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If I have a dict whose keys are numpy float64 numbers, how do I can access them by key value?

>>> keys = np.arange(0, 0.5, 0.05, dtype=np.float64)
>>> keys
    array([...,  0.3 ,  ...])

    # The following creates a dicionary lookup table
    # data[x] = exp(x) for all x in keys

>>> data = {key: np.exp(key) for key in keys}
>>> data[0.3]
    KeyError: 0.3
>>> data[np.float64(0.3)]
    KeyError: 0.29999999999999999
>>> data.keys()
[..., 0.30000000000000004, ...]

Do numpy floats even have the capability to be used as keys to a dict?

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4  
Using floats as dict keys is brave... –  seberg Dec 20 '13 at 23:00
    
Using floats as dict keys is semantically how one thinks of a mapping between one value and another. The real calculation I am doing is not the sort of thing you want to have to do each time you want a value. Is there a more elegant way to create a map? –  Sam Dec 20 '13 at 23:06
    
Why not just store the results as an array? –  Andy Hayden Dec 20 '13 at 23:07
    
"The real calculation I am doing is not the sort of thing you want to have to do each time you want a value." What is the calculation you're doing? If you're already using numpy, then you should try to take advantage of numpy's vectorization. –  wflynny Dec 20 '13 at 23:11
1  
Instead of thinking of it as a key lookup, think of it as an interpolation problem. –  DSM Dec 20 '13 at 23:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

From the comment, "The real calculation I am doing is not the sort of thing you want to have to do each time you want a value. Is there a more elegant way to create a map?"

This is a standard problem, and the general solution is known as a Lookup Table or LUT. The are many implementations, with and without numpy and scipy, that you can find by searching. Here's a solution that uses scipy's interpolation methods.

As others have said, using floating point numbers as dictionary keys is problematic. Plus, using a LUT, you can also interpolate between two pre-calculated solutions, which can increase accuracy, etc.

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