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I try to understand neural networks

I compose arrays of inputs as

..# ### ### #.#
.## ..# ..# #.#
..# ### ### ###
..# #.. ..# ..#
..# ### ### ..#, etc

desired ouptut I set as digit/10, i.e digit = 5 output = 0.5

the code

require 'ruby-fann'

train = RubyFann::TrainData.new(
  inputs: [
    [0,0,1,0,1,1,0,0,1,0,0,1,0,0,1],
    [1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1],
    [1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1],
    [1,0,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,0,1],
    [1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1],
    [1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1],
    [1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,0,1,0,0],
    [1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1],
    [1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1]
  ],
  desired_outputs: [[0.1],[0.2],[0.3], [0.4], [0.5], [0.6], [0.7], [0.8], [0.9]]
)
fann = RubyFann::Standard.new(
  num_inputs: 15,
  hidden_neurons: [8,4,3,4,1],
  num_outputs: 1
)
fann.train_on_data(train, 100000, 10, 0.1) # 100000 max_epochs, 100 errors between reports and 0.1 desired MSE (mean-squared-error)
outputs = fann.run([0,0,1,0,1,1,0,0,1,0,0,1,0,0,1])
result = outputs.first
abort result.inspect

Outputs for each run script

0.5367386954219215
0.5141728468011051
0.5249739971144654
0.5373135467504666
0.5182686028674102
0.46710004502372293
0.4723526462690119
0.5306690734137796
0.5151398228322749
0.5359153267266001
0.469100790593523
0.4749347798092478
0.5094355973839471
0.5205985468860461
0.5277528652471375
0.4825827561254995

I don't understand why output don't equal 0.1, which totally identical with first input.

What means that values in 0.46 - 0.53 diapason?

UPDATE

I replace 0 with 0.1, and 1 with 0.9

Output

0.4794515462681635
0.5332274595769928
0.4601992972516728
0.427064909364266
0.43466252163025687
0.46931411920827737
0.4455544021835517
0.48051179013023565
0.4798245565677274
0.4479353078492235
0.4646710791032779
0.4887400910135108

Also I add +1 input for zero digit, nothing significantly happened

share|improve this question
    
What's RubyFann? Is that a standard gem? –  Jan Dvorak Dec 23 '13 at 16:02
1  
yes, as I understand its wrapper of C++ Fast Artificial Neural Network Library –  Vyacheslav Loginov Dec 23 '13 at 16:07
    
Maybe you should use floats as the training data? –  Jan Dvorak Dec 23 '13 at 16:11
    
Maybe eight neurons in the first layer aren't enough? Try [10] or something similar. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 23 '13 at 16:14
    
Ok, I will try and update my question –  Vyacheslav Loginov Dec 23 '13 at 16:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Training neural nets is a bit of a dark art. Here, your biggest problem is setting an RMS error target of 0.1 - that means you will accept an average absolute error larger than the differences you are interested in. Setting it lower should help immensely.

Additionally (but less importantly):

  • You do not need quite so many hidden layers. Just enough neurons. From trial-and-error I think your [8,4,3,4,1] is a bit low for this problem (and the last 1 does nothing useful). A value of [30] seems to work - I got this basically by trying a few guesses.

  • Categorisation is usually best done with one 0/1 output per category, and picking the maximum value afterwards. You don't need that though, I tested with your 0.1, 0.2 etc targets, and it works just fine like that. Explanation why separate outputs are better: If your input had some noise, and the network should ideally choose between a 3 and an 8, then an in-between value using a single output might be 0.55 - not very useful, even if you round it the value is basically incorrect. However, with 9 outputs used for categorisation, the outputs for a "3" and an "8" will both be high, and you can either select the marginally higher one, or show with some confidence that the correct value is either a "3" or an "8".

  • The problem you have chosen as your test case may get stuck in a local minima, and you need to adjust momentum and learning rates for better chance of success.

  • Shuffling the training data may also help.

The following changes to your code/params should give something closer to your desired results:

require 'ruby-fann'

train = RubyFann::TrainData.new(
  inputs: [
    [0,0,1,0,1,1,0,0,1,0,0,1,0,0,1], [1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1],
    [1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1], [1,0,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,0,1],
    [1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1], [1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1],
    [1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,0,1,0,0], [1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1],
    [1,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,1]
  ],
  desired_outputs: [ [1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0], [0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
                     [0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0], [0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0],
                     [0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0], [0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0],
                     [0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0], [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0],
                     [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1] ]
)

fann = RubyFann::Standard.new(
  num_inputs: 15,
  hidden_neurons: [30],
  num_outputs: 9
)

fann.learning_rate = 0.5
fann.momentum = 0.5

fann.train_on_data(train, 10000, 1000, 0.001)

outputs = fann.run([0,0,1,0,1,1,0,0,1,0,0,1,0,0,1])
m = outputs.max
puts "Result: #{( outputs.find_index { |x| x == m } ) + 1}"
share|improve this answer

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