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I'm looking for a good way to draw cylinder on opengl, i tried to draw multiple circles

for (GLuint m = 0; m <= segments; ++m) {
    for (GLuint n = 0; n <= segments; ++n) {
        GLfloat const t = 2 * M_PI * (float) n / (float) segments;
        //position
        points[num++] = x + sin(t) * r;
        points[num++] = .0005 * m;
        points[num++] = y + cos(t) * r;
        //color
        points[num++] = 1;
        points[num++] = 1;
        points[num++] = 1;
        //texture
        points[num++] = sin(t) * 0.5 + 0.5;
        points[num++] = cos(t) * 0.5 + 0.5;
    }
}

and on display function

GLuint pointer = 0;
for (GLuint i = 0; i <= segments; ++i) {
 glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLE_FAN, pointer, segments + 1);
 pointer += segments + 1;
}

I'm asking if there is a direct way to draw this cylinder

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1  
The question isn't very clear to me. What do you mean by drawing a cylinder "directly"? If you're asking if you can ask OpenGL to draw primitives like circles without decomposing them into triangles, the answer is generally "no". –  aardvarkk Dec 20 '13 at 21:54
    
you'll also want a triangle strip for the mantle, you can reuse the locations for the outer disks you have now –  ratchet freak Dec 20 '13 at 21:54
    
If your cylinder is already decomposed into triangles, I'd recommend you just use indexed vertices to draw it (look at glDrawElements). You'll just create a list of all of your vertices (with no duplication), and then just draw the triangles by providing the relevant indices. –  aardvarkk Dec 20 '13 at 21:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

drawing many discs one on top of the other is too slow (unless you really want to draw the cylinder as slices of discs)

You should just draw the sides of the cylinder. For example a quad mesh would be

// for (GLuint m = 0; m <= segments; ++m)
float const bottom = .0005f * 0.f;
float const top    = .0005f * (segments-1.f);
for(GLuint n = 0; n <= segments; ++n)
{
    GLfloat const t0 = 2 * M_PI * (float)n / (float)segments;
    GLfloat const t1 = 2 * M_PI * (float)(n+1) / (float)segments;
    //quad vertex 0
    points[num++] = x + sin(t0) * r;
    points[num++] = bottom;
    points[num++] = y + cos(t0) * r;
    //quad vertex 1
    points[num++] = x + sin(t1) * r;
    points[num++] = bottom;
    points[num++] = y + cos(t1) * r;
    //quad vertex 2
    points[num++] = x + sin(t1) * r;
    points[num++] = top;
    points[num++] = y + cos(t1) * r;
    //quad vertex 3
    points[num++] = x + sin(t0) * r;
    points[num++] = top;
    points[num++] = y + cos(t0) * r;
}

You can add 2 disks (the bases) to close the cylinder.

You can reduce fetching vertices form memory using a vertex+index buffer. In new versions of OGL you can eliminate vertex memory read by indexing the mesh using gl_VertexID

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"discrete version of the cylinder" makes it sound like all polyhedra are cylinder shaped. It's like saying a polygon is a discrete version of a circle; while it might be true in some cases, most polygons don't look particularly circular. –  bcrist Dec 20 '13 at 22:57
    
@bcrist I see what you mean. I'll stick with the word cylinder to avoid confusion. thanks –  a.lasram Dec 21 '13 at 1:57

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