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Problem: I have a pretty big structure with POD variables, and I need to copy around some fields, but not others. Too lazy to write down a member-by-member copy function.

Solution: move the copy-able fields to the base, assign the base. Like this:

struct A
{
   int a, b, c;
};

struct B : public A
{
    int d, e, f;
};

//And copy:

B x, y;
(A&)x = y; //copies the part of B that is A

Now, this is dirty, I know. I had a live, livid discussion with co-workers re: this code, my competence, and my moral character. Yet the hardest specific charge I heard was "d, e, f are not initialized in the copy". Yes I know; that was the intent. Of course I initialize them elsewhere.

Another charge was "unsafe typecast". But this is a guaranteed-safe typecast to the base class! Is's almost like

((A*)&x)->operator=(b);

but less verbose. The derivation is public; so treating B as A is fair game. There's no undefined behavior, as far as I can see.

So, I'm appealing to the collective wizdom of SO. This is an invitation to criticism. Have a go at it, people.

EDIT: the final line of the snippet can be expanded into less offensive code in more than one way. For example:

void Copy(A& to, const A& from)
{
    to = from;
}

B x, y;
Copy(x, y);

Functionally the same. Or like this:

x.A::operator=(y);

EDIT2: there's no maintenance programmer but me. It's from a hobby project. So stop pitying that poor soul.

share|improve this question
    
Please specify a descriptive title for your question. –  Eli Bendersky Jan 15 '10 at 17:03
    
Whoa, memcpy FTW! –  Eduardo León Jan 15 '10 at 17:05
1  
In my opinion, you need to justify your laziness, or your architecture. Doing something like this suggests that your architecture is perhaps not the best. –  Paul Nathan Jan 15 '10 at 17:06
    
I'm assuming you didn't mean to repeat the field c. –  Keith Randall Jan 15 '10 at 17:07
2  
If you're the only maintenance programmer, you should always pity your future self. –  luke Jan 15 '10 at 19:21
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9 Answers 9

It all depends on the context and on which part is supposedly "dirty" here.

Firstly, the "sliced copying" trick is technically legal. Formally, it is not really a "hack". You can also achieve the same result by using the qualified name of the assignment operator to refer to the operator from A

x.A::operator =(y); // same as `(A&) x = y` in your case

It is starting to look familiar, isn't it? Yes, that's exactly what you would do if you had to implement the assignment operator in the derived class, if you suddenly decided to do it manually

B& B::operator =(const B& rhs) 
{
  A::operator =(rhs); // or `this->A::operator =(rhs)`

  // B-specific part goes here
}

The A::operator =(rhs); part is exactly the same "sliced copying" trick as yours above, however in this case it is used in a different context. Nobody would, of course, blame you for the latter use, since that's how it is normally done and how it should be done. So, again, the "dirtiness" of the specific application of the trick depends on the context. It is perfectly fine as an integral part of the implementation of the derived assignment operator, but it might look highly questionable when used "by itself" as in your case.

However, secondly and more importantly, what I would call "dirty" in your case is not the use of the trick with "sliced copying" itself. From what you described in your question, it looks like you actually split your data structure into two classes (A and B) specifically for the purpose of being able to use the aforementioned trick. This is what I would call "dirty" in this case. Not the "sliced copying" trick itself, but rather the use of inheritance for the sole purpose of enabling the "sliced copying". If you did it just to avoid writing the assignment operator manually, that's an instance of blatant laziness. That's what's "dirty" here. I wouldn't recommend using inheritance for such purely utilitarian purposes.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly; had I written x.A::operator =(y); no one would ever object :)) But I wasn't sure it's legit, since the struct does not override the assignment operator. –  Seva Alekseyev Jan 15 '10 at 17:56
    
We would still object! It is only in the implementation of B::operator= that it is allowed. Why don't you simply do x = y anyway, the default generated version of B::operator= is made for those! –  Matthieu M. Jan 15 '10 at 19:19
    
'Cause I don't want d, e, f to be copied. –  Seva Alekseyev Jan 15 '10 at 19:21
    
To me the main difference of using the A::operator= within the B::operator= as compared to using it in outside code is that B has control over all its invariants. Consider that B could have data is dependent on A subobject, if B::operator= uses A::operator= as a step is a detail of implementation: it can still provide the same invariants in a later step (within the same operation). Doing it from outside will not allow the B part of the object to know that the A part has changed, possibly breaking invariants. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 18 '10 at 8:39
    
... consider a vehicle that contains a wheels field, and is extended by truck that has a vector of wheels elements conaining the nominal_tyre_pressure. If external code changes the vehicle subobject without the truck subobject knowledge, it will be unable to resize the nominal_tyre_pressure vector breaking an invariant and possibly leading to UB (access elements beyond the end of the vector) since truck code will assume the appropriate size. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 18 '10 at 8:43
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Yes; this is dirty - you're intentionally slicing because you're too lazy to write B::CopyVariablesThatIWant(const B&). You're abusing the type system in a way that works for you, however you will most likely confuse and/or enrage any future programmers who have to look at your code and figure out it's intent.

