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I have the following string

String str = " Hello There \n How are you "

I'm trying to print it using System.out.println(str); and System.out.print(str); but all what I'm getting is Hello There

How can I print it all ?

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closed as off-topic by sᴜʀᴇsʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ, Ruchira Gayan Ranaweera, devnull, skuntsel, Kjartan Dec 23 '13 at 13:06

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions concerning problems with code you've written must describe the specific problem — and include valid code to reproduce it — in the question itself. See SSCCE.org for guidance." – devnull, skuntsel, Kjartan
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
That should work. How are you running your program? – Keppil Dec 23 '13 at 12:18
    
@Keppil Using eclipse since I'm programming an Android application – Lily Dec 23 '13 at 12:19
    
It doesn't matter your IDE. Your code is right. – Sergi Dec 23 '13 at 12:19
    
@Sergi Then why I'm only getting half of the sentence ? – Lily Dec 23 '13 at 12:20
1  
Working proof :ideone.com/tDcigS – sᴜʀᴇsʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ Dec 23 '13 at 12:21

Avoid \n and other platform dependent values:

final String NEW_LINE = System.getProperty("line.separator");
String str = String.format("Hello There %s How are you", NEW_LINE);
System.out.println(str);
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    String str = " Hello There \n How are you ";
    System.out.println(str);

As you tried, it is working fine. seems to be you are not read your out put well. Check this out.

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To output a newline on Windows, you should use \r\n, which puts the cursor at the start of the new line. On Linux, you should use \n, which automatically does the job. System.out.println() automatically chooses the appropriate one and prints a new line at the end of the string. So your (platform independent) code should be:

System.out.println("Hello There");
System.out.println("How are you");
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