1 2 0 0

[[3]]
[1] 0 0 2 1

[[4]]
[1] 0 0 1 3

The way to read this is that entry 1 in the data frame has 2 trivial intersections with itself and 1 intersection with entry 2.

Here's where I get fuzzy on what to do. Make it a matrix?

intersect.matrix = do.call(rbind,count.intersect)

Then set the rows and columns of non-used entries to zero?

intersect.matrix[,data$decision=="no"]=0
intersect.matrix[data$decision=="no",]=0

intersect.matrix
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    2    0    0    0
[2,]    0    0    0    0
[3,]    0    0    2    1
[4,]    0    0    1    3

Now, I would like to return indices 3 and 4 somehow. I want to find the rows (or columns) containing non zeros that are also not on the diagonal.

Sorry for posting the whole procedure, I also want to know if there is a shorter way to go from the starting dataframe to finding intersections in used entries.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since you are not interested in non zero values on the diagonal, first I would subtract them away:

diag.mat <- diag(intersect.matrix) * diag(ncol(intersect.matrix)

which gives:

intersect.matrix - diag.mat
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    0    0    0    0
[2,]    0    0    0    0
[3,]    0    0    0    1
[4,]    0    0    1    0

Then identify which of the columns still hold non zero entries using which:

which(colSums(intersect.matrix - diag.mat) != 0)
[1] 3 4
share|improve this answer

You asked whether there is a short way to go from your data frame data to the indices. Here it is.

(Note: This may be hard to understand if you're new to R.)

1) Create the sequence list:

sequence.list <- apply(data[1:2], 1, function(x) seq_len(x[2]) + x[1] - 1)
# [[1]]
# [1] 1 2
# 
# [[2]]
# [1] 2 3
# 
# [[3]]
# [1] 4 5
# 
# [[4]]
# [1] 5 6 7

2) Count intersects and create the intersect matrix

intersect.matrix <- outer(s <- seq_along(sequence.list), s, 
                          Vectorize(function(a, b) 
                            length(Reduce(intersect, sequence.list[seq(a, b)]))))
#      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
# [1,]    2    1    0    0
# [2,]    1    2    0    0
# [3,]    0    0    2    1
# [4,]    0    0    1    3

3) Set cells corresponding to "no" to zero

idx <- data$decision == "no"
intersect.matrix[idx, ] <- intersect.matrix[ , idx] <- 0
#      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
# [1,]    2    0    0    0
# [2,]    0    0    0    0
# [3,]    0    0    2    1
# [4,]    0    0    1    3

4) Find indices of non-zero rows/columns (except diagonal)

result <- which(as.logical(colSums("diag<-"(intersect.matrix, 0))))
# [1] 3 4
share|improve this answer
    
@nfmcclure Right. I corrected it and also omitted the which in the line above. –  Sven Hohenstein Dec 20 '13 at 20:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.