Your coworkers are right, you should be ashamed of yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Please explicate which part of the type system I'm abusing. The autogeneration of struct copy code? The public inheritance? The cast to the base? For the record, it's not work code, it's from a hobby project that no one will maintain but me. –  Seva Alekseyev Jan 15 '10 at 17:15
1  
@Seva: There are certain bodily functions that, however natural and desirable, I'd prefer you didn't do in public. Code like this is in the same category. If you're absolutely sure that the only person who will ever see this is you, then just don't tell me about it. –  David Thornley Jan 15 '10 at 18:51
    
Around 20% of responders here don't consider this a bodily function. And the title actually says "dirty hack"; you've been warned :) –  Seva Alekseyev Jan 15 '10 at 20:43
    
The part of the type system you're abusing is the usage of inheritance for reasons other than what is considered the proper reason for inheritance. When people see inheritance, they assume it was done for a number of common reasons - this isn't one of them. They also assume there is a specific type of conceptual relationship between the base and derived class - there isn't here. As I said, this is just a roundabout way of declaring and implementing B::CopyVariablesThatIWant(const B&). You should just do that. –  Terry Mahaffey Jan 15 '10 at 22:29
    
Well, so is overloading << for the purposes of stream I/O. I'm in a good company. :) –  Seva Alekseyev Jan 22 '10 at 14:44
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Why not just do a member struct and do things explicitly:

struct A
{
    int a, b, c;
};

struct B
{
    A top_;
    int d, e, f;
};

//And copy:

B x, y;
x.top_ = y.top_;

And in my opinion the dirtiest part is unnecessary obfuscation of the code. Six month from now some poor soul will curse you trying to understand why in Batman's name it's done this way.

share|improve this answer
1  
'Cause then every time I want to access a member of A given a reference to B, I have to type "_top.". And the code will be much heavier and harder to read. There's much more field access than copying in the program, so complicating field access to simplify copying is a bad idea. –  Seva Alekseyev Jan 15 '10 at 18:06
    
Well, write a[n inline] function to do that then. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Jan 15 '10 at 18:10
    
Thanks for the edit @atk –  Nikolai N Fetissov Jan 15 '10 at 18:44
1  
Seva, the decision might be more properly phrased as "which is true, A is-a B, or A has-a B." If it's the first then Nikolai's solution is incorrect; if it's the second then Nikolai's solution sounds more correct from a design standpoint. Either way, deciding whether to use inheritance or composition based on how much typing you have to do is unsavory. :) –  Curt Nichols Jan 15 '10 at 19:30
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Problem: I have a pretty big structure with POD variables, and I need to copy around some fields, but not others. Too lazy to write down a member-by-member copy function.

Then don't. (But then assignment will assign everything.)

Also, if you want slicing, you could do:

B b;
A a;
a = b;

Just having uninitialized members seems dirty indeed.

share|improve this answer
    
"Assign everything" is what I'm trying to avoid in the first place. And both source and target of copying are instances of B. –  Seva Alekseyev Jan 15 '10 at 17:10
    
The target of the COPY is an A - you told it so! –  Alex Brown Jan 15 '10 at 17:20
    
And why exactly does the target have to be B? - Well, perhaps it isn't that bad, if in the same function you are going to set the uninitialized fields in some other ways (e.g computed values). –  UncleBens Jan 15 '10 at 17:22
    
+1 If you want only the fields of A, then use a A. –  Matthieu M. Jan 15 '10 at 19:23
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What are the semantics that make some fields needed for the copy but not others?

The semantics of operator=() are that afterwards the two objects will be have equivalent observable state. (That is, after a = b;, a == b should return true.) Why you would want to violate those semantics and confuse your maintenance programmers is the real question. What possible long-term benefit do you see to not explicitly writing your MinimalClone() function, versus the long-term harm to ease of understanding your code?

