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I have the following code:

public int Method(MyEnum myEnum)
{
    switch (myEnum)
    {
        case MyEnum.Value1: return 1;
        case MyEnum.Value2: return 2;
        case MyEnum.Value3: return 3;
    }
}

public enum MyEnum
{
    Value1,
    Value2,
    Value3
}

And I get the error: "Not all code paths return a value". I do not understand how that switch statement could ever not jump to one of the specified cases.

Can an enum somehow be null?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

There's nothing to say that the value of myEnum will be one of those values.

Don't mistake enums for being a restrictive set of values. It's really just a named set of values. For example, I could call your method with:

int x = Method((MyEnum) 127);

What would you want that to do? If you want it to throw an exception you can do that in a default case:

switch (myEnum)
{
    case MyEnum.Value1: return 1;
    case MyEnum.Value2: return 2;
    case MyEnum.Value3: return 3;
    default: throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
}

Alternatively you could use Enum.IsDefined upfront, if you want to do some other work before the switch statement. That has the disadvantage of boxing... there are some ways round that, but they're generally more work...

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Aha.... That explains a lot. I'm used to Java enums. –  Matthijs Wessels Jan 15 '10 at 12:38
    
@JonSkeet: Could you please point to an example of how to avoid boxing in such situations? Thanks in advance. –  Raheel Khan Jul 24 at 13:07
    
@RaheelKhan: See code.google.com/p/unconstrained-melody for one example. –  Jon Skeet Jul 24 at 13:19

Enums are not limited to values they represent. You can assign this:

MyEnum v = (MyEnum)1000;

And there would be no problem at all. Add a default to your switch and you'll handle all possible situations.

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If you change the values in your enum (adding a fourth) your code will break. You should add a default: case to your switch statement.

of course, the other way to achieve this would be to define the integer values in your enum...

public enum MyEnum
{
    Value1 = 1,
    Value2 = 2,
    Value3 = 3
}

and then cast your enum as an int in code. Instead of int myInt = Method(myEnumValue); you can use int myInt = (int)myEnum

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1  
Thats not quite correct, see the other answers. –  NickLarsen Jan 15 '10 at 12:23
    
The fact that my code breaks if I change it is not the compilers business right? –  Matthijs Wessels Jan 15 '10 at 12:36
    
Not directly, no, but if you extend my answer with the others listed below you'll see the issue. Bottom line -> add a default case to the code. –  ZombieSheep Jan 15 '10 at 13:16

It has to be either:

public int Method(MyEnum myEnum)
{
    switch (myEnum)
    {
        case MyEnum.Value1: return 1;
        case MyEnum.Value2: return 2;
        case MyEnum.Value3: return 3;
        default: return 0;
    }
}

or:

public int Method(MyEnum myEnum)
{
    switch (myEnum)
    {
        case MyEnum.Value1: return 1;
        case MyEnum.Value2: return 2;
        case MyEnum.Value3: return 3;
    }

    return 0;
}
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or you can throw an exception in the case that the Enum is not a valid value, or any other handling case he desires. –  NickLarsen Jan 15 '10 at 12:24
MyEnum blah = 0;

Default is always 0 and is implicitly convertible, even if you do not have one with a 0 value.

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You are missing the default case:

public int Method(MyEnum myEnum)
{
    switch (myEnum)
    {
        case MyEnum.Value1: return 1;
        case MyEnum.Value2: return 2;
        case MyEnum.Value3: return 3;
        default: return 0; // Or whatever
    }
}
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