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I find the follow code on internet for read and write a JPEG file using the library libjpeg.

I changed the function void write_JPEG_file (char * filename, int quality) to the following:

void write_JPEG_vetor (JSAMPLE * image_data, int height, int width, int quality)
{
  printf("%s\n","write_JPEG_vetor");
  /* This struct contains the JPEG compression parameters and pointers to
   * working space (which is allocated as needed by the JPEG library).
   * It is possible to have several such structures, representing multiple
   * compression/decompression processes, in existence at once.  We refer
   * to any one struct (and its associated working data) as a "JPEG object".
   */
  struct jpeg_compress_struct cinfo;
  /* This struct represents a JPEG error handler.  It is declared separately
   * because applications often want to supply a specialized error handler
   * (see the second half of this file for an example).  But here we just
   * take the easy way out and use the standard error handler, which will
   * print a message on stderr and call exit() if compression fails.
   * Note that this struct must live as long as the main JPEG parameter
   * struct, to avoid dangling-pointer problems.
   */
  struct jpeg_error_mgr jerr;
  /* More stuff */
  FILE * outfile;       /* target file */
  JSAMPROW row_pointer[1];  /* pointer to JSAMPLE row[s] */
  int row_stride;       /* physical row width in image buffer */

  printf ("%s\n","Step 1: allocate and initialize JPEG compression object */");

  /* We have to set up the error handler first, in case the initialization
   * step fails.  (Unlikely, but it could happen if you are out of memory.)
   * This routine fills in the contents of struct jerr, and returns jerr's
   * address which we place into the link field in cinfo.
   */
  cinfo.err = jpeg_std_error(&jerr);
  /* Now we can initialize the JPEG compression object. */
  jpeg_create_compress(&cinfo);

  printf ("%s\n","/* Step 2: specify data destination (eg, a file) */");
  /* Note: steps 2 and 3 can be done in either order. */

  /* Here we use the library-supplied code to send compressed data to a
   * stdio stream.  You can also write your own code to do something else.
   * VERY IMPORTANT: use "b" option to fopen() if you are on a machine that
   * requires it in order to write binary files.
   */

  char * filename = {"novo_arquivo.jpeg"};

  if ((outfile = fopen(filename, "wb")) == NULL) {
    fprintf(stderr, "can't open %s\n", filename);
    exit(1);
  }
  jpeg_stdio_dest(&cinfo, outfile);

  printf ("%s\n","/* Step 3: set parameters for compression */");

  /* First we supply a description of the input image.
   * Four fields of the cinfo struct must be filled in:
   */
  cinfo.image_width = width;    /* image width and height, in pixels */
  cinfo.image_height = height;
  cinfo.input_components = 3;       /* # of color components per pixel */
  cinfo.in_color_space = JCS_RGB;   /* colorspace of input image */
  /* Now use the library's routine to set default compression parameters.
   * (You must set at least cinfo.in_color_space before calling this,
   * since the defaults depend on the source color space.)
   */
  jpeg_set_defaults(&cinfo);
  /* Now you can set any non-default parameters you wish to.
   * Here we just illustrate the use of quality (quantization table) scaling:
   */
  jpeg_set_quality(&cinfo, quality, TRUE /* limit to baseline-JPEG values */);

  printf ("%s\n","/* Step 4: Start compressor */");

  /* TRUE ensures that we will write a complete interchange-JPEG file.
   * Pass TRUE unless you are very sure of what you're doing.
   */
  jpeg_start_compress(&cinfo, TRUE);

  printf ("%s\n","/* Step 5: while (scan lines remain to be written) */");
  /*           jpeg_write_scanlines(...); */

