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I am trying to serialize a class several of the data-members are Nullable objects, here is a example

[XmlAttribute("AccountExpirationDate")]
public Nullable<DateTime> AccountExpirationDate 
{ 
  get { return userPrincipal.AccountExpirationDate; } 
  set { userPrincipal.AccountExpirationDate = value; } 
}

However at runtime I get the error

Cannot serialize member 'AccountExpirationDate' of type System.Nullable`1[System.DateTime]. XmlAttribute/XmlText cannot be used to encode complex types.

However I checked and Nullable is a SerializableAttribute. What am I doing wrong?

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Total guess, but have you tried DateTime? instead of Nullable<DateTime> ? –  Tad Donaghe Jan 15 '10 at 19:34
1  
@Terry - they are identical! –  David M Jan 15 '10 at 19:35
    
@Terry, I can not as DateTime is not nullable and userPrincipal.AccountExpirationDate; can return a null –  Scott Chamberlain Jan 15 '10 at 19:41
2  
He was suggesting the shortcut notation DateTime?, which is synonymous with Nullable<DateTime>... –  David M Jan 15 '10 at 19:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 25 down vote accepted

You can only serialize it as an XmlElement, not as an XmlAttribute, as the representation is too complex for an attribute. That's what the exception is telling you.

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1  
You can create your own implementation of Nullable<T> however and implement the necessary XML serialization attributes for it. –  Nick Larsen Jan 15 '10 at 19:37
    
Yes, you could, agreed. But the compiler wouldn't treat it in exactly the same way as the built-in Nullabele<T>, which has special treatment (thinking of things like implicit definition of ==). So not recommended. –  David M Jan 15 '10 at 19:39
    
@NickLarsen - it also won't be able to correctly generate the schema unless you go mad with it. –  Marc Gravell Jan 15 '10 at 20:47

If you just want it to work, then perhaps:

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Xml.Serialization;
public class Account
{
    // your main property; TODO: your version
    [XmlIgnore]
    public Nullable<DateTime> AccountExpirationDate {get;set;}

    // this is a shim property that we use to provide the serialization
    [XmlAttribute("AccountExpirationDate")]
    [Browsable(false), EditorBrowsable(EditorBrowsableState.Never)]
    public DateTime AccountExpirationDateSerialized
    {
        get {return AccountExpirationDate.Value;}
        set {AccountExpirationDate = value;}
    }

    // and here we turn serialization of the value on/off per the value
    [Browsable(false), EditorBrowsable(EditorBrowsableState.Never)]
    public bool ShouldSerializeAccountExpirationDateSerialized()
    {
        return AccountExpirationDate.HasValue;
    }

    // test it...
    static void Main()
    {
        var ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Account));
        var obj1 = new Account { AccountExpirationDate = DateTime.Today };
        ser.Serialize(Console.Out, obj1);
        Console.WriteLine();
        var obj2 = new Account { AccountExpirationDate = null};
        ser.Serialize(Console.Out, obj2);
    }
}

This will only include the attribute when there is a non-null value.

share|improve this answer
    
Does the XML Serializer check for a ShouldSerializeXxxxxxx method, or is it by catching the exception thrown by AccountExpirationDate.Value that it does not serialize? How does this work? –  Scott Chamberlain Feb 24 '14 at 14:43
1  
@Scott yes, ShouldSerialize* is a pattern used by multiple parts of the framework and multiple serialization libraries –  Marc Gravell Feb 24 '14 at 18:33

I've used something like this many times.

[XmlIgnore]
public Nullable<DateTime> AccountExpirationDate 
{ 
    get { return userPrincipal.AccountExpirationDate; } 
    set { userPrincipal.AccountExpirationDate = value; } 
}

///
/// <summary>Used for Xml Serialization</summary>
///
[XmlAttribute("AccountExpirationDate")]
public string AccountExpirationDateString
{
    get
    {
        return AccountExpirationDate.HasValue
            ? AccountExpirationDate.Value.ToString("yyyy/MM/dd HH:mm:ss.fff")
            : string.Empty;
    }
    set
    {
        AccountExpirationDate =
            !string.IsNullOrEmpty(value)
            ? DateTime.ParseExact(value, "yyyy/MM/dd HH:mm:ss.fff")
            : null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think that should be: AccountExpirationDate.Value.ToString("yyyy/MM/dd HH:mm:ss.fff") –  Perhentian Feb 9 '10 at 9:41
    
Good catch. I've fixed it. –  fre0n Feb 9 '10 at 16:07

Define a Serializable that encapsulates your funcionality.

