Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ive made a small Rock paper scissor game with javascript. There are two things that I would like to do to make the game a little better.

1) If the player gives an answer other than rock, paper or scissors for a prompt saying "Please pick between one of the three options: rock, paper or scissors"

I have implemented something like this but it only goes one run. I would like to have the prompt come up until one of the three answers is given

2) I would like to have the game start running code from the top again if it is a tie. How could I get the program to start from the top again?

Here is the code

var userChoice = prompt("Do you choose rock, paper or scissors?");
if (userChoice === "rock")
{}
else if (userChoice === "paper"){}
else if (userChoice === "scissors"){}
else {
    userChoice = prompt ("Please pick between one of the three options: rock, paper or scissors");

}
var computerChoice = Math.random();
if (computerChoice < 0.34) {
    computerChoice = "rock";
} else if(computerChoice <= 0.67) {
    computerChoice = "paper";
} else {
    computerChoice = "scissors";
}
console.log( "The computer's choice is" + " " + computerChoice);
console.log("Your choice was " + userChoice);
var compare = function(choice1 , choice2)
{
    if (choice1 === choice2)
    {
    return "The result is a tie!";

    }


if (choice1 === "rock")
{
    if (choice2 === "scissors")
    {
        return "rock wins";
    }
    else 
    {
        return "paper wins";
    }
}
if (choice1 === "paper")
{
    if (choice2 === "rock")
    {
        return "paper wins";
    }
    else 
    {
        return "scissors wins";
    }
}
if (choice1 === "scissors")
{
    if (choice2 === "rock")
    {
        return "rock wins";
    }
    else
    {
        return "scissors wins";
    }
}
};
compare(userChoice, computerChoice);
share|improve this question

migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Dec 23 '13 at 14:34

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

What you are doing in this program is only 'Conditional statement' checking. There is another construct to Structured Programming that is called 'Loops'

Generally it is humanly possible to copy-paste a segment of code 1000s of times and maybe even millions but not infinite. So for such cases programmers use Loops that start with an initial state, execute the same body of code as long as a given condition holds and follows a state change.

You can use a while loop in this case as it is the simplest structure for such scenarios. It only takes the 'condition' for which it much keep executing the body of code. The structure of while loop is as such.

while ( condition ) {
    <the code that you want it to keep executing>
}

If we break your program down into various parts there are mainly 2 parts to it. 1. Take the input 2. Check if the input is valid or not. If not take the input again. From this you can easily see what should be the condition for your loop.

"While the input is not valid"

So it's like

while ( the input is not valid / the userChoice is not rock or paper or scissors ) {
    take the input
}

To make your loop infinite you can use

while ( true ) {
    take the input
}

To break out of this infinite loop, you use "break;" anywhere inside it. So a 'break;' inside an if statement will get out of this loop like this

while ( true ) {
    if ( condition ) {
        break;
    }
}

So, if we follow your style of condition checks we get.

var userChoice = prompt("Do you choose rock, paper or scissors?");
while ( true ) {
    if (userChoice === "rock")
    {break;}
    else if (userChoice === "paper"){break;}
    else if (userChoice === "scissors"){break;}
    else {
        userChoice = prompt ("Please pick between one of the three options: rock, paper or scissors");
    }
}

But using 'breaks' is a bad programming practice. So why don't we take the advantage of while's 'condition'?

var userChoice = prompt("Do you choose rock, paper or scissors?");
while (userChoice !== "rock" && userChoice !== "paper" && userChoice !== "scissors") {
    userChoice = prompt("Please pick between one of the three options: rock, paper or scissors");
}

And since you want the Game to go on forever, we can put the whole game inside a loop right? But that will totally take your control off your browser and you can't do anything while that loop is waiting for your response. So we keep a way out for ourselves? Why don't we add another condition that, if the user types "EXIT" the game stops?