Edit: There's always a maintenance programmer, unless you delete the code just after compilation. I can't count the number of times I've returned to something I wrote months prior and said "what was I thinking?!?" Be kind to your maintenance programmer, even if it's you.

share|improve this answer
    
There's no maintenance programmer; see around. –  Seva Alekseyev Jan 15 '10 at 17:49
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The problem is that you are initialising a B using an A constructor. I'm surprised compilers allow this.

This means when you go to access the B, and use functions which expect it to have initialised c,d,e, it will not work as expected and may crash. Also if it's actually a class and has virtual functions, it will have a different vtable from that expected by the compiler.

Watch this:

#include <stdio.h>

void f(A& y)
{
  B x;
  x.d = 5;
  printf("%i\n",x.d);
}

void g(A& y)
{
  B x;
  (A&)x = y;                                                  
  printf("%i\n",x.d);                                         
}                                                             

main()                                                        
{                                                             
  B z;                                                        
  z.d = 3;                                                    
  f(z);                                                       
  g(z);                                                       
} 

and compile and run

g++ 1.cc
./a.out
5
5

explain that, please?

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm assigning, not initializing. And it does work as expected. :) Here's the train of thought: a reference to B can be safely cast to a reference to A. If you have two references to A, you can copy between them. The compiler-generated copy code for A does not care whether this A is actually a B. –  Seva Alekseyev Jan 15 '10 at 17:08
1  
updated with example of undesireable behaviour. –  Alex Brown Jan 15 '10 at 17:21
    
Good one. Looks as if the copy operator is somehow virtual... –  Seva Alekseyev Jan 15 '10 at 17:34
    
no, it's a problem with uninitialised data on the stack. –  Alex Brown Jan 15 '10 at 17:38
    
I take that back. It's an artifact of stack layout in GCC. You're printf'ing the value of d, which is not initialized by design. –  Seva Alekseyev Jan 15 '10 at 17:47
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You could get in trouble in the following situation:

struct A {
  char a;
  int b;
};

struct B : public A {
  char c;
};

a is allocated at offset 0 and b is allocated at offset 4 in the structure (padding to align b). c can be allocated at offset 1 because that space is not being used by A. If that happens, your assignment may clobber c (if A's copy constructor copies the unused padding, which it is allowed to do).

I'm not sure whether allocating c in A's padding space is allowed in C++. I wrote a Java compiler that does it, though, so it isn't unprecedented.

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2  
Data members are required to be in order in C++, base class first, so this can't happen. –  David Thornley Jan 15 '10 at 17:18
    
@Keith: No, that is not possible. The "sliced" copying is not allowed to clobber B::c. Once again, there's nothing "hackish" about what the OP does and the behavior is perfectly defined by the language. It is just that the specific use of that copying mentioned in the OP doesn't look too elegant, to say the least. –  AndreyT Jan 15 '10 at 17:54
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How about:

struct A
{
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
};
struct B: public A
{
    int d;
    int e;
    int f;
};

int main()
{
    B   x;
    B   y;
    static_cast<A&>(x)  = y;

}
share|improve this answer
1  
I think i'm missing something. Isn't that what he does? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 15 '10 at 19:11
    
It is, though using C-cast. I don't think that the dirty refer to the type of casting used though ;) –  Matthieu M. Jan 15 '10 at 19:20
    
No difference. It just looks neater in C++ syntax rather than C (No C cast or pointers) –  Loki Astari Jan 15 '10 at 22:10
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The big issue I have against this is that it saves you only a little bit of work, and leaves a big "Huh?" for the next guy to come around. Commenting it is no better, as it still leaves something extra to be comprehended and is more typing than just doing it right would be.

After decades of poring over assorted code, I've come to really resent anything that gets in the way of just reading and understanding.

share|improve this answer
    
After decades of poring over code, you can't just read and understand a single assignment statement? :) Or you're thinking of some hypothetical "maintenance programmer"? Or you're making a general statement to the effect of "don't try to be smart, kid"? –  Seva Alekseyev Jan 15 '10 at 19:55
    
Oh, I can understand it all right. However, since it's screwy, I have to make a small mental effort to figure out what it's doing and why. Individually, it's no big deal (except for the impression it gives me of the original coder). Start putting more of those in the code and reading it gets slower and more arduous. Generally, it's harder to understand code than it was to write it in the first place. If you're as clever and cutsie as you can be when writing it, comprehending it is going to be a real annoyance. –  David Thornley Jan 15 '10 at 20:53
    
Which brings me back to the original question: what exactly is screwy here? You never answered to that. Do you think it's screwy 'cause I just told you so? Gimme a technical argument. –  Seva Alekseyev Jan 15 '10 at 21:45
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