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I need to improve the performance of the following code (Intel Ivy Bridge, x64):

unsigned int delta;
unsigned int a[100];
unsigned int b[100];

...

double sum = 0;

for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    sum += (double)b[i]/a[i];

bool possible = delta >= sum;

The bottleneck really is double and makes the execution time 3 times more. a[index] will be anything from 0 to 500m. b[index] will be from 0 to 500.

Q: How are the arrays a and b modified between two calls to this piece of code?

On each call, the only difference will be a[index]++; where 0 <= index < 100 b is always the same. delta also doesn't change.

Due to the fact that the result is compared with another number and stored as boolean, I absolutely need the highest possible accuracy. That's why I used double and not float in first place. As you understand even 1/1b difference will return wrong value, as the result is boolean!

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1  
for one, doubles are twice as big as integer, it makes sense that it is longer to make operations on them –  njzk2 Dec 23 '13 at 19:52
4  
Floating point arithmetic is naturally more complex than integer arithmetic. If you don't need maximum precision, you could try (a) use float instead, (b) try to optimize floating point math by specifying -ffast-math or -Ofast if you compile with g++, (c) redesign your algorithm to use integral types for "fixed point" representation –  leemes Dec 23 '13 at 19:53
11  
i have trouble figuring how 100 operations can take even 10 seconds –  njzk2 Dec 23 '13 at 19:55
5  
@njzk2: I see you have never operated an actual Turing machine. All that tape is tricky to feed. –  Kerrek SB Dec 23 '13 at 19:57
1  
edit: I need high precision because a[0] will be 1 and b[0] 100.000.000 Hugh? How could this be a problem? The ratio of those numbers (which is what you compute) fits perfectly in a float. Floating point representation has its problems when you add or subtract two numbers of very different scale. Multiplication and division is fine. –  leemes Dec 23 '13 at 20:00

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The following code is 16 times faster than the original code on an Intel Core i7-3770 using Apple LLVM 5.0 with “-O3” and is generally more accurate (because it is more likely to add numbers of similar magnitudes, which avoids losing bits in floating-point additions).

Since only one a[i] changes between iterations, we can cache all the quotients. We can also organize the additions into a binary tree and cache most of the sums. Then, when one a[i] changes, we only need to update the sums along a single path of the binary tree.

First, we define an array to hold the quotients and their sums, and we initialize it:

// Define number of elements in base arrays.
#define N 100

// Define size needed by adding sizes of each level of tree.
#define P   (100+50+26+14+8+4+2+1)

// Define array.
double q[P];

// Initialize first level with quotients.
for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
    q[i] = (double) b[i] / a[i];

// For each other level, form sums from two elements of previous level.
for (int b0 = 0, t = N; 1 < t;)
{
    // t is the number of elements in the current level.
    // b0 is the base for the previous level.
    // b1 is the base for the current level.
    int b1 = b0 + t;

    // If t is odd, pad the level with a zero element.
    if (t & 1)
        q[b1++] = 0;

    // Calculate the size of the current level.
    t = (t+1)/2;

    // Calculate each element in the current level from the previous level.
    for (int i = 0; i < t; ++i)
        q[b1+i] = q[b0+2*i+0] + q[b0+2*i+1];

    // Set the base for the next level.
    b0 = b1;
}

Whenever element a[i] changes, we update the stored quotient for it and update the tree:

double C(unsigned int a[], unsigned int b[], double q[], int i)
{
    // Update the stored quotient.
    q[i] = (double) b[i] / a[i];

    // Update the tree, using code similar to above.
    for (int b0 = 0, t = N; 1 < t;)
    {
        int b1 = b0 + t;
        if (t & 1)
            b1++;
        t = (t+1)/2;

        // Calculate the index for the element to update in this level.
        i /= 2;

        // Update the sum that changes in this level.
        q[b1+i] = q[b0+2*i+0] + q[b0+2*i+1];

        b0 = b1;
    }

    // Return the root.
    return q[P-1];
}
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1  
+1; if the utmost accuracy is desired then adding the cached quotients can be done in chunks as well, to avoid the situation where the final few terms added are much smaller in magnitude than the aggregate sum. –  Andrey Dec 23 '13 at 21:04
    
If it was my post's introduction of a sum tree that inspired you to, a few hours later, replace your own post with a tree-based one, would you be so kind as to add a small mention or citation of my post? I would be greatly indebted. –  Iwillnotexist Idonotexist Dec 25 '13 at 8:29

Thing one:

Hardcoding Intel assembly into your program will make it less portable, more brittle, less secure, and generally a terror to work on. This is a task to be avoided unless you need to eke the last ounce of performance out of the bare metal, such as in writing kernel-level code (drivers and schedulers). This is probably not the place for it.