while ( true ) {
var userChoice = prompt("Do you choose rock, paper or scissors?");

while (userChoice !== "rock" && userChoice !== "paper" && userChoice !== "scissors" && userChoice !== "EXIT") {
    userChoice = prompt("Please pick between one of the three options: rock, paper or scissors");

}
if (userChoice === "EXIT") {
    console.log("Thanks for playing :)");
    break;
}
var computerChoice = Math.random();
if (computerChoice < 0.34) {
    computerChoice = "rock";
} else if(computerChoice <= 0.67) {
    computerChoice = "paper";
} else {
    computerChoice = "scissors";
}
console.log( "The computer's choice is" + " " + computerChoice);
console.log("Your choice was " + userChoice);
var compare = function(choice1 , choice2)
{
    if (choice1 === choice2)
    {
    return "The result is a tie!";

    }
if (choice1 === "rock")
{
    if (choice2 === "scissors")
    {
        return "rock wins";
    }
    else 
    {
        return "paper wins";
    }
}
if (choice1 === "paper")
{
    if (choice2 === "rock")
    {
        return "paper wins";
    }
    else 
    {
        return "scissors wins";
    }
}
if (choice1 === "scissors")
{
    if (choice2 === "rock")
    {
        return "rock wins";
    }
    else
    {
        return "scissors wins";
    }
}
};
compare(userChoice, computerChoice);
}

Now, you can make this much easier to Modify later (for you and others) by breaking your program down into functions just the way you did for the Compare part. Then taking the decision on the userInput will be much more robust process.

function take_user_input() {
    var userChoice = prompt("Do you choose rock, paper or scissors?");
    while (userChoice !== "rock" && userChoice !== "paper" && userChoice !== "scissors" && userChoice !== "EXIT") {
        userChoice = prompt("Please pick between one of the three options: rock, paper or scissors");
    }
    return userChoice;
}


function play(userChoice) {

    var computerChoice = Math.random();
    if (computerChoice < 0.34) {
        computerChoice = "rock";
    } else if(computerChoice <= 0.67) {
        computerChoice = "paper";
    } else {
        computerChoice = "scissors";
    }
    console.log( "The computer's choice is" + " " + computerChoice);
    console.log("Your choice was " + userChoice);
    var compare = function(choice1 , choice2)
    {
        if (choice1 === choice2)
        {
        return "The result is a tie!";

        }
    if (choice1 === "rock")
    {
        if (choice2 === "scissors")
        {
            return "rock wins";
        }
        else 
        {
            return "paper wins";
        }
    }
    if (choice1 === "paper")
    {
        if (choice2 === "rock")
        {
            return "paper wins";
        }
        else 
        {
            return "scissors wins";
        }
    }
    if (choice1 === "scissors")
    {
        if (choice2 === "rock")
        {
            return "rock wins";
        }
        else
        {
            return "scissors wins";
        }
    }
    };
    compare(userChoice, computerChoice);
}

while ( true ) {
    var userChoice = take_user_input();

    if (userChoice === "EXIT") {
        console.log("Thanks for playing :)");
        break;
    } else {
        play(userChoice);
    }
}

And after that, you can study more on reading DOM elements and modifying them using jQuery / modifying the HTML by Javascript. :) But that brings a totally new topic. But I'd suggest you to look that way. Nobody would love to play Rock Paper Scissors using Console Log when they can do that using Graphical User Interface.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. This answer was extremely helpful –  Nik Brkic Dec 25 '13 at 3:29

You could wrap the game in a function, which you then call at any point. Maybe put the initial prompt in its own function, if its valid, call the game function.

function getUserInput()
{
    // put prompt and validation logic here, then call when its a tie
    // You might try consolidating the validation logic with regular expression:
    // This returns an array of matches if only rock, paper or scissors was entered.
       userChoice.match(/(rock|paper|scissors)/)

    if(userChoice)
    {
         runGameLogic();
    }

}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.