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I am making a colour-picker using pure JavaScript and HTML. It consists of three HTML selects (drop downs boxes) and one div the background-colour of which will be changed by JavaScript. I am also trying to do this as "correctly" as possible. This means no Javascript code in the HTML.

My code so far looks like this:

    var red = document.getElementById('red');
    red.onchange = update();

    var green = document.getElementById('green');
    green.onchange = update();

    var blue = document.getElementById('blue');
    blue.onchange = update();

    var thebox = document.getElementById('colourbox');

    function d2h(d) {return d.toString(16);}
    function h2d(h) {return parseInt(h,16);} 

    function update(){
        finalcolor = '#' + d2h(red.value) + d2h(green.value) + d2h(blue.value)
        thebox.style.background = finalcolour;
    }

And the HTML looks like this:

<div id="colourbox"></div>
<form name="myform" action="colour.html">
    <select name="red" id="red">
        <option value="0">0</option>
        .... etc etc ....
    </select>
    <select name="green" id="red">
        <option value="0">0</option>
        .... etc etc ....
    </select>
    <select name="blue" id="red">
        <option value="0">0</option>
        .... etc etc ....
    </select>
</form>

The trouble is that all the document.getElementById() calls return null. Presumably because they don't exist at the time that the code is run. I have tried putting the code inside an window.onload = function() {} but a) that just gets confusing and b) I would then have to define the update function inside a function, which doesn't seem right.

Can anyone shed some light on this? Are there any general rules which might help me understand how it works? Or some documentation on the subject?

EDIT: revised code:

<script type="text/javascript">
    window.onload = function(){
        var red = document.getElementById('red');
        red.onchange = update();

        var green = document.getElementById('green');
        green.onchange = update();

        var blue = document.getElementById('blue');
        blue.onchange = update();

        var thebox = document.getElementById('colourbox');

        function d2h(d) {return d.toString(16);}
        function h2d(h) {return parseInt(h,16);} 

        function update(){
            var finalcolor = '#' + d2h(document.getElementById('red').value) + d2h(document.getElementById('green').value) + d2h(document.getElementById('blue').value);

            document.getElementById('colourbox').style.background = finalcolor;
        }

    }
</script>
share|improve this question
    
As far as I can see, your HTML doesn't include your JavaScript code at all (ie not even a script tag). How are you running it? –  danben Jan 15 '10 at 16:59
    
Yeah, I left that line out for brevity's sake. I'm using this line: <script type="text/javascript" src="col.js"></script> –  Mr_Chimp Jan 15 '10 at 17:05
    
Well, I managed to get it working by putting everything inside a window.onload and then using document.getElementById() everytime rather than assigning that to a variable and then using the variable. Looks kind of ugly but it works :s –  Mr_Chimp Jan 15 '10 at 17:07
1  
I know people are going to say this isn't related to the question, but I would do myself a favor and use a JavaScript library for this sort of thing. It's gonna make your life a whole lot easier. –  steve_c Jan 15 '10 at 17:11
1  
Valiant but futile. Go download jQuery. –  Frank Schwieterman Jan 15 '10 at 17:21
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

putting code in a handler for the onload event works just fine, and is widely accepted. So is putting a function within a function (depending on the reason).

var mypage = {
    red: null,
    green: null,
    blue: null,
    colourbox: null,

    d2h: function(d) {
        var hex = d.toString(16);
        if (hex.length < 2) {
            hex = '0' + hex;
        }
        return hex.toUpperCase();
    },

    h2d: function(d) {
        return parseInt(h, 16);
    },

    update: function() {
        mypage.colourbox.style.backgroundColor = '#' + mypage.d2h(mypage.red.value) + mypage.d2h(mypage.green.value) + mypage.d2h(mypage.blue.value);
    }
};

window.onload = function() {
    mypage.red = document.getElementById('red');
    mypage.red.onchange = mypage.update;

    mypage.green = document.getElementById('green');
    mypage.green.onchange = mypage.update;

    mypage.blue = document.getElementById('blue');
    mypage.blue.onchange = mypage.update;

    mypage.colourbox = document.getElementById('colourbox');
}

Here is a blog post by dean edwards about using window.onload

Another option is to put your javascript at the bottom of the page instead of at the top.

share|improve this answer
    
Error: red is not defined (on the line with all the d2h's) Putting the code at the bottom of the page doesn't appear to change anything. –  Mr_Chimp Jan 15 '10 at 17:14
    
@Chimp: I would go with the code I posted. It should work just fine. –  Gabriel McAdams Jan 15 '10 at 17:16
    
Doesn't give any errors when it loads but it says "red is not defined" when you select a value with the dropdown. If you change the "red" to document.getElementById('red') (and the same with the green etc) then it will work. Still needs some work - it's not converting to hex properly. Cheers! –  Mr_Chimp Jan 15 '10 at 17:26
    
@Chimp: It is converting properly. You just have to make sure the length of each hex string is 2 ('09' instead of '9'). Look at my modified code - it works perfectly. –  Gabriel McAdams Jan 15 '10 at 17:50
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As the others said you will need to wrap your code inside a function and call it from the window.onload event..

Also when you assign a function to an event, use the name only (no parenthesis) or the function gets called right there and then ..

so

red.onchange = update();

should be

red.onchange = update;
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