Thing two:

Unless you are like unto a god, you are probably not going to be able to write assembly that runs faster than existing code. C++ contains deep magic, and many routine operations compile down to counterintuitive optimizations that run much more efficiently than the naive solution.

Thing three:

Assembly isn't your problem. double stands for double-precision-floating-point-number, and floating point operations are generally more computationally expensive than integer operations and this bottleneck is inherent to the computation.

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1  
+1 although you don't provide a solution ;) Assembly should really be the last tool to use if you know very well that there is no other thing to be optimized. –  leemes Dec 23 '13 at 20:05

The problem is best solved by considering an algorithm change.

You state that the trivial solution for updating the array (subtracting out the old and adding the new value) is unacceptable because precision is critical. That solution is of time complexity O(u), where u is the number of array updates, and space complexity O(1).

All solutions so far rely on re-summing the entire array, when only one entry in it changes per iteration. This is of time complexity O(un) and space complexity O(1).

But the patently-obvious solution is to re-sum only the "part" of the array that changed! When an element is updated in your array, only one half of the array changed, and only half of that half changed, and only half of that half of that half changed...

My solution is to keep a complete tree of the sums of each sub-array. On each update, I propagate the changed sums from the leafs up, reusing all the summations of subarrays that have been done before on unchanged subtrees. This is O(u log n) in time complexity at the cost of O(n) space complexity.

Code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

/**
 * Controlling variables.
 */

#ifndef REPEAT
#define REPEAT         2260
#endif
#ifndef NAIVE
#define NAIVE          0
#endif
#ifndef PROBLEM
#define PROBLEM        (1<<7)
#endif
#ifndef PRINT_PROGRESS
#define PRINT_PROGRESS 1
#endif


/**
 * Initialize the workspace, returning the initial sum.
 */

static double speedyInit(unsigned* a, unsigned* b, unsigned n, double* w, unsigned N){
    unsigned i, j;
    double*  adbl = w+  N;
    double*  bdbl = w+2*N;

    /**
     * We initialize the workspace with the correct values out to index i
     * and zero(-producing) values from index n to N.
     */

    for(i=0;i<n;i++){
        adbl[i] = a[i];
        bdbl[i] = b[i];
        w[i]    = bdbl[i]/adbl[i];
    }
    for(;i<N;i++){
        adbl[i] = 1.0;
        bdbl[i] = 0.0;
        w[i]    = 0.0;
    }

    /**
     * We in-place and bottom-up construct the "tree" of sums.
     */

    for(i=j=N;i>1;i-=2){/* First-level sums */
        w[--j] = w[i-2] + w[i-1];
    }
    while(--j){/* Subsequent sum levels */
        w[j] = w[2*j] + w[2*j+1];
    }

    /**
     * We return the overall sum, found in w[1].
     */

    return w[1];
}


/**
 * Performs the "A" array update efficiently, returning the new sum.
 */

static double speedyUpd(unsigned* a, double* w, unsigned N, unsigned i){
    unsigned p;
    double   v0, v1;
    double*  adbl = w+  N;
    double*  bdbl = w+2*N;

    /**
     * We increment the two "a" arrays.
     * 
     * NOTE: A double's precision is great enough to losslessly store
     * 32-bit unsigned values.
     */

    a   [i]++;
    adbl[i]++;

    /**
     * We compute the new value at index i and, somewhat wastefully, its "buddy"
     * value at index i^1.
     */

    v0 = bdbl[i  ]/adbl[i  ];
    v1 = bdbl[i^1]/adbl[i^1];

    /**
     * We iteratively propagate the v0+v1 sum "up" the top of the "tree" in log-time.
     * 
     * On each iteration we insert the sum v0+v1 at index p, then set v0 to the
     * value at index p and v1 to the value of its "buddy", index p^1. The parent
     * index of p is then computed and stored in p. 
     */

    p    = (N>>1) + (i>>1);
    while(p){
        v0  =  w[p  ]  =  v0+v1;
        v1  =  w[p^1];
        p  >>= 1;
    }

