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We assume that there are 200 bytes of memory in our processor.

Here's the code:

#include <stdlib.h>

char * p;
char data;
void test1()
{
    p = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * 300);
    p[0] = 1;
}

void test2()
{
    p = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * 300);
    data = p[5];
}

When I run the "test1()", obviously there will be a memory overflow. However "test2()" will not. Does the compiler optimized the memory in "test2()" ? How?

And there's another strange problem:

void test3()
{
    char ele[1000]={0};     
}

void test4()
{
   char ele[1000];
   ele[999] = 10;
}

The "test3()" will cause memory overflow, and "test4()" will not.

Sorry for my bad English,and thank you for your answer.

======================================================

Finally,I figure that out. I checked the assembly code, in “test3” it allocated memory indeed.But in "test4" ,the compiler optimized the array, does not allocated memory for it.

Thanks @Philipp,Thanks all.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Ed S., Nishith Jain M R, DavidO, Jonathan Leffler, Romoku Feb 28 '14 at 15:10

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Doesn the compiler "optimize" what exactly? There is no "memory overflow" in any of your examples. I don't think you understand what any of your code is doing. –  Ed S. Dec 23 '13 at 5:07
    
I believe you need to study some operation system concept first. –  moeCake Dec 23 '13 at 5:11
    
Virtual memory is the answer –  Smac89 Dec 23 '13 at 5:11
    
@EdS. assuming the first sentence is true in the question, I think he means allocation failure leading to UB. I do, however, concur with the latter assessment. –  WhozCraig Dec 23 '13 at 5:11
    
Actually my ARM-board is stop running ,when I run "test1()" or "test(3)", and there's no operation system in the processor. –  John G Dec 23 '13 at 5:16

2 Answers 2

When malloc fails because it can't allocate enough memory, it won't crash. It will return the memory address 0 instead.

When you neglect checking the return-value and treat that value as an array, you can still read from it. The reason is that the operator [5] means basically as much as "start from that address, move 5 steps ahead in memory, and read from there". So when p is 0, and you do data = p[5];, you read whatever is at memory address 5. This isn't the memory you allocated - it's whatever is in memory at that location.

But when you try to write something to p[0], you are trying to write to memory address 0 which is not allowed and will lead to a runtime error.

Bottom-line: Whenever you do malloc, check the return value. When it's 0, the memory allocation has failed and you have to deal with that.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks,and what happened in "test4",it should be crashed too. –  John G Dec 23 '13 at 5:18
    
Not clear to me what this has to do with OP's questions, considering that he is asking about "overflow" and none exists in any of his code. –  Andrey Dec 23 '13 at 6:40
    
Not only English matter, he should describe test envirment, code, input, output, what's in his mind, and what's his question thoroughly, not letting people guessing. –  moeCake Dec 23 '13 at 6:51
    
@moeCake Sorry ,I tested on my MCU board,it has 512K flash,and 64K SRAM, I allocated 0x400 bytes for stack size, 0x200 bytes for heap size. "test3" will cause the stack overflow,because when I allocated more stack size like 0x1000 for "test3", there is no running problem for my MCU,it works well.However, the "test4" is works well when stack size is still 0x400.Thanks for your patience. –  John G Dec 23 '13 at 7:40
    
test3 do assign every element in array to 0; while test4 only assign 1 elemnt, even it's the last one, there is no guarantee how virtual memory is mapped. –  moeCake Dec 23 '13 at 8:45

When you request a memory allocation which is greater than available memory, malloc() simply returns NULL. For checking this just add error checking to your code like,

#include <stdlib.h>
char * p;
char data;
void test1()
{
    p = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * 300);
    if(p == NULL)
    {
        printf("Failed to allocate memory\n");
        return -1;
    }
    p[0] = 1;
}

void test2()
{
    p = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * 300);
    if(p == NULL)
    {
        printf("Failed to allocate memory\n");
        return -1;
    }
    p[0] = 1;
    data = p[5];
}

The above calls simply returns error in your case.

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