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Following zulu date string is given:

2013-12-18T23:41:54.959Z

And I want to convert this to GMT and retrieve the minutes using Joda-Time. I build following method:

public static int minutesFromDateString(final String s){
    DateTimeFormatter formatter = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("HH:mm").withZone(DateTimeZone.forID("Europe/Berlin"));
    DateTime dt = formatter.parseDateTime(s);

    Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
    calendar.setTime(dt.toDate());

    return calendar.get(Calendar.MINUTE);
}

However this returns an error:

12-22 16:04:11.940: E/AndroidRuntime(6433): java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Invalid format: "2013-12-18T23:41:54.959Z" is malformed at "13-12-18T23:41:54.959Z"

Any ideas whats wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You aren't using a valid pattern. Your pattern says it is looking for HH:mm, your real string is far more complex. Look at the DateTimeFormat docs. It looks like you want something like this: "yyyy-mm-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSS'Z'"

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Correct, format pattern is wrong. But actually, no format pattern is needed. A DateTime can take an ISO 8601 formatted string like that one directly in its constructor. DateTime dateTime = new DateTime( "2013-12-18T23:41:54.959Z" ); –  Basil Bourque Jan 24 at 23:47

Just set proper pattern: "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSZ"

In your case:

public static int minutesFromDateString(final String s){        

        DateTimeFormatter formatter = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSZ").withZone(DateTimeZone.forID("Europe/Berlin"));
        DateTime dt = formatter.parseDateTime(s);

        Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
        calendar.setTime(dt.toDate());

        return calendar.get(Calendar.MINUTE);
    }

Output:

41

See docs HERE

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The answer by PearsonArtPhoto is correct. To add more…

With Joda-Time, no need for format pattern, and no need for Calendar class. You are working too hard.

  • The DateTime class takes an ISO 8601 string directly in its constructor.
  • Call the getMinuteOfHour method on a DateTime to extract just that portion.

If you want UTC/GMT rather than a specific time zone, pass the built-in constant, DateTimeZone.UTC. Be aware that time zone could affect your minute-of-hour. Not all time zones adjust by full hours. India for example has an offset of five and a half hours ahead of UTC/GMT (+05:30).

String input = "2013-12-18T23:41:54.959Z";
DateTimeZone timeZone = DateTimeZone.forID( "Europe/Berlin" ); // DateTimeZone.UTC;
DateTime dateTime = new DateTime( input, timeZone );
int minuteOfHour = dateTime.getMinuteOfHour();

Dump to console…

System.out.println( "dateTime: " + dateTime );
System.out.println( "minuteOfHour: " + minuteOfHour );

When run…

dateTime: 2013-12-19T00:41:54.959+01:00
minuteOfHour: 41
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