  /* Here we use the library's state variable cinfo.next_scanline as the
   * loop counter, so that we don't have to keep track ourselves.
   * To keep things simple, we pass one scanline per call; you can pass
   * more if you wish, though.
   */
  row_stride = width * 3;   /* JSAMPLEs per row in image_buffer */

  while (cinfo.next_scanline < cinfo.image_height) {
    printf ("%s\n","Loop WHILE");
    /* jpeg_write_scanlines expects an array of pointers to scanlines.
     * Here the array is only one element long, but you could pass
     * more than one scanline at a time if that's more convenient.
     */

    row_pointer[0] = &image_data[cinfo.next_scanline * row_stride];
    (void) jpeg_write_scanlines(&cinfo, row_pointer, row_stride);
  }

  printf ("%s\n","/* Step 6: Finish compression */");

  jpeg_finish_compress(&cinfo);
  /* After finish_compress, we can close the output file. */
  fclose(outfile);

  printf ("%s\n","/* Step 7: release JPEG compression object */");

  /* This is an important step since it will release a good deal of memory. */
  jpeg_destroy_compress(&cinfo);

  /* And we're done! */
}

Now, when I run the program (in a Linux enviroment), I am receiving an error Segmentation Fault. Someone can tell why this is happening? My main suspect is the code:

while (cinfo.next_scanline < cinfo.image_height) {
    printf ("%s\n","Loop WHILE");
    /* jpeg_write_scanlines expects an array of pointers to scanlines.
     * Here the array is only one element long, but you could pass
     * more than one scanline at a time if that's more convenient.
     */

    row_pointer[0] = &image_data[cinfo.next_scanline * row_stride];
    (void) jpeg_write_scanlines(&cinfo, row_pointer, row_stride);
  }

but i'm not sure about that, and can't find a solution to solve this, despite spend a good time trying.

=== UPDATE === I included the follow debugging code in this part of the code:

while (cinfo.next_scanline < cinfo.image_height) {
    printf ("%s\n","Loop WHILE");
    /* jpeg_write_scanlines expects an array of pointers to scanlines.
     * Here the array is only one element long, but you could pass
     * more than one scanline at a time if that's more convenient.
     */

    printf ("%s\n","parte 1.1");
    row_pointer[0] = &image_data[cinfo.next_scanline * row_stride];
    printf ("%s\n","parte 1.2");
    printf ("%s\n","parte 2.1");
    (void) jpeg_write_scanlines(&cinfo, row_pointer, 1);
    printf ("%s\n","parte 2.2");
  }

And this way the output when running the programa is:

Loop WHILE
parte 1.1
parte 1.2
parte 2.1

=== UPDATE 2 === For the record, in my program, this function is receiving the return value of this function:

JSAMPLE * inverte_imagem()
{
  int tamanho = image_height*image_width*image_colors;
  int i;
  JSAMPLE * vetor = malloc(sizeof(JSAMPLE)*(image_height*image_width*image_colors));
  for( i=0; i<tamanho; i++)
    vetor [i] = image_buffer [tamanho - (i+1)];
}
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For this you use the debugger and see what's wrong and why.\ –  bmargulies Dec 22 '13 at 1:36

2 Answers 2

This looks wrong:

(void) jpeg_write_scanlines(&cinfo, row_pointer, row_stride);

That last parameter is the number of lines to write, not the row length. You probably want:

(void) jpeg_write_scanlines(&cinfo, row_pointer, 1);
share|improve this answer
    
ok, i change again this line (that was my first try) and the error still happening. Put some debugging code in this part of the code (see UPDATE above) and appears the problem is with the line. –  Kleber Mota Dec 22 '13 at 12:30
    
By the way, when I include the debug line "printf ("%s\n",&image_data[cinfo.next_scanline * row_stride]);" after the first printf, the program shows "parte 1.1" and crashes. Maybe the problem can be with the variable image_data? –  Kleber Mota Dec 22 '13 at 12:34
    
Does image_colors have the value 3 in inverte_imagem? –  Joe Z Dec 22 '13 at 18:29
    
@KleberMota : Hold on... that printf, shouldn't it be %p to print a pointer? %s is likely to crash anyway because what you're pointing to isn't guaranteed to have any 0s in it. –  Joe Z Dec 22 '13 at 19:08
up vote 0 down vote accepted

OK, I solve the problem putting the call for write_JPEG_vector inside the function inverte_imagem(). I don't know why, but when I make the call to this function from my main function, a memory problem (error segmentation fault on linux) occurs.

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