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I'm working with Tkinter and I'm trying to create an attribute called wordlist for a main object that belongs to the Main1 class.

This is the Main1 class:

class Main1(Instructions):
    def __init__(self, master, wordlist):
        super(Main1,self).__init__(master)
        self.wordlist = self.readwords()
        self.textbox.insert(0.0,self.wordlist)
    def create_wdgts(self):

        mainlbl = Label(self,text="Tänk på ett ord!")
        mainlbl.grid(row=0,column=2)

        self.textbox = Text(self, width = 50, height = 5, wrap = WORD)
        self.textbox.grid(column=2,row=1)

        self.backbttn = Button(self,text="Tillbaka")
        self.backbttn["command"] = self.back
        self.backbttn.grid(column=5,row=0)

        self.pointentry = Entry(self)
        self.pointentry.grid(column=2, row=2)
        self.pointlbl = Label(self,text = "Poäng:")
        self.pointlbl.grid(column = 1, row= 2)
        self.pointbttn = Button(self, text="skicka poäng")
        self.pointbttn.grid(row= 2, column = 3)
        self.pointbttn["command"]= self.pointhndlr()

        self.crrctlbl = Label(self, text = "Rätt ord:")
        self.crrctlbl.grid(column = 1, row = 3)
        self.crrctentry = Entry(self)
        self.crrctentry.grid(column = 2, row= 3)
        self.crrctbttn = Button(self, text="skicka rätt ord")
        self.crrctbttn.grid(row= 3, column = 3)

        self.yesbttn = Button(self, text="Ja")
        self.yesbttn.grid(row = 4, column=4)

        self.nobttn = Button(self, text = "Nej")
        self.nobttn.grid(row=4, column=5)

    def readwords(self):
        """Returns list with all words in words.txt"""
        file = codecs.open("words.txt","r","utf8")
        wordlist = []
        for word in file:
            wordlist.append(word.strip())
        return wordlist

    def guess(self):
        self.guesstemp = random.choice(wordlist)
        self.textbox.insert(0.0,"Ange poäng för ordet '"+guesstemp+"': ")

    def pointhndlr(self):
        pointtemp = self.pointentry.get()
        self.pointentry.delete(0)
        self.wordlist = remvwords(self.wordlist,self.guesstemp,self.pointtemp,self.guesslist,self.pointlist)

I hope I don't need to post more of the program as this is already a lot of code. Anyway, I get an error message saying that my Main1 object has no wordlist attribute. Why? I created it in the init method!

Grateful for all help.

Sahand

EDIT: The error is traced back to the last line, where I try to change the value of self.wordlist. The error message is:

Exception in Tkinter callback
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/3.3/lib/python3.3/tkinter/__init__.py", line 1475, in __call__
    return self.func(*args)
  File "/Users/SahandZarrinkoub/Documents/graphics.py", line 294, in main1
    main1.guess()
  File "/Users/SahandZarrinkoub/Documents/graphics.py", line 364, in guess
    self.textbox.insert(0.0,"Ange poäng för ordet '"+guesstemp+"': ")
NameError: global name 'guesstemp' is not defined
share|improve this question
    
Where do you get that error? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Dec 23 '13 at 19:58
    
in the last line. –  user3128156 Dec 23 '13 at 19:59
1  
Show how you create the object. Most likely your __init__ does not run. And why are you passing a wordlist parameter to __init__ that you ignore? –  David Heffernan Dec 23 '13 at 20:00
1  
My guess is that calling the base constructor will invoke create_wdgts, which will call self.pointhndlr. Note that when you assign self.pointbttn["command"] = self.pointhndlr(), you're not making that button call that method when you click it, instead you're actually calling that method as part of that assignment, assigning whatever it returns (which seems to be nothing, aka None), to the command. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Dec 23 '13 at 20:01
3  
Instead of pasting a whole bunch of mostly-irrelevant code and leaving out lots of other code, please strip your code down to a minimal, complete example that demonstrates the problem. See SSCCE for more guidance. –  abarnert Dec 23 '13 at 20:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The reason here is that this:

super(Main1,self).__init__(master)

will in turn call this:

def create_wdgts(self):

which will in turn do this:

self.pointbttn["command"]= self.pointhndlr()

This does not assign the function self.pointhndlr to self.pointbttn["command"], instead it calls self.pointhndlr, and assigns the result to self.pointbttn["command"].

The solution: remove the parenthesis:

self.pointbttn["command"]= self.pointhndlr
share|improve this answer

The way you call super.init is wrong.

You used:

super(Main1,self).__init__(master)

You should use:

super(Main1,self).__init__(self, master)

The way you called it, the object you are creating is not initialized as an Instructions instance. Instead, the master object gets re-initialized or re-cast as an Instructions instance.

share|improve this answer
    
The call to super is perfectly right (assuming Instruction.__init__() takes masteras argument of course). Please check your facts. –  bruno desthuilliers Dec 23 '13 at 20:38
    
If you're lucky, this "fix" will just raise a TypeError when you try to construct a Main1 because you passed one too many arguments. Otherwise, it'll construct a Main1 whose parent window is itself, which will lead to disastrous and painful-to-debug problems. –  abarnert Dec 23 '13 at 20:41

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