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I'm attempting to run a PySide GUI in a spawned child process, but it keeps exiting with exitcode 11 (segfault). This simplified test code works fine if run_gui is called directly, but fails if it's run inside a child process:

# std lib imports
import time
import sys
from multiprocessing import Process

# third party imports
from PySide.QtGui import QApplication, QMainWindow


def run_gui():
    app = QApplication([])
    w = QMainWindow()
    w.show()
    w.raise_()
    sys.exit(app.exec_())


def main():
    gui_proc = Process(target=run_gui)
    #gui_proc.daemon = True # this doesn't seem to matter
    gui_proc.start()
    while True:
        if not gui_proc.is_alive():
            if gui_proc.exitcode != 0:
                print 'GUI exited with code {}'.format(gui_proc.exitcode)
            else:
                print 'GUI exited cleanly.'
            break
        time.sleep(1)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    ## GUI in main process:
    #run_gui()
    ## GUI in child process:
    main()

Is there a way around this? I'm not sure how to debug what's causing the segfault.

The reason I'm interested in doing this is so that I can restart the GUI if it crashes unexpectedly, all the while keeping a couple daemon processes running (one for disk access and another for interacting with instruments).

Edit: I just tried another test script (below) using QCoreApplication and no GUI, and I see the same problem. Apparently PySide just won't run in a child process.

# std lib imports
import time
import sys
from multiprocessing import Process

# third party imports
from PySide.QtCore import QCoreApplication, QTimer

def quit():
    print "Quiting..."
    sys.exit()

def run():
    app = QCoreApplication([])
    timer = QTimer()
    timer.timeout.connect(quit)
    timer.start(1000)
    print "Starting..."
    sys.exit(app.exec_())

def main():
    proc = Process(target=run)
    #proc.daemon = True # this doesn't seem to matter
    proc.start()
    while True:
        if not proc.is_alive():
            print 'Process exited with code {}'.format(proc.exitcode)
            break
        time.sleep(1)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    ## GUI in main process:
    #run()
    ## GUI in child process:
    main()
share|improve this question
    
What platfrom are you on, and what versions of PySide and Qt are you using? I ran the second test in Linux (PySide 1.2.1, Qt 4.8.5) and WinXP (PySide 1.1.1, Qt 4.7.4), and it works fine (i.e. it exits with code 0). –  ekhumoro Dec 22 '13 at 19:47
    
Interesting. I'm on Mac OS X 10.9.1 using Python 2.7.3 64-bit, and PySide 1.1.1. Did the first test work also, or just the second? –  Scott Maddox Dec 23 '13 at 22:35
    
But what versions of PySide and Qt? And are you using Linux, Windows, OSX? Presumably, there must be some system-dependent reason why the example works for me, but not for you. Can you try the example using PyQt? –  ekhumoro Dec 23 '13 at 22:49
    
Both examples work for me on Linux and WinXP. It would be very useful if you could test on OSX with PyQt, as that would help narrow things down a lot if the emaples worked. I suppose another possibility would be to try upgrading to PySide-1.2.x. –  ekhumoro Dec 23 '13 at 23:56
    
Is running the GUI in separate process really the best option? It seems like if would be a pain to debug that way. Why not use sys.excepthook to trap unhandled errors, and couple it with something like faulthandler? That should provide enough control to be able to do a cleanup and restart within the same process. –  ekhumoro Dec 24 '13 at 0:04

1 Answer 1

I have had similar issues,

I chose to rearrange my code, so that data collection and analysis is running in process it self.

This was, I got a very simple Gui thread and plotting thread. If the gui for some reason stalled, I would still be able to sample my data "in time"

I don't like the Phrase

so that I can restart the GUI if it crashes unexpectedly

Basically if your gui crashes, you should fix the problem and not do a workaround.

share|improve this answer
    
I already have data collection working in a child process, but I would like to put the GUI in a child process as well. Due to the global interpreter lock, threads are not sufficient. I would love to write a bug free GUI, but I'm preparing for the worst and designing the application to be tolerant of bugs by separating data collection from presentation. I could completely decouple the two processes rather than using child processes, but then I would need to reimplement the features provided by multiprocessing.Pipe, which is nontrivial. –  Scott Maddox Dec 23 '13 at 22:21

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