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I'm trying to execute an private function from within the returned object. If I knew the name of the function ahead of time this is easy but in this case I won't know what functions are available. What I have is the a string with the name of the function to call. Is there a way to call these functions via a string?

function foo() {

  // some misc. chunk of valid javascipt code
  function bar() {
      console.log("hello");
  }
  // end misc. code

  // I would like to avoid doing this if I don't have to
  var executableFn = {};
  executableFn.test = function() {
    bar();
  }
  // end

  return {
    // This works but requires I know the name of the funciton ahead of time.
    // All I have is a string name of the function to call.
    funcRunner0: function() {
      bar();
    }, 
    // My ideal method for calling but does not work
    funcRunner1: function(functionName) {
      foo[functionName]();
    }, 
    // This works but I'm trying to avoid eval.  I'm not sure if this is not so bad
    funcRunner2: function(functionName) {
      var func = eval(functionName);
      func();
    },
    // This works.  I'm not sure if this is worse than funcRunner2 or the same;
    funcRunner3: function(functionName) {
      eval(functionName + "()");
    },
    // This works but requires the executableFn object which I would like to avoid if at all possible.
    funcRunner4: function(functionName) {
      executableFn[functionName]();
    }, 
  };
}

var bas = foo();

// This works but assumes I know the name of the function to call which I don't. 
bas.funcRunner0();
// This doesn't work
bas.funcRunner1("bar");
// This works
bas.funcRunner2("bar");
// This works
bas.funcRunner3("bar");
// This works but is not my ideal
bas.funcRunner4("test");

These are all the ways I have come up with to call this function. What do you think is the best way for me to call the bar function with a string? Thanks for you help.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My ideal method for calling but does not work

foo[functionName]();

Yes, that's trying to access a [public] property on the foo function. It would work with the "call" method, for example.

This works but I'm trying to avoid eval. I'm not sure if this is not so bad

var func = eval(functionName);
func();

This works. I'm not sure if this is worse than funcRunner2 or the same;

eval(functionName + "()");

Both are as bad as the other from evals perspective. Option 1 just does make it easier to work with arguments [which need not be dynamically evaluated].

This works but requires the exec object which I would like to avoid if at all possible.

exec[functionName]();

That's just the way to do it. Since exec is a local variable in the foo scope, you even have your privateness. It seems you have switched exec for publicObj as well

// I would like to avoid doing this if I don't have to
var publicObj = {};
publicObj.test = function() {
    bar();
}

The publicObj variable is, despite its name, not public - it's declared local with the var keyword! Btw, you could've simplified this to

var exec = {
    test: bar
};
share|improve this answer
    
Ya. that was a typo. Fixed. "That's just the way to do it." I guess that is what I'm trying to confirm. I just want to make sure there isn't some tricky way of calling the bar function with a string that I'm not thinking of. –  yodaisgreen Dec 21 '13 at 22:53

Why not make a private namespace (object) and use that instead of exec/eval?

function foo() {

    var private_ns = {
        bar : function() {
            console.log('bar', arguments);
        }
    };

    return {
        call_func: function(name) {
            if(name in private_ns) {
                var args = [].slice.call(arguments, 1)
                return private_ns[name].apply(null, args);
            } else {
                console.error('no such function');
            }
        }
    };
}

var f = foo();

> f.call_func('bar', 1, 2, 3);
bar { '0': 1, '1': 2, '2': 3 }

> f.call_func('noop');
no such function
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1  
+1 for showing an example where he can pass arguments to the function as well. –  Hallvar Helleseth Dec 21 '13 at 19:56
    
Yes. If I enforced rules on what code/structure was required I could do it this way. I am trying to see if there is a way to call functions without imposing any rules for how the code must be written. There is a way to call the function itself so I'm looking for a way to call a function if you have a string of its name. –  yodaisgreen Dec 21 '13 at 22:40
1  
It's not possible without eval then. –  OneOfOne Dec 22 '13 at 1:09

It's somewhat similar to your "not ideal" solution, but is a bit difference. If you organize all of your functions into an object, you can then call them. No need for another function within an object that calls the original function.

http://jsfiddle.net/L3n4Z/

function foo() {

    // all functions stored in this object
    var functions = {
        bar : function() {
          console.log("hello");
        }
    };

  return {
    funcRunner: function(funcName) {
      functions[funcName]();
    }
  };
}

var bas = foo();
bas.funcRunner("bar");
share|improve this answer
    
Yes. If I enforced that this is how the code had to be written then the solution is simple. I'm just just looking for some sneaky ninja way of not having to enforce some structure/rules. Thanks. –  yodaisgreen Dec 22 '13 at 0:05

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