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I've been using sets quite a lot.

>>> s1
set(['a', 'b'])

Use of the methods allow for type conversion, while overloaded operators do not.

>>> s1.issubset('abc')
True
>>> s1 <= 'abc'
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: can only compare to a set
>>> s1 <= set('abc')
True

I want to be able to unite a set with a union to another set in a function:

>>> s1 | set('bc') # returns the union without modifying either
set(['a', 'c', 'b'])

>>> s1.union('bc') # allows for type conversion.
set(['a', 'c', 'b'])

It seems my best options for a function that does this are:

def add_elements_strict(collector_set):
    do_stuff()
    return collector_set | more_elements()

or like this.

def add_elements_from_any_iterable(collector_set):
    do_stuff()
    return collector_set.union(more_elements())

Which would be the better choice? Clearly the first would give a TypeError if given anything but a set, but the second would give greater flexibility. My questions:

Do I gain anything from ensuring I'm always passing this function a set?

Is the flexibility of being able to pass any iterable worth it?

share|improve this question
    
What about the update method of sets? –  BrenBarn Dec 21 '13 at 6:26
    
Well, I need some setup things going on that I'm doing, and I don't have my code in front of me at the moment. But that sort of misses the points of my questions. –  Aaron Hall Dec 21 '13 at 6:28
1  
Do you want to be able to pass an arbitrary iterable? Are you going to pass anything other than a set? It's kind of tough to answer your question the way you've put it. The advantage of ensuring it's a set is you will get a loud warning if it isn't. Whether the flexibility is "worth it" depends on what else you're doing with the other things. –  BrenBarn Dec 21 '13 at 6:30
    
so make that an answer –  Aaron Hall Dec 21 '13 at 6:31
    
Also, if your question is really just the end, I don't really understand why all the rest of your question is there. It seems like your question is just "what is the reason to use | vs update?", and your code examples have a lot of details that you don't actually care about. –  BrenBarn Dec 21 '13 at 6:37

2 Answers 2

Do you want to be able to pass an arbitrary iterable? Are you going to pass anything other than a set? It's kind of tough to answer your question the way you've put it. The advantage of ensuring it's a set is you will get a loud warning if it isn't. Whether the flexibility is "worth it" depends on what else you're doing with the other things. If the things you're going to be unioning are sets that you need to manipulate as sets in their own right, might as well leave them as sets. If they're always going to be lists and/or tuples because you're using them as lists/tuples in other contexts, then maybe it makes sense to accept any iterable.

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You can use set.update for an in-place update which returns an union

Quoting from the docs

Update the set, adding elements from all others.

Example

>>> s1 = set('a')
>>> s1.update('ba')
>>> s1
set(['a', 'b'])
share|improve this answer
    
If I wanted to use .update() I would have asked about update versus |= –  Aaron Hall Dec 21 '13 at 6:34

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