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Is it a bad practice to pattern match against record as tuples in Erlang (or Elixir)?

Sample code: Assume we have defined this module:

defmodule Ween do
  defrecord TimeSpot, at: nil, tag: nil

  def proper?({ _, _, "home"} = v),   do: { true,   "succeeded with:  #{inspect v}"     }
  def proper?(other),                 do: { false,  "failed with:     #{inspect other}" }

  def sample, do: TimeSpot.new(tag: "home")
end

If we define a test as follow:

defmodule WeenTest do
  use ExUnit.Case
  require Ween

  test "records are tuples" do
    case Ween.proper?(Ween.sample) do 
      { true, v }       ->  IO.puts v
                            assert(true)
      { false, v }      ->  IO.puts v
                            assert(false)
    end
  end
end

It will succeed.

Edit 1: @parroty The reason that here pattern matching against tuples tested is to simulate some "sort of" duck typing for records; the ultimate thing I wished for, should look like this:

defmodule Ween do
  defrecord TimeSpot, at: nil, tag: nil

  def proper?([tag: "home"] = v),          do: { true,   "succeeded with:  #{inspect v}"     }
  def proper?([tag: "1234"] = v),          do: { true,   "succeeded with:  #{inspect v}"     }
  def proper?(other),                      do: { false,  "failed with:     #{inspect other}" }

  def sample, do: TimeSpot.new(tag: "home")
end

So every record with a 'tag' field baring a "home" value would match the first clause. Of-course it seems there would be some performance penalties there.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Cesarini and Thompson say in their book Erlang Programming to never rely on the fact that records are implemented as tuples, since that implementation could change. See the accepted answer to this question.

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3  
One other reason is that you may want to change the record definition (for example add a new field) in this case the direct pattern matching will need to be modified while Parroty solution is still good. IMHO this is the reason to use records rather than tuples, so it it is why it is important to not use direct pattern matching with records. –  Pascal Dec 23 '13 at 7:52
    
Actually they being over-cautious, records are defined to be tuples where the first element is the record name and then follow th record fields in the same order as in the record definition. However, it is deemed to be bad style to mix record syntax and tuple syntax as it removes one of the main benefits of using records. –  rvirding Jan 1 at 12:14

I think the record can be directly used for pattern matching (this would be better than using tuple structure).

defmodule Ween do
  defrecord TimeSpot, at: nil, tag: nil

  def proper?(TimeSpot[tag: "home"] = v),  do: { true,   "succeeded with:  #{inspect v}"     }
  def proper?(other),                      do: { false,  "failed with:     #{inspect other}" }

  def sample, do: TimeSpot.new(tag: "home")
end
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Just for completeness (as this question is still very high on the Elixir tagged questions list): as of Elixir 0.13, records are deprecated (other than for interacting with Erlang code) and the question is now best implemented using Structs. These also conveniently give you the polymorphism that you desire (Structs are a form of Map)

http://elixir-lang.org/getting_started/15.html
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These Maps are the same Map introduced in Erlang R17 or they are different? –  Kaveh Shahbazian Jul 8 at 6:59
    
Sort of. Effectively the chain of thought seems to be that Records encourage adding functions within the record in an OO style (something like what you did), whereas "the elixir/erlang way" is to encourage a functional approach. So, "Dict" is introduced as the Protocol. Then a "Map" is an implementation of the Dict protocol using the E17 Map type. However, this implementation is declared "fast for small number of values, but slow for larger amounts", hence there is also a "HashDict" type which one should use for large amounts of keys... –  The Wildgoose Jul 8 at 8:38
1  
However, a Struct is kind of a minimal implementation of Map which doesn't offer the Dict protocol features, ie for all practical effects its a basic hash type. This seems to be what is needed for the backbone of a "class type" (not the right words, but hope you see what I mean). The latest evolution (Elixir 0.14 I think) is that we can have Implementations that you can kind of include. The upshot is that you can start with your basic "Struct" and include the Enumerable bits if you want that functionality... Cool –  The Wildgoose Jul 8 at 8:39

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