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Is there a way to remove a value from an array in pgSQL? Or to be more precise, to pop the last value? Judging by this list the answer seems to be no. I can get the result I want with an additional index pointer, but it's a bit cumbersome.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 10 down vote accepted

No, I don't think you can. At least not without writing something ugly like:

SELECT ARRAY (
 SELECT UNNEST(yourarray) LIMIT (
  SELECT array_upper(yourarray, 1) - 1
 )
)
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Judging from what Google tells me, it seems that I can't. I'll mark this as the accepted answer unless somebody proves you wrong :) – oggy Jan 15 '10 at 20:10

In version 9.3 and above you can do:

update users set flags = array_remove(flags, 'active')
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As of 2015, this is the most appropriate answer-- supposing you're running at least PostgreSQL 9.3. – Joshua Burns Apr 19 '15 at 18:45
    
For those of you who haven't been able to roll up to version 9.3+ yet, you should be able to do write your own array_remove() as shown: sqlfiddle.com/#!15/03d32/1/0 – SeldomNeedy Dec 8 '15 at 19:58

There IS a SIMPLE way to remove a value from an array in PLAIN SQL:

SELECT unnest('{5,NULL,6}'::INT[]) EXCEPT SELECT NULL

it will remove all NULL values from array. Result will be:

#| integer |
------------
1|    5    |
2|    6    |
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Users of version 9.3+ should see this answer. Users of version 9.2 and below can wrap up the above code for reuse like this: sqlfiddle.com/#!15/03d32/1/0 – SeldomNeedy Dec 8 '15 at 20:07

I'm not sure about your context, but this should give you something to work with:

CREATE TABLE test (x INT[]);
INSERT INTO test VALUES ('{1,2,3,4,5}');

SELECT x AS array_pre_pop,
       x[array_lower(x,1) : array_upper(x,1)-1] AS array_post_pop, 
       x[array_upper(x,1)] AS popped_value 
FROM test;


 array_pre_pop | array_post_pop | popped_value 
---------------+----------------+--------------
 {1,2,3,4,5}   | {1,2,3,4}      |            5
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Thanks, that would work though I guess slicing isn't exactly an efficient solution? – oggy Jan 15 '10 at 18:20
    
I think it's your best method considering there's no built-in function for pop(). Without knowing the specifics, I can't give better advice. If you want to loop through the contents for a particular record, then unnest() would probably be better as it would convert into a set of records. However, if you just want to update a table to remove all the "last elements" of the array in multiple records, array slicing would be the way to go. – Matthew Wood Jan 15 '10 at 18:29

The simplest way to remove last value:

array1 = array[1,2,3]
array1 = ( select array1[1:array_upper(array1, 1) - 1] )
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This should be the accepted answer. – Lucian Feb 14 '14 at 16:54

Here is a function I use for integer[] arrays

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION array_remove_item (array_in INTEGER[], item INTEGER)
RETURNS INTEGER[]
LANGUAGE SQL
AS $$
SELECT ARRAY(
  SELECT DISTINCT $1[s.i] AS "foo"
    FROM GENERATE_SERIES(ARRAY_LOWER($1,1), ARRAY_UPPER($1,1)) AS s(i)
   WHERE $2 != $1[s.i]
   ORDER BY foo
);
$$;

This is obviously for integer arrays but could be modified for ANYARRAY ANYELEMENT

=> select array_remove_item(array[1,2,3,4,5], 3);
-[ RECORD 1 ]-----+----------
array_remove_item | {1,2,4,5}
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I've created a array_pop function so you can remove an element with known value from an array.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION array_pop(a anyarray, element character varying)
RETURNS anyarray
LANGUAGE plpgsql
AS $function$
DECLARE 
    result a%TYPE;
BEGIN
SELECT ARRAY(
    SELECT b.e FROM (SELECT unnest(a)) AS b(e) WHERE b.e <> element) INTO result;
RETURN result;
END;
$function$ 

there is also a gist version https://gist.github.com/1392734

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I'm running on 9.2 and I'm able to execute this:

update tablename set arrcolumn=arrcolumn[1:array_length(arrcolumn)-1];

or you can shift off the front element with the same kind of thing:

update tablename set arrcolumn=arrcolumn[2:array_length(arrcolumn)];

Careful, programmers -- for some reason still unknown to science, pgsql arrays are 1-indexed instead of 0-indexed.

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Try this:

update table_name set column_name=column_name[1:array_upper(column_name, 1)-1];
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My function for all types of arrays.

Outer function:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION "outer_array"(anyarray, anyarray) RETURNS anyarray AS $$
    SELECT
        "new"."item"
    FROM (
        SELECT
            ARRAY(
                SELECT
                    "arr"."value"
                FROM (
                    SELECT
                        generate_series(1, array_length($1, 1)) AS "i",
                        unnest($1)                              AS "value"
                ) "arr"
                WHERE
                    "arr"."value" <> ALL ($2)
                ORDER BY
                    "arr"."i"
            ) AS "item"
    ) "new"
    $$
LANGUAGE sql
IMMUTABLE
RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
;

Inner function:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION "inner_array"(anyarray, anyarray) RETURNS anyarray AS $$
    SELECT
        "new"."item"
    FROM (
        SELECT
            ARRAY(
                SELECT
                    "arr"."value"
                FROM (
                    SELECT
                        generate_series(1, array_length($1, 1)) AS "i",
                        unnest($1)                              AS "value"
                ) "arr"
                WHERE
                    "arr"."value" = ANY ($2)
                ORDER BY
                    "arr"."i"
            ) AS "item"
    ) "new"
$$
LANGUAGE sql
IMMUTABLE
RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
;
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