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I am trying to clear a std::queue using the example in http://stackoverflow.com/a/709161/837451 via a swap. However, it doesn't seem to work with a lambda comparator due to the "deleted function" error.

Minimal working failing example:

#include <queue>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;
int main(){
    typedef pair<int,float> ifpair;
    auto comp = []( ifpair a,  ifpair b ) { return a.second > b.second; };
    typedef priority_queue< ifpair , vector<ifpair>, decltype( comp ) > t_npq;
    t_npq npq( comp );
    //do something with npq. finish using it (without emptying it) and clear for next round
    t_npq empty( comp );
    swap(npq , empty);
}

Compile with

g++ -std=c++11 /tmp/test.cpp -o /tmp/o

And I get the following error:

/usr/include/c++/4.8/bits/move.h:176:11: error: use of deleted function ‘main()::__lambda0& main()::__lambda0::operator=(const main()::__lambda0&)’
   __a = _GLIBCXX_MOVE(__b);
       ^
/tmp/test.cpp:6:18: note: a lambda closure type has a deleted copy assignment operator

g++ -v

Using built-in specs.
COLLECT_GCC=g++
COLLECT_LTO_WRAPPER=/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.8/lto-wrapper
Target: x86_64-linux-gnu
Configured with: ../src/configure -v --with-pkgversion='Ubuntu/Linaro 4.8.1-10ubuntu9' --with-bugurl=file:///usr/share/doc/gcc-4.8/README.Bugs --enable-languages=c,c++,java,go,d,fortran,objc,obj-c++ --prefix=/usr --program-suffix=-4.8 --enable-shared --enable-linker-build-id --libexecdir=/usr/lib --without-included-gettext --enable-threads=posix --with-gxx-include-dir=/usr/include/c++/4.8 --libdir=/usr/lib --enable-nls --with-sysroot=/ --enable-clocale=gnu --enable-libstdcxx-debug --enable-libstdcxx-time=yes --enable-gnu-unique-object --enable-plugin --with-system-zlib --disable-browser-plugin --enable-java-awt=gtk --enable-gtk-cairo --with-java-home=/usr/lib/jvm/java-1.5.0-gcj-4.8-amd64/jre --enable-java-home --with-jvm-root-dir=/usr/lib/jvm/java-1.5.0-gcj-4.8-amd64 --with-jvm-jar-dir=/usr/lib/jvm-exports/java-1.5.0-gcj-4.8-amd64 --with-arch-directory=amd64 --with-ecj-jar=/usr/share/java/eclipse-ecj.jar --enable-objc-gc --enable-multiarch --disable-werror --with-arch-32=i686 --with-abi=m64 --with-multilib-list=m32,m64,mx32 --with-tune=generic --enable-checking=release --build=x86_64-linux-gnu --host=x86_64-linux-gnu --target=x86_64-linux-gnu
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.8.1 (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.8.1-10ubuntu9) 

I'm kind of curious what exactly is going on here but more importantly I would really like to know how to make this work.

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Works on my machine! What compiler (and version) are you using? Idem for the standard library implementation. –  rightfold Dec 23 '13 at 20:30
    
Suboptimal quick fix: use std::function<bool(ifpair,ifpair)> –  leemes Dec 23 '13 at 20:31
    
Do you really want the values to comp passed in by value instead of by ref or const ref? –  woolstar Dec 23 '13 at 20:33
    
@woolstar: Probably yes. Those are very small values which are cheap to copy. –  Ben Voigt Dec 23 '13 at 20:35
    
In addition to my previous comment: or even bool(*)(ifpair,ifpair); that should work and doesn't add the overhead of std::function –  leemes Dec 23 '13 at 20:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

While the result of a lambda expression is move constructible it isn't necessarily move assignable and certainly not copyable. I would just bypass the problem by using a std::reference_wrapper<decltype(comp)> for the comparator object:

typedef pair<int,float> ifpair;
auto comp = []( ifpair a,  ifpair b ) { return a.second > b.second; };
typedef priority_queue< ifpair , vector<ifpair>,
                        std::reference_wrapper<decltype( comp ) >> t_npq;
t_npq npq( std::ref(comp) );
t_npq empty( std::ref(comp) );
swap(npq , empty);

Since the full type information of the lambda expression is retained by the reference wrapper, this should work even if the closure isn't empty and, where viable, it should be possible to inline the function.

