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Given a string, I'm trying to count the occurrence of each letter in the string and then sort their frequency from highest to lowest. Then, for letters that have similar number of occurrences, I have to sort them alphabetically.

So here's what I have been able to do so far:

  • created an int array of size 26 corresponding to the 26 letters of the alphabet with individual values representing the number of times it appeared in the sentence
  • pushed the contents of this array into a vector pair, v, of int and char. (int for the frequency, and char for the actual letter)
  • sorted this vector pair using std::sort(v.begin(), v.end());

In displaying the frequency count, I just used a for loop starting from the last index to display the result from highest to lowest. I am having problems, however, with regard to those letters having similar frequencies because I need them displayed in alphabetical order. I tried using a nested for loop with the inner loop starting with the lowest index and using a conditional statement to check if its frequency is the same as the outer loop. This seemed to work but my problem is that I can't seem to figure out how to control these loops so that redundant outputs will be avoided. To understand what I'm saying, please see this sample output:

Sample output:

Enter a string: hello world

Pushing the array into a vector pair v:
d = 1
e = 1
h = 1
l = 3
o = 2
r = 1
w = 1


Sorted first according to frequency then alphabetically:
l = 3
o = 2
d = 1
e = 1
h = 1
r = 1
w = 1
d = 1
e = 1
h = 1
r = 1
d = 1
e = 1
h = 1
d = 1
e = 1
d = 1
Press any key to continue . . .

As you can see, it would have been fine if it wasn't for the redundant outputs brought about by the incorrect for loops.

If you can suggest more efficient or better implementations with regard to my concern, then I would highly appreciate it as long as they're not too complicated or too advanced as I am just a C++ beginner.

If you need to see my code, here it is:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    cout<<"Enter a string: ";
    string input;
    getline(cin, input);

    int letters[26]= {0};

    for (int x = 0; x < input.length(); x++) {
        if (isalpha(input[x])) {
            int c = tolower(input[x] - 'a');
            letters[c]++;
        }
    }

    cout<<"\nPushing the array into a vector pair v: \n";
    vector<pair<int, char> > v;

    for (int x = 0; x < 26; x++) {
        if (letters[x] > 0) {
            char c = x + 'a';
            cout << c << " = " << letters[x] << "\n";
            v.push_back(std::make_pair(letters[x], c));
        }
    }

    //sort the vector pair
    std::sort(v.begin(), v.end());

    //Need help here!//
    cout<<"\n\nSorted first according to frequency then alphabetically: \n";
    for (int x = v.size() - 1 ; x >= 0; x--) {
        for (int y = 0; y < x; y++) {
            if (v[x].first == v[y].first) {
                cout << v[y].second<< " = " << v[y].first<<endl;
            }
        }
        cout << v[x].second<< " = " << v[x].first<<endl;
    }

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

Thanks!!

*UPDATE:* Hurray!! Thanks to the responses of the awesome people here at StackOverflow, I was finally able to fix my problem. Here is my final code in case anyone is interested or for future references of people who might be stuck in the same boat:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

struct Letters
{
    Letters() : freq(0){}
    Letters(char letter,int freq) {
        this->freq = freq;
        this->letter = letter;
    }
    char letter;
    int freq;
};

bool Greater(const Letters& a, const Letters& b)
{
    if(a.freq == b.freq)
        return a.letter < b.letter;

    return a.freq > b.freq;
}

int main () {

    cout<<"Enter a string: ";
    string input;
    getline(cin, input);

    vector<Letters> count;
    int letters[26]= {0};

    for (int x = 0; x < input.length(); x++) {
        if (isalpha(input[x])) {
            int c = tolower(input[x] - 'a');
            letters[c]++;
        }
    }

    for (int x = 0; x < 26; x++) {
        if (letters[x] > 0) {
            char c = x + 'a';
            count.push_back(Letters(c, letters[x]));
        }
    }

    cout<<"\nUnsorted list..\n";
    for (int x = 0 ; x < count.size(); x++) {
        cout<<count[x].letter<< " = "<< count[x].freq<<"\n";
    }

    std::sort(count.begin(),count.end(),Greater);

    cout<<"\nSorted list according to frequency then alphabetically..\n";
    for (int x = 0 ; x < count.size(); x++) {
        cout<<count[x].letter<< " = "<< count[x].freq<<"\n";
    }

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

and a sample output:

Enter a string: hello world

Unsorted list..
d = 1
e = 1
h = 1
l = 3
o = 2
r = 1
w = 1

Sorted list according to frequency then alphabetically..
l = 3
o = 2
d = 1
e = 1
h = 1
r = 1
w = 1
Press any key to continue . . .

I basically just followed @Oli Charlesworth advice of implementing a custom comparator through the help of this guide: A Function Pointer as Comparison Function.

Although I'm pretty sure that my code can still be made more efficient? Still, I'm pretty happy with the results. :)

Thanks again!!

share|improve this question
3  
You can solve this in a single step by running your sort with a custom comparator (see en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/algorithm/sort for an example). –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 22 '13 at 13:30
    
You could also use a map<char, int> –  Gabriel L. Dec 22 '13 at 13:46
    
@Oli Charlesworth, thanks for the hint. It really helped! –  makki Dec 22 '13 at 16:16
    
@Gabriel L., but even if I used a map, I still would not be able to sort its values directly, am I right? Thanks! –  makki Dec 22 '13 at 16:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want highest frequency then lowest letter, an easy way would be to store negative values for frequency, then negate it after you sort. A more efficient way would be to change the function used for sorting, but that is a touch trickier:

struct sort_helper {
   bool operator()(std::pair<int,char> lhs, std::pair<int,char> rhs) const{
     return std::make_pair(-lhs.first,lhs.second)<std::make_pair(-rhs.first,rhs.second);
   }
};
std::sort(vec.begin(),vec.end(),sort_helper());
share|improve this answer

You could simplify this a lot, in two steps:

  1. First use a map to count the number of ocurences of each character in the string:

    std::unordered_map<char,unsigned int> count;
    
    for( char character : string )
        count[character]++;
    
  2. Use the values of that map as comparison criteria:

    std::sort( std::begin( string ) , std::end( begin ) , 
               [&]( char lhs , char rhs )
               {
                   return count[lhs] < count[rhs];
               }
             ); 
    

Here is a working example running at ideone.

share|improve this answer

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