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I'm trying to turn a single UIView within a UIViewController, without turning the entire controller. Is this possible? I'll try to illustrate:

_____^_____       ____________________
|         |      |      ____^____     |
|  __^__  |      |     |         |    |
|  |   |  |      |  A  |    B    |    > 
|  | B |  |  --> |     |_________|    |
|  |___|  |      |                    |
|         |      |____________________|
|    A    |
|_________|

The views' orientation is shown with arrow pointing UP for each view. The UIViewController(A) is always to stay in portrait, so that if the device is turned into landscape, up would be to the side. The UIView will turn to obey the device's orientation, so that up will be up. This, or something similar can be seen in the YouTube-app, if you click a video in portrait, it shows in the top of the view, and if you turn the device, only the video-view plays in landscape. Have they solved it differently? Can a single UIView have its own rules for shouldAutorotateToInterfaceOrientation, shouldAutorotate, supportedInterfaceOrientations and/or preferredInterfaceOrientationForPresentation, other than its controller?

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Did you try my solution? –  Leo Natan Dec 25 '13 at 21:25

1 Answer 1

You need to apply a transform to the view yourself. You should apply this transform in viewDidLayoutSubviews to make sure the transform is applied correctly when the view is layout, and also register for UIDeviceOrientationDidChangeNotification notifications and reapply the transform when the device orientation changes.

-(void)_applyTransform
{
    CGAffineTransform t = CGAffineTransformIdentity;
    if ([[UIDevice currentDevice] orientation] == UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeLeft)
    {
        t = CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(M_PI/2.0);
    }
    else if ([[UIDevice currentDevice] orientation] == UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeRight)
    {
        t = CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(-M_PI/2.0);
    }
    else if ([[UIDevice currentDevice] orientation] == UIDeviceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown)
    {
        t = CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(M_PI);
    }

    [_view setTransform:t];
}

- (void)_deviceOrientationDidChange:(NSNotification*)n
{
    [self _applyTransform];
}

- (void)viewDidLayoutSubviews
{
    [super viewDidLayoutSubviews];

    [self _applyTransform];
}

Added by a fan of the answer! :) Just for the record, here's a full set of typical working code using Leo's awesome example.

Say you have a UIView class, so, typically matching a XIB you are loading. In the example the view has four buttons. We will spin the buttons when the iPhone spins. (To be clear we're just spinning, what we want to, in the view - we're not spinning the whole view in this example. You could spin things, move items, hide things, or whatever you want, or indeed you could spin the whole view if relevant. Dealing with the broader issues of resizing is different, this example shows "just" spinning the damned buttons in place.)

(BTW, normally I'd suggest using probably categories here, but this is a good example to show how it works, as straightforward paste-in code.)

Note that it animates the button spinning around.

@implementation SomeUIView

-(id)initWithCoder:(NSCoder*)coder
    {
    self = [super initWithCoder:coder];
    if (!self) return nil;

    // your other setup code

    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter]
        addObserver:self selector:@selector(spun)
        name:UIDeviceOrientationDidChangeNotification object:nil];

    NSLog(@"added ok...");
    return self;
    }

-(void)dealloc
    {
    NSLog(@"removed ok...");

    // your other dealloc code

    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter]
        removeObserver:self
        name:UIDeviceOrientationDidChangeNotification object:nil];
    }

and then to spin the buttons (or whatever you want)...

-(void)spinOneThing:(UIView *)vv
    {
    CGAffineTransform t = CGAffineTransformIdentity;

    if ([[UIDevice currentDevice] orientation] ==
             UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeLeft)
        t = CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(M_PI/2.0);
    if ([[UIDevice currentDevice] orientation] ==
             UIDeviceOrientationLandscapeRight)
        t = CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(-M_PI/2.0);
    if ([[UIDevice currentDevice] orientation] ==
             UIDeviceOrientationPortraitUpsideDown)
        t = CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(M_PI);

    [UIView animateWithDuration:0.1 animations:^{ [vv setTransform:t]; }];
    }

-(void)spun  // the device was spun by the user
    {
    NSLog(@"spun...");
    [self spinOneThing:self.buttonA];
    [self spinOneThing:self.buttonB];
    [self spinOneThing:self.buttonC];
    [self spinOneThing:self.buttonD];
    }
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