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<?php
class abhi
{
    var $contents="default_abhi";

    function abhi($contents)
    {
        $this->$contents = $contents;
    }

    function get_whats_there()
    {
        return $this->$contents;
    }

}

$abhilash = new abhi("abhibutu");
echo $abhilash->get_whats_there();

?>

i've initialized variable contents a default and also constructor, why is the value not printing, anything i should correct here?

see the error,

abhilash@abhilash:~$ php5 pgm2.php 

Fatal error: Cannot access empty property in /home/abhilash/pgm2.php on line 13
abhilash@abhilash:~$ 
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7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You are returning the variable incorrectly inside the function. It should be:

return $this->contents
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What Extrakun means is that you don't include the $ when setting or accessing an object's variables. –  nness Jan 15 '10 at 14:19
    
the assignment as well. –  falstro Jan 15 '10 at 14:19
2  
There's actually another problem, too... the echo statement requires a dollar sign before the abhilash variable name. –  Narcissus Jan 15 '10 at 14:26
    
As a further explanation why it is valid syntax, you can store a function name into a variable and invoke it by putting the brackets behind it, which is why PHP complains it as an 'empty property' –  Extrakun Jan 15 '10 at 14:32
    
@Narcissus: Ooops! My bad, that got lost when I added the formatting.. –  falstro Jan 15 '10 at 15:36

Since the question is tagged as "php5" here's an example of your class with php5 class notation (i.e. public/protected/private instead of var, public/protected/private function, __construct() instead of classname(), ...)

class abhi {
  protected $contents="default_abhi";

  public function __construct($contents) {
    $this->contents = $contents;
  }

  public function get_whats_there() {
    return $this->contents;
  }
}

$abhilash = new abhi("abhibutu");
echo $abhilash->get_whats_there();
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+1 I was about to write the same... I was too slow. –  Felix Kling Jan 15 '10 at 14:29
    
Is there any reason to re-assign contents in the constructor? I know the original poster did, but is there a value to it? –  Tom Jan 15 '10 at 14:40
    
@Tom: You can set contents at runtime via $a = new abhi('new content') –  Felix Kling Jan 15 '10 at 15:08
    
@Tom: Not really in this case. But fi another class extends abhi and its constructor doesn't call abhi::__construct() $contents will at least be set to "default_abhi" which might be sufficient in some cases. –  VolkerK Jan 15 '10 at 17:27

If i recall correctly it would be

$this->contents = $contents;

not

$this->$contents = $contents;
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Should be accessing and writing to $this->contents not $this->$contents

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Also, are you not missing a dollar-sign in "echo abhilash->get_whats_there();"? ($abhilash->..)

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use $this->contents
i too at first had the same problem

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You have a problem with $: 1. when using $this-> you do not put $ between "->" and the variable name the "$" sign, so your $this->$contents should be $this->contents. 2. in your echo youforgot the $ when calling that function from the instantiated class.

So your correct code is:

<?php
class abhi
{
    var $contents="default_abhi";

    function abhi($contents)
    {
        $this->contents = $contents;
    }

    function get_whats_there()
    {
        return $this->contents;
    }

}

$abhilash = new abhi("abhibutu");
echo $abhilash->get_whats_there();

?>
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