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I have a question about Python.

I have a recursive function:

def func(num, k):

    if k == 0:
        print(num, end = '')
        return

    for item in num:
        if item == '1':
            func('123', k-1)
        elif item == '2':
            func('321', k-1)
        elif item == '3':
            func('1', k-1)

Running this code func('2', 3) prints: 12313211231233211

However, actually I don't want the function to print the result. I'd like to get it returned. So, if I run the program as a = func('2', 3) then the program prints nothing. And now I can use a outside the function and for example print it print(a) which yields 12313211231233211.

How should I change the code that it returns the result and doesn't print it?

Thanks!

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

Here's a way to do it where you don't have to change your function's code at all. Instead, we'll create a function decorator that silently catches all printed output, and saves it for later use.

import sys
from io import StringIO

def returnStdout(fn):
    silent_stdout = StringIO()
    def silentFn(*args, depth=0, **kargs):
        nonlocal silent_stdout

        #only replace stdout if it hasn't been replaced already.
        #this may be important if we decorate a recursive function.
        if sys.stdout != silent_stdout:
            old_stdout = sys.stdout
            sys.stdout = silent_stdout
            fn(*args, **kargs)
            sys.stdout = old_stdout
            result = silent_stdout.getvalue()

            #clear silent_stdout so the next call to the decorated function doesn't contain the values of previous calls
            silent_stdout = StringIO()

            return result
        else:
            fn(*args, **kargs)
    return silentFn

@returnStdout
def func(num, k):

    if k == 0:
        print(num, end = '')
        return

    for item in num:
        if item == '1':
            func('123', k-1)
        elif item == '2':
            func('321', k-1)
        elif item == '3':
            func('1', k-1)


result = func("2", 3)
print("got result. Result is:")
print(result)

Result:

got result. Result is:
12313211231233211
share|improve this answer
def func(num, k, result=None):
    if result is None:
        result = []
    if k == 0:
        result.append(num)
    else:
        for item in num:
            if item == '1':
                func('123', k-1, result)
            elif item == '2':
                func('321', k-1, result)
            elif item == '3':
                func('1', k-1, result)
    return "".join(result)

I added the result parameter but just for holding the solution, you don't need to provide any list to running this version. Just run it like you posted:

print func('2', 3)
share|improve this answer
    
try now I just edited –  Raydel Miranda Dec 23 '13 at 15:09
1  
I tried this and func("2", 3) returns 123. I don't think that's right. –  Kevin Dec 23 '13 at 15:15
    
@Kevin Yes, I got the same answer now 123. But yes, that's not correct. –  user3129888 Dec 23 '13 at 15:18
    
Ok, ok I fixed!!! –  Raydel Miranda Dec 23 '13 at 15:26
    
Don't use an empty list as a default parameter, it won't be "cleared" the next time the function is called. For example, print(func('2', 3)); print(func('2', 3)) gives the wrong answer on the second call. You could use None as the default and test for that at the top of the function. –  Steve Jessop Dec 23 '13 at 15:27

Here is another way to do it.

def func(num, k, m={'1':'123','2':'321','3':'1'}):
    def recurs(s, c, r=''):
        return s if c == 0 else ''.join([recurs(m.get(i,''), c-1) for i in s])
    return recurs(num, k)

>>> func('2', 3)
'12313211231233211'
share|improve this answer

In Python 3.3:

def iter_func(num, k):
    if k == 0:
        yield num
    else:
        for item in num:
            if item == '1':
                yield from iter_func('123', k-1)
            elif item == '2':
                yield from iter_func('321', k-1)
            else:
                yield from iter_func('1', k-1)

def func(num, k):
    return ''.join(iter_func(num, k))

In earlier Python versions there is no yield from, but you can achieve the same with:

for x in whatever:
    yield x

By the way, you could also maybe simplify a bit by restructuring, especially if you aren't using 3.3 and therefore need the extra code in each case:

subvalues = {'1' : '123', '2': '321'}

...

for item in num:
    yield from iter_func(subvalues.get(item, '1'), k-1)

Another way of saying much the same thing:

import itertools

subvalues = {'1' : '123', '2': '321'}
def iter_func(num, k):
    if k == 0:
        return (num,)
    return itertools.chain.from_iterable(
        iter_func(subvalues.get(item, '1'), k-1)
        for item in num
    )
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Since I'm a beginner in Python I need to search for more information about yield. I didn't expect to change my code that much. But thanks anyway. –  user3129888 Dec 23 '13 at 15:23
    
@user3129888: well, there are other ways to do it so you don't have to look up yield, but I recommend you do :-) For example you could pass a list around the place, and append a value to that list in the place you currently print. You'd still need to join it all together at the end though, and yield is in any case a natural (dare I say "Pythonic") thing to use to produce a sequence of values. –  Steve Jessop Dec 23 '13 at 15:25
    
Ok, thanks! :-) –  user3129888 Dec 23 '13 at 15:29

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