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I would like to add the text which is the result from head command to sed. Can I achieve this in a one liner?

This is what I have come up so far.

header=`head -n 1 csv1.csv`
sed -e '1 i\'$'\n''$header' another_csv.csv

What I don't know is how do I pass the result from one command to another command. I tried usnig xargs but no luck. I don't know how to pass that as a variable.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -e '1r file2' -e 'q' file1

or perhaps use:

head -1 file1 | cat - file2
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For the benefit of others who are (like me) at first puzzled by the sed trickery: 1r file2 simply prints file2 (corresponding to another_csv.csv in the OP's approach) to stdout; 'q' file1 reads and prints the first line from file1 (corresponding to csv1.csv, from which to get the header) then quits, effectively printing the 1st line (the header) only; since sed appends file content read via r to the overall output, the header line is printed first. –  mklement0 Dec 22 '13 at 20:53

Unless I am missing something it can be:

head -1 csv1.csv && cat another.csv
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Sorry, but that doesn't save to the file do I have to pipe again? –  toy Dec 22 '13 at 18:36
1  
@toy: You have 2 options if you wanted to redirect the output from both commands to a file: (a) use a subshell: (head -1 csv1.csv && cat another.csv) > outFile or (b) use grouping (technically better, but trickier syntax-wise): { head -1 csv1.csv && cat another.csv; } > outFile –  mklement0 Dec 22 '13 at 19:56

awk:

awk 'NR==1{getline h<"csv1.csv";print h}7 ' another.csv

test:

kent$  head f c
==> f <==
1
2
3
4
5

==> c <==
10
9
8

kent$  awk 'NR==1{getline h<"c";print h}7 ' f
10
1
2
3
4
5

gnu sed

kent$  sed '1s/.*/head -n 1 c;echo &/ge' f 
10
1
2
3
4
5
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@anubhava's solution is simpler, but just to show the corrected version of the OP's approach:

Linux

sed -e "1 i $(head -n 1 csv1.csv)" another_csv.csv
  • On Linux you need not place the text passed to i on a separate line (thus no need for \ and the literal newline ($'\n').
  • In the original approach, '$header' was placed in single quotes, preventing string interpolation - double quotes are needed: "$header" (in my reformulation I used double quotes for the entire sed command (not recommended in general) and directly placed the command inside, using command substitution ($(...)).

OSX

Same as above, except \ and a newline ($'\n') must be inserted right after the i:

sed -e '1 i\'$'\n'"$(head -n 1 csv1.csv)" another_csv.csv

(The equivalent of:

sed -e "1 i\
$(head -n 1 csv1.csv)
" another_csv.csv

)

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