    /**
     * We return the overall sum, found in w[1].
     */

    return w[1];
}


/**
 * Performs the "A" array update inefficiently, returning the new sum.
 */

static double slowyUpd(unsigned* a, double* w, unsigned N, unsigned i){
    double   sum  = 0;
    double*  adbl = w+  N;
    double*  bdbl = w+2*N;

    a   [i]++;
    adbl[i]++;

    for(i=0; i<N; i++){
        sum += bdbl[i]/adbl[i];
    }

    return sum;
}


/**
 * Requires N a power of two bigger than one.
 * Requires n <= N.
 * Requires workspace w of 3*N doubles.
 */


double speedy(unsigned* a, unsigned* b, unsigned n, double* w, unsigned N){
    int    i = n, cond = 1;
    double sum;
    double delta = 0;


    sum = speedyInit(a, b, n, w, N);


    while(cond){
        /* Do whatever */
        /* ... */
        /* Set i. */
        i = i-1;
        /* ... */
        #if NAIVE
        sum = slowyUpd(a, w, N, rand()%n);
        #else
        sum = speedyUpd(a, w, N, rand()%n);
        #endif
        /* ... */
        int possible = delta >= sum;
        /* ... */
        cond = i > 0;
    }

    return sum;
}

/**
 * Main. Gives example.
 */

int main(void){
    const unsigned n=PROBLEM, N=PROBLEM;
    unsigned a[n], b[n];
    double   w[3*N];
    unsigned i, j;
    double   dummy = 0;

    for(i=0;i<n;i++){
        a[i] = 1;
        b[i] = i;
    }

    speedy(a, b, n, w, N);/* Dummy */

    clock_t clk = -clock();
    for(i=0;i<REPEAT;i++){
        dummy += speedy(a, b, n, w, N);

        #if PRINT_PROGRESS
        putchar('.');
        fflush(stdout);
        #endif
    }
    clk += clock();

    #if PRINT_PROGRESS
    putchar('\n');
    #endif

    printf("dummy = %f, average time %.9f\n", dummy, clk/((double)CLOCKS_PER_SEC*REPEAT));
}

Usage

Assuming you put this in a file called upd_avg.c, the commands

gcc -O3 upd_avg.c -o upd_avg -DPRINT_PROGRESS=0 -DNAIVE=0 -DREPEAT=2260 -DPROBLEM=128
gcc -O3 upd_avg.c -o upd_avg -DPRINT_PROGRESS=0 -DNAIVE=1 -DREPEAT=2260 -DPROBLEM=128

will compile, respectively, my O(u log n) algorithm and everybody else's naive O(un) algorithm.

Results

For the case where u is the same as n, the difference is as clear as day (or mergesort vs. bubblesort):

                 |         Average time/run (s)
     Size        |    -DNAIVE=0     |    -DNAIVE=1
_________________|_____________________________________
 -DPROBLEM=2     |   0.000000094    |   0.000000071
 -DPROBLEM=4     |   0.000000196    |   0.000000180
 -DPROBLEM=8     |   0.000000482    |   0.000000809
 -DPROBLEM=16    |   0.000000989    |   0.000002556
 ...             |   ...            |   ...
 -DPROBLEM=128   |   0.000007623    |   0.000150181
 -DPROBLEM=256   |   0.000016713    |   0.000590156
 -DPROBLEM=512   |   0.000037765    |   0.002338671
 -DPROBLEM=1024  |   0.000077752    |   0.009324281
 -DPROBLEM=2048  |   0.000167924    |   0.037225660
 -DPROBLEM=4096  |   0.000343608    |   0.146875721 (*)
 ...             |   ...            |   ...
 -DPROBLEM=65536 |   0.007426288    |  21.264978500 (**)
 ...             |   ...            |  We haaaveee liiiffffttttooofffff!!!!!!!

(*) -DREPEAT=226 rather than 2260. (**) -DREPEAT=2 rather than 2260, CPU fan speed doubled.

Internals

My speedy() function accepts unsigned int arrays a and b of any size n >= 2. However, it also requires the allocation of workspace memory, of size 3*N where N must be a power of two, preferably equal to n rounded to the next higher power of two.