Here's are and example.

[XmlAttribute("AccountExpirationDate")]  
public SerDateTime AccountExpirationDate   
{   
  get { return _SerDateTime ; }   
  set { _SerDateTime = value; }   
}  


/// <summary>
/// Serialize DateTime Class (<i>yyyy-mm-dd</i>)
/// </summary>
public class SerDateTime : IXmlSerializable {
    /// <summary>
    /// Default Constructor when time is not avalaible
    /// </summary>
    public SerDateTime() { }
    /// <summary>
    /// Default Constructor when time is avalaible
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="pDateTime"></param>
    public SerDateTime(DateTime pDateTime) {
        DateTimeValue = pDateTime;
    }

    private DateTime? _DateTimeValue;
    /// <summary>
    /// Value
    /// </summary>
    public DateTime? DateTimeValue {
        get { return _DateTimeValue; }
        set { _DateTimeValue = value; }
    }

    // Xml Serialization Infrastructure
    void IXmlSerializable.WriteXml(XmlWriter writer) {
        if (DateTimeValue == null) {
            writer.WriteString(String.Empty);
        } else {
            writer.WriteString(DateTimeValue.Value.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd"));
            //writer.WriteString(SerializeObject.SerializeInternal(DateTimeValue.Value));
        }
    }

    void IXmlSerializable.ReadXml(XmlReader reader) {
        reader.ReadStartElement();
        String ltValue = reader.ReadString();
        reader.ReadEndElement();
        if (ltValue.Length == 0) {
            DateTimeValue = null;
        } else {                
            //Solo se admite yyyyMMdd
            //DateTimeValue = (DateTime)SerializeObject.Deserialize(typeof(DateTime), ltValue);
            DateTimeValue = new DateTime(Int32.Parse(ltValue.Substring(0, 4)),
                                Int32.Parse(ltValue.Substring(5, 2)),
                                Int32.Parse(ltValue.Substring(8, 2)));                                    
        }
    }

    XmlSchema IXmlSerializable.GetSchema() {
        return (null);
    }
}
#endregion
share|improve this answer

I was stuck into the similar problem. I had a datetime property (as XmlAttribute) in a class which was exposed in the WCF service.

Below is what I faced and the solution that worked for me : 1) XmlSerializer class was not serialising XmlAttribute of nullable type

[XmlAttribute]
public DateTime? lastUpdatedDate { get; set; }
Exception thrown : Cannot serialize member 'XXX' of type System.Nullable`1. 

2) Some posts suggest to replace [XmlAttribute] with [XmlElement(IsNullable =true)]. But this will serialize the Attribute as an Element which is totally useless. However it works fine for XmlElements

3) Some suggest to implement IXmlSerializable interface into your class, but that doesn't allow WCF service to be called from WCF consuming application. So this too does not work in this case.

Solution :

Don't mark property as nullable, instead use a ShouldSerializeXXX() method to put your constraint.

[XmlAttribute]
public DateTime lastUpdatedDate { get; set; }
public bool ShouldSerializelastUpdatedDate ()
{
   return this.lastUpdatedDate != DateTime.MinValue; 
   // This prevents serializing the field when it has value 1/1/0001       12:00:00 AM
}
share|improve this answer
    
I notice you have posted exactly the same answer here, here, and here. In your opinion, is the solution for all three questions exactly the same? –  Wai Ha Lee Apr 29 at 7:34
    
I don't claim it. If not exact, at least its in the context. My intention is to provide a hint to the person who is facing similar issues. –  Pankaj Pawar Apr 29 at 10:23

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