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Wow, compared with the function pointer I'm getting a ~10% speedup in my real code. It's -O2 so I imagine that's the inlining. –  mmdanziger Dec 23 '13 at 21:11
    
@mmdanziger: I would guess that it is down to inlining and avoiding an indirection. It would be interesting to see the performance with a custom function object, too... –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 23 '13 at 21:15
    
+1 I was just thinking about std::function. However, while I mean that +1, I think the answer would be more complete if it notes that a lambda only may have an implicitly declared move constructor. As far as I can see nothing is said (in the standard) about move assignment operator. :-( –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 23 '13 at 21:19
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: I have extended the answer. The approach usinf std::ref() doesn't any of these operations. –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 23 '13 at 21:27

Have you tried to use std::function?

#include <queue>
#include <vector>
#include <functional>
using namespace std;
int main(){
    typedef pair<int,float> ifpair;
    std::function< bool ( ifpair, ifpair )> comp = []( ifpair a,  ifpair b ) { return a.second > b.second; };
    typedef priority_queue< ifpair , vector<ifpair>, decltype( comp ) > t_npq;
    t_npq npq( comp );
    //do something with npq. finish using it (without emptying it) and clear for next round
    t_npq empty( comp );
    swap(npq , empty);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That's a really expensive solution for a dirt-cheap problem. –  Kerrek SB Dec 23 '13 at 20:37

Lambdas aren't assignable – 5.1.2/19:

The closure type associated with a lambda-expression has a deleted default constructor and a deleted copy assignment operator.

The swap of the containers wants to assign the comparators, too, so that doesn't work.

However, you can easily make it work by converting the stateless lambda to a function pointer first:

bool (*p)(ifpair, ifpair) = [](ifpair a, ifpair b) { return a.second > b.second; };

Now use:

priority_queue<ifpair, vector<ifpair>, bool(*)(ifpair, ifpair)>

(You might want to introduce a typedef for the function type: using comp_type = bool(iftype, iftype), and then use comp_type * everywhere.)

share|improve this answer
    
Calling through a lambda can generally be inlined. Calling through a pointer generally can't be inlined. –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 23 '13 at 20:40
    
@DietmarKühl: Interesting. Maybe a self-written functor is needed if that's an issue. –  Kerrek SB Dec 23 '13 at 20:44
    
That's exactly what I tried to solve in my answer. ;) –  leemes Dec 23 '13 at 20:49
    
@leemes: although I think I'd write the function object, I think using std::reference_wrapper<...> avoids the need to write the function while retaining the capability to inline the function (see my answer :-) –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 23 '13 at 21:02
    
@DietmarKühl: Very nice. –  Kerrek SB Dec 23 '13 at 21:12

As the compile error indicates, lambda objects aren't assignable. You can use a different type of functor for the queue but still write it as a labmda:

  1. Use std::function<bool(ifpair,ifpair)>: http://ideone.com/HZywoV

    But this adds (probably noticable) overhead due to some more indirections in the implementation of std::function but I guess this heavily depends on the implementation of the standard library and the compiler optimizations. Might be the nicest solution regarding how the code looks though.

  2. Use a function pointer bool(*)(ifpair,ifpair): http://ideone.com/ZhFq3C

    This should not suffer from any overhead compared to std::function but to your current solution, since there might be some compiler optimizations done to your lambda code which are then not possible (i.e. inlining it into the rest of the std::queue code which for example eliminates copying the two pairs). Using function pointers looks pretty old-school though.

  3. Use a custom functor class which can be as simple as: http://ideone.com/9pcQFc

    template<typename Pair>
    struct GreaterBySecond {
        bool operator()(Pair a, Pair b) const {
            return a.second > b.second;
        }
    };
    

    This should eliminate all overhead discussed above. I'd prefer this if performance matters.

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