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I wrote a simple search API using MVC that I can query from JQuery. Right now my code looks something like:

    $.ajax({
        url: 'api/search',
        type: "POST",
        data: paramString,
        dataType: "json",
        success: function(data) {
            $('#dataTable').append('<tr>' + '<td>' + params.SearchString + '</td>' + '<td>' + params.DateFrom + '</td>' + '<td>'+ params.DateTo + '</td>' + '<td>'+ JSON.stringify(data) + '</td>' + '</tr>');
        }
    });

Basically all I do is send the search criteria to the API, get the results back, and then write the relevant criteria and the search result to a new row in a results table, directly to HTML.

For obvious reasons I don't like this solution much; it doesn't actually put the data in any sort of data structure, it just drops it in the HTML, making it difficult to manipulate it in the future, and doesn't do a good job of following the basic design principles of MVC.

I'm trying to refactor it such that the call to the API returns nothing and adds the search result to a list in the ViewModel, that I can then display dynamically.

However I can't figure out an intelligent way of getting the model to the API controller. It's stored server side so I don't think I have to pass it through the view via javascript, but I can't come up with a better way.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
I think your best bet is to have your service return JSON and then output that anyway you like within your view. –  user1477388 Dec 20 '13 at 19:36
2  
You can't "add the search result to a list in the view model" because once the ajax response is served (and indeed once the page loads) the view model no longer exists. –  Ant P Dec 20 '13 at 19:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you're using API through ajax, my approach would be to return json, and then use mustache templates to make the data look good.

$.ajax({
    url: 'api/search',
    type: "POST",
    data: paramString,
    dataType: "json",
    success: function(data) {
        var template = $('#searchTpl').html();
        var html = Mustache.to_html(template, data);
        $('#dataTable').append('<tr><td>' + params.SearchString + '</td><td>' + params.DateFrom + '</td><td>'+ params.DateTo + '</td><td>'+ html + '</td></tr>');
    }
});

And if your json would look like;

{
    results: [
    {
        pageName : "Header of hit 1",
        pageDescription: "Description of page",
        searchHitUrl: "http://stackoverflow.com"
    },
    {
        pageName : "Header of hit 2",
        pageDescription: "Description of page",
        searchHitUrl: "http://imdb.com"
    }]
};

The template is defined as follows in index.html:

<script id="searchTpl" type="text/template">
{{#results}}
    <h3>{{pageName}}</h3>
    <p>{{pageDescription}} <a href="{{searchHitUrl}}">{{searchHitUrl}}</a></p>
{{/results}}
</script>
share|improve this answer

What you're looking for is client-side MVC, and is exactly why I ditched ASP.NET MVC in favour of AngularJS + ASP.NET Web API. I hated returning HTML fragments in response to AJAX requests, but had no easy way of binding JSON without writing lots of messy, unstructured jQuery. There are plenty of other options too such as Backbone, KnockoutJS, Mustache.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you find this works well for large-scale applications? I've been looking into all of these lately, but question how well they scale. Maybe not the best place to ask... –  statue Dec 20 '13 at 20:55
    
Well we've only been using it to build internal apps used by hundreds (rather than thousands) of users. Things we would have traditionally implemented as Windows forms apps, so it's hard to speak from experience. In terms of server side, it's just API calls, so it all depends on your API implementation: caching, etc. On the client, Angular deals with caching of view templates and also has support for easily caching other long-lasting data. You tend to just see calls to the API rather than full page loads, so it's very responsive. –  natwallbank Dec 21 '13 at 7:55
    
We have seen the odd performance issue on the client when binding large amounts of data, e.g. huge lists, but have usually been able to design around that. There are performance improvements with each new release, with some big plans in the roadmap for improving things further. –  natwallbank Dec 21 '13 at 8:03
    
Thanks! I'll have to look into it more and make a project or two with it. –  statue Dec 21 '13 at 16:51

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