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I may be doing it wrong but take a peek. If I hardcode the logic, it works but not if I try to use it as a variable.

if($range <= 50) {
    $operator = "<=";
} else {
    $operator = ">=";
}

foreach($cursor as $s) {
    $data = round($this->distance($zip_lat, $zip_lon, $s["lat"],$s["lon"]), 2);

    if ($data .$operator. $range) {
        $zipcodes[] = "$s[zipcode]";   
    }
}               

I mean, I could add the if/else inside the foreach but wasn't sure if it adds any "overhead."

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2  
Shouldn't it be operator = ">" for the else part? –  Brian Rasmussen Jan 15 '10 at 19:48
2  
Others have already solved your problem, but not exactly explained the problem. The reason your code doesn't work is that $data . $operator . $range evaluates to a string, not a boolean expression like you're using it, and a non-empty, non-zero string always evaluates to true. –  Jordan Jan 15 '10 at 19:53
    
lol @ title: I think most languages will surely have ensured that the 'if' statement functions properly ;-) –  ChristopheD Jan 15 '10 at 19:56

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

try:

if ($range <= 50 ? $data <= $range : $data >= $range) {

}

or use an eval()

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perfect, that seems to work. So lets say I added the additional "if/else" from the beginning of my code into the foreach loop, would that add "overhead?" –  luckytaxi Jan 15 '10 at 19:50
1  
@luckytaxi, don't worry about the overhead of an additional IF in PHP, the whole thing is bloat anyway and wont make 0.00001% difference to your running time! –  Aiden Bell Jan 15 '10 at 19:51
    
Why are you so worried about "overhead" ? Is this a known bottleneck (seriously, i think you are optimising prematurely)? –  ChristopheD Jan 15 '10 at 19:52
    
yep you could use an if/else as well, no diff in terms of speed –  jspcal Jan 15 '10 at 19:53
    
Not really. If you read from a file or do a db lookup anywhere in your code, it will take 1000's of times longer than adding the if. Point being don't worry about such a minuscule optimization unless you are running this block in 100,000 iterations. –  Byron Whitlock Jan 15 '10 at 19:53
 if ($data .$operator. $range) 

Is always true, because it is a string ,not a null.

You can find out problem using this simple code:

$data="0";
$operator=">=";
$range="1";

if ($data .$operator. $range) {
       echo   $data .$operator. $range . " is true !";   
}                   
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I disagree with the 'always' part, consider: $data = '0'; $operator = ''; $range = ''; if ($data .$operator. $range){ echo 'this statement is always true'; }; –  ChristopheD Jan 15 '10 at 20:05

The 'dots' only do regular 'string' concatenation - you can't expect them (injected as strings) to behave like regular, 'real' operators.

Think about it: if $data = 'data1' and $range = 50 your if statement becomes:

if ('data1<=50') which will probably just evaluate to true or false, just as if ('yournamehere') or if('randommumbojumbo')

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right, but since in my case both $data and $range are numeric figures, I thought I could throw the "operator" into the mix. –  luckytaxi Jan 15 '10 at 20:01

I very much suspect that the if is simply evaluating the string $date.$operator.$range (which will always return true), as all you're doing is concatenating the operator and operands together.

As such, you may need to eval (duck and cover people, duck and cover) the contents of the if.

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Yes, that is exactly what it does as defined by the concatenation operator. No need to suspect anything ;) +1 for duck and cover –  phant0m Nov 25 '12 at 14:42

You appear to be missing a closing }

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hah, yea just caught that. thanks. i do have it in my code though. –  luckytaxi Jan 15 '10 at 19:55

I think you are going to need to do this:

foreach ( $cursor as $s ) {
    $data = round($this->distance($zip_lat, $zip_lon, $s["lat"],$s["lon"]), 2);
    if ( $range <= 50 ) {
      if ( $data <= $range ) {
          $zipcodes[] = "$s[zipcode]";   
      }
    } else {
      if ( $data >= $range ) {
          $zipcodes[] = "$s[zipcode]";   
      }
    }
}   
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You cannot have a variable representing an evaluation operator. You would have to switch your code to something like:

foreach ($cursor as $s) {
    $data = round($this->distance($zip_lat, $zip_lon, $s["lat"],$s["lon"]), 2);
    if ($range <= 50 && $data <= $range) {
        $zipcodes[] = $s['zipcode'];
    } else if ($data >= $range) {
        $zipcodes[] = $s['zipcode'];
    }
}
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