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I would like to know if C# automatically implemented properties, like public static T Prop { get; set; }, are thread-safe or not. Thanks!

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You'd have to define what exactly you mean by "thread safe" in this particular instance, first. –  Pavel Minaev Jan 15 '10 at 21:36
    
By thread-safe I mean, if I write the value in one thread, and another thread tries to read it, could the second thread get a wrong value. –  Miguel Angelo Jan 16 '10 at 13:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

It appears not. This is the decompilation with Reflector:

private static string Test
{
    [CompilerGenerated]
    get
    {
        return <Test>k__BackingField;
    }
    [CompilerGenerated]
    set
    {
        <Test>k__BackingField = value;
    }
}
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That's kind of wrong. .NET's memory model guarantees that writes to them will be atomic and seen by all threads, at least for the regular .NET Framework, and if they are not virtual they will always be inlined. Both are implementation details of the .NET desktop framework and are not guaranteed by the spec, though. –  OverMachoGrande Jan 15 '10 at 20:55
    
er I mean the decompilation is correct, but the way they are implemented guarantees atomicity, at least for integers and reference types (with the obvious caveat that atomicity != thread safety). For longs/doubles/structs/etc., you're on you're on your own, though. –  OverMachoGrande Jan 15 '10 at 20:58
3  
The spec guarantees that things like Int32, float and references are atomic. It doesn't make many guarantees about thread visibility / register caching etc. –  Marc Gravell Jan 15 '10 at 21:03
1  
is that k__BackingField that you decompiled volatile? –  Miguel Angelo Jan 15 '10 at 21:14
8  
As I understand it in this context, "atomic" means that it can't be seen mid-update. For example, double is not guaranteed atomic; if you change a double field from {x} to {y}, another thread could see it after only the first half has been updated - it could get a different number ({z}) that has never existed as a "real" value of the field (huge corruption issue). –  Marc Gravell Jan 15 '10 at 21:23

Section 10.7.4 of the C# specification states:

When a property is specified as an automatically implemented property, a hidden backing field is automatically available for the property, and the accessors are implemented to read from and write to that backing field. The following example:

public class Point {
  public int X { get; set; } // automatically implemented
  public int Y { get; set; } // automatically implemented
}

is equivalent to the following declaration:

public class Point {
  private int x;
  private int y;
  public int X { get { return x; } set { x = value; } }
  public int Y { get { return y; } set { y = value; } }
}

That's what we promise, and that's what you get. The point of auto properties is to do the most basic, simple, cheap thing; if you want to do something fancier then you should write a "real" property.

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5  
Upvoted you for referencing the actual C# specification. –  qes Jan 15 '10 at 23:21

No. You must wrap them in thread-locking mechanisms.

object _lock = new object();
public static Main(string[] args)
{
    lock(_lock)
    {
         Prop = new T();
    }


    T val = null;
    lock(_lock)
    {
         val = Prop;
    }
}
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1  
What is Prop? What is T? –  G-Wiz Jan 15 '10 at 20:53
2  
Prop and T are from the question. –  Amy Jan 15 '10 at 23:43

There is no synchronization provided with automatic properties, including static properties.

If you need full thread safety, you'll want to use your own properties with a backing field, and handle the synchronization yourself.

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For completeness, field-like events do have thread-safety built in, but they are alone in this. Automatically implemented properties do not have any such features. You can, however, do something like:

public static double SomeProp
{   // ### NOT RECOMMENDED ###
    [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)] get;
    [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)] set;
}

The problem with this is that it will lock the Type, which is a bad thing. I would implement my own synchronization for this, personally.

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1  
"bad" for reasons of "marshal-by-bleed" where the Type lock bleeds into other isolated appdomains in the same process... –  x0n Jan 15 '10 at 21:48
1  
It is bad enough just with one app-domain truth be told. –  Marc Gravell Jan 15 '10 at 23:14

I don't believe so. I believe they are just syntatic sugar for:

private static T _prop;
public static T Prop
{
    get { return _prop; }
    set { _prop = value; }
}
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No, they not threadsafe. Static properties just as vulnerable as static fields are to concurrency issues.

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