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I have read this answer by Ragzitsu for the same question. I am still confused how to implement things though. Can somebody give me an example of an implementation.

I have the following classes:

class Fizz : IFizz
{
}

class Buzz : IBuzz
{

}

class Bar : IBar
{

}

class Foo : IFoo
{
    public Foo(IBar bar, IFizz fizz, IBuzz buzz)
    {
        //initialize etc.
    }

    //public methods
}

What is the practical way to get around the constructor here? I want to do something like

var foo = new Mock<IFoo>();

In other words how would the code look after the advice

The best thing to do would be right click on your class and choose Extract interface.

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I don't understand what you are trying to do here? Can you explain? –  Adarsh Shah Dec 22 '13 at 18:25

5 Answers 5

You should not change anything if you have an interface IFoo and want to mock Foo class that has constructor with parameters.

Your code is exactly what you need.

var foo = new Mock<IFoo>();

The following advice covers the situations when the class has no interface and no parameterless constructor. Actually you can pass all needed parameters into constructor of Mock.

var mock = new Mock<IFoo>("constructor", "arguments");

but

"The best thing to do would be right click on your class and choose Extract interface." (c)

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Interfaces are useful when one type has more than one implementation. On a negative side, this means that you should take care not to derive interfaces just because you want interfaces (common mistake). On a positive side, mocked interface is the second implementation by definition.

So, the conclusion is - if a type acts as some other type's dependency, then it is a good candidate to implement an interface. In that case you will be able to mock the interface in unit tests freely and fully.

On a related note, when defining an interface, make sure to only add functional parts to the interface: methods that define what the object does, not what it looks like. Having an interface with a bunch of getters/setters does not add value to the design. This is quite large area of theory, and this tiny window is not the place to write more about it.

To clarify connection with your question: mocked implementation should provide behavior required by the interface. To do that, you use features of the mocking framework. This has nothing to do with concrete implementation of the Foo class - you define specific behavior of Mock object.

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If you go to tests your FOo class, you don´t need to mock. You only need to mock those classes which depends of the class that you are trying to tests.

Something like:

Mock<IBar> bar = new Mock<IBar>();
Mock<IBuzz> buzz = new Mock<IBuzz>();
Mock<IFizz> fizz= new Mock<IFizz>();

Foo foo = new Foo(bar.Object, buzz.Object, fizz.Object);

Then call the method in foo that you want to test ;)

If the method in foo uses some method inside bar/fuzz or fizz, then you should use the sintax like:

buzz.Setup(x => x.DoSomething()).Returns(1);

This way when your foo method is called, it will call the DoSomething and always will return 1 ;)

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This is kind of an old post but I just ran into a similar problem (starting out with Moq). In case anyone else has a similar problem, here is what I had:

class Bar : IBar
{
}

class Foo : IFoo
{
    public Foo(IBar bar)
    {
        //initialize etc.
    }

    //public methods
}

class Manager : IManager
{
    public Manager(Foo foo)
    {
        //initialize etc
    }
}

What I'm trying to do is test Manager not Foo.

Here was my initial test code that threw an Error.

[TestFixture]
public class ManagerTest
{
    [Test]
    public void SomeTest()
    {
        var fooMock = Mock<IFoo>();
        var managerUnderTest = new Manager(fooMock.Object);
    }
}

The error is Castle.DynamicProxy.InvalidProxyConstructorArgumentsException : Can not instantiate proxy of class: Something.Models.Foo. Could not find a parameterless constructor.

Reading the Error message, Moq doesn't understand how to instantiate Foo, since there is no parameterless constructor, and we don't tell Moq how to instantiate one with parameters. Change that second section to:

[TestFixture]
public class ManagerTest
{
    [Test]
    public void SomeTest()
    {
        var barMock = Mock<IBar>();
        var fooMock = Mock<IFoo>(barMock.Object);
        var managerUnderTest = new Manager(fooMock.Object);

        //proceed with test
    }
}
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The best thing to do would be right click on your class and choose Extract interface.

I'm going to address this concept in an orthogonal sense. I disagree with this statement, an interface is not the solution to the situtation in question.

Going back to the previous question's text:

public class CustomerSyncEngine {
    public CustomerSyncEngine(ILoggingProvider loggingProvider, 
                              ICrmProvider crmProvider, 
                              ICacheProvider cacheProvider) { ... }

    public void MethodWithDependencies() {
        loggingProvider.Log();
        crmProvider.Crm();
        cacheProvider.Cache();
    }
}

Note the method I added.

I believe the real question is when you are not specifically testing CustomerSyncEngine but instead are testing a class that depends on CustomerSyncEngine. Let's call this class SuperSyncEngine. Creating a test against SuperSyncEngine is going to be a pain since you have to mock out the entire CustomerSyncEngine with its 3 interfaces, along with any other additional dependencies SuperSyncEngine has.

Given that the code you are seeking to test is SuperSyncEngine that depends on CustomerSyncEngine an interface isn't the answer here. You could create ICustomerSyncEngine but that interface shouldn't be created merely for a mocking framework. The better solution is to change CustomerSyncEngine.MethodWithDependencies to be virtual

public virtual void MethodWithDependencies() {
    loggingProvider.Log();
    crmProvider.Crm();
    cacheProvider.Cache();
}

This would allow you to replace the method with a mocking framework ignoring the dependencies that CustomerSyncEngine comes with.

If you follow this approach you will likely need a default constructor exposed on CustomerSyncEngine to allow it to be mocked. It's possible you could work around that and satisfy the dependencies with null or some other values but that would be additional work when the goal is to reduce friction.

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