The function speedyInit() sets up the tree of sums and thereby computes the initial one, which is at the root of the workspace, defined as element w[1] for implementation simplicity.

The function speedyUpd() is the one that implements my logarithmic-time sum propagation. The while loop inside it implements elegantly the walk up the tree from the leaves. It is enabled by -DNAIVE=0.

The function slowyUpd() is the naive implementation. It is enabled by -DNAIVE=1, and is so named because it's slow.

Notes

N.B. While attempting to benchmark my code I found that GCC's fold and DCE is surprisingly good at deleting code with no effect, or running a function only once.

N.B. I find it somewhat odd that precision is critical, yet you add sequentially numbers of potentially wildly different magnitudes without a whiff of Kahan's summation algorithm in sight.

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Comments by OP suggest that the loop in his original snippet is run over and over, but between runs, only one entry of a changes, and no entries of b change. So:

unsigned int delta;
unsigned int a[100];
unsigned int b[100];

// ...

double sum = 0;

// run ONLY ONCE
for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    sum += (double)b[i]/a[i];

// ...

// run during successive iterations, when a[index] changes
sum -= (double)b[index]/a[index];
a[index]++;
sum += (double)b[index]/a[index];

bool possible = delta >= sum;

// ...

Edit: (remark to OP) it seems from the conversation in the OP comment thread that OP has a problem much simpler than his post initially suggests. So, OP, I really think you'll end up getting a much better answer from someone if you just post what the purpose of this code is, because there might be a better way of solving your actual problem. See http://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem.

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2  
The best (straight forward) solution I can think of, yet it suffers from a problem (OP needs to tell us if it is a problem in his case): Dividing one entry from a sum over and over again accumulates floating point errors. The transformation is mathematically correct, but for float this will give a different result than the original code. –  leemes Dec 23 '13 at 20:25

This code computes the sum about twice as fast as the original code on an Intel Core i7-3770, compiled with Apple LLVM 5.0 using “-O3”:

#define L   50

double sum = 0;

double numerator = 0, denominator = 1;

for (int i = 0; i < N; i += L)
{
    for (int j = i; j < i+L && j < N; ++j)
    {
        numerator = numerator * a[j] + denominator * b[j];
        denominator *= a[j];
    }
    sum += numerator / denominator;
    numerator = 0;
    denominator = 1;
}

It works by avoiding divisions, which are time-consuming operations. Instead, it simply adds fractions without reducing them.

I included a second loop that can be used to consolidate the accumulating fractions if they may grow so large that they overflow the double range. That is not necessary in this case because each a[i] is at most 500, and there are at most 100 of them, so the greatest accumulated denominator is 500100 which is within the double range. Since each b[i] is also at most 500, the accumulated numerator cannot be more than (2•500)100, which is also within range.

If other parameters were involved, L could be set so that the number of iterations between consolidations of the sum is limited to prevent overflow.

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You could change the algorithm to 'overestimate' the sum, using lower precision (e.g. fixed point arithmetic), and only when this overestimate proves bigger than delta, calculating in higher precision.

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Good idea but it depends on how frequently delta is exceeded. If this is expected to be an infrequent occurrence, there may be gains to be made with integer math. –  Iwillnotexist Idonotexist Dec 24 '13 at 17:05

You need double precision because you have a boolean result? There is no such rule. I would understand that you want 'predictable' results.

Precision of double calculations is not really predictable, either, so I really wonder if you don't want to revert to fixed point arithmetic (by e.g. multiplying all your inputs by 216 or so). Since your smallest a/b is 1/500, and your biggest a/b is 500. This means that with a dynamic range of 5002, you're set. The biggest absolute error you can make is 'small enough'.

That could be done with two small functions:

int toFixedPoint(int a, int b) {
    return (a<<16)/b;
}

int fromFixedPoint(int q) {
   return q >> 16;
}

Since your array only changes very little by very little, you may want to rewrite the equations so that you can express them differentially:

int nextTotal(previousTotal, changedIndex) {
  // find the changed index i
  return previousTotal + toFixedPoint(1, b[i]);
}

And in a loop:

static total = 0;

int i = changedIndex(a);
total = nextTotal(total, i);
if (delta <= fromFixedPoint(total)) {
   ...
}

This will reduce the number of computations by a factor 100 :)

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