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I am trying to determine the name of the executing type. I execute this.GetType in my base class and it returns the name of the invoking class (e.g. class that inherited from my base class). How do I get the name of the class where this.GetType() is actually executing?

Consider the following code.

class MyBaseClass() : SomeEvenHigherClass {
    public MyBaseClass() {
        Debug.WriteLine(this.GetType().Name);
    }
}

class ChildClass: MyBaseClass {

}

void Main() {
    var cc = new ChildClass();
}

In the constructor of the MyBaseClass, I would like to print out the name of the actual class that I am in.

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1  
Why can't you just print MyBaseClass..? The actual instance you create is ChildClass so this will refer to that class. Your object has no knowledge of the variable it is assigned to. –  Jeroen Vannevel Dec 22 '13 at 21:09
    
@JeroenVannevel This was a contrived example. There are a bunch of classes that can be inherited from. –  AngryHacker Dec 22 '13 at 21:34
1  
@AngryHacker If you're worried about strongly typing then perhaps changing it to typeof(MyBaseClass).Name would be the way to go. That way, when you rename your base class via the rename option in Visual Studio, you would always be printing out the proper name. –  Silvermind Dec 22 '13 at 21:54
1  
Why are you trying to do this? What is your goal? –  Aaron Palmer Dec 22 '13 at 22:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you just want to keep it strongly typed in case the name changes, then instead of just printing it out hardcoded you can do this:

// When using the rename tool for 'MyBaseClass' in Visual Studio,
// it will still be printing out the right value.
Debug.WriteLine(typeof(MyBaseClass).Name);

Another workaround might be:

public MyBaseClass()
{
    var m = System.Reflection.MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod();
    Console.WriteLine(m.DeclaringType.Name);
}

If you only care for the current base type then you could go with Aaron Palmer's answer, however the result is perhaps not what you want in the following case:

public class MyBaseClass
{
    public MyBaseClass()
    {
        var type = this.GetType();
        Debug.WriteLine(type.BaseType.Name);
        // If this was called by ChildClass it would print MyBaseClass2
    }
}

public class MyBaseClass2 : MyBaseClass
{
}

public class ChildClass : MyBaseClass2
{
}
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MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().DeclaringType did the trick. Thank you kindly. –  AngryHacker Dec 22 '13 at 22:14

try this:

Debug.WriteLine(this.GetType().BaseType.Name);
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I think he wants the class type where he is in. This would only give you the base type where it currently inherits from. –  Silvermind Dec 22 '13 at 21:45
    
Ah, I misunderstood the question. –  Aaron Palmer Dec 22 '13 at 21:47
    
Actually, in this particular instance, BaseType does return the correct value (MyBaseClass). Based on the MS documentation, there may need to be an additional test in case the type is generic. –  competent_tech Dec 22 '13 at 21:53
    
@competent_tech Yes, but it won't if there is an inheritance in between, like say he wants to do the same in SomeEvenHigherClass. –  Silvermind Dec 22 '13 at 21:56

Use

Debug.WriteLine(typeof(MyBaseClass).Name);

That will statically get you the name of MyBaseClass. And it is even type safe, so when you later rename your class (using some automatic refactoring), it will return the new name of the class.

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