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I'm using SQLAlchemy 0.8.4 with PostgreSQL 9.2.

I've got three simple models: Account, Address, and CreditCard. Both Address and CreditCard have a required Account association. Address has an optional CreditCard association. I'm trying to enforce a constraint such that a CreditCard can only be attached to an Address if they have the same Account.

The problem I'm having is that instead of raising an IntegrityError when I try to associate an Address with a CreditCard having a different account, SQLAlchemy is silently changing the Address's account_id to match the CreditCard's.

Here are the models:

class CreditCard(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'credit_card'

    id = Column('id', INTEGER(), nullable=False, primary_key=True)
    account_id = Column('account_id', INTEGER(), ForeignKey('account.id'), nullable=False)
    card_number = Column('card_number', TEXT(), nullable=False)

    account = relationship("Account")


class Address(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'address'

    id = Column('id', INTEGER(), nullable=False, primary_key=True)
    account_id = Column('account_id', INTEGER(), ForeignKey('account.id'), nullable=False)
    credit_card_id = Column('credit_card_id', INTEGER(), nullable=True)

    __table_args__ = (
        ForeignKeyConstraint(['credit_card_id', 'account_id'], ['credit_card.id', 'credit_card.account_id']),
    )

    account = relationship("Account")
    credit_card = relationship("CreditCard")

The ForeignKeyConstraint matches a multi-column constraint in the database:

CREATE TABLE address (
    id SERIAL NOT NULL UNIQUE,
    account_id INTEGER NOT NULL REFERENCES account(id),
    credit_card_id INTEGER NULL,
    FOREIGN KEY (credit_card_id, account_id) REFERENCES credit_card(id, account_id)
);

The following is code to interact with the database:

account1 = Account(name="account 1")
db.add(account1)
cc = CreditCard(account=account1, card_number="1234")
db.add(cc)
account2 = Account(name="account 2")
db.add(account2)
address = Address(account=account2)
db.add(address)
db.commit()

print "before cc.account_id = %d" % cc.account_id
print "before address.account_id = %d" % address.account_id

address.credit_card = cc
db.add(address)
db.commit()

print "after cc.account_id = %d" % cc.account_id
print "after address.account_id = %d" % address.account_id

When run, it outputs:

before cc.account_id = 13
before address.account_id = 14
after cc.account_id = 13
after address.account_id = 13

Here's a gist of the full Python code and a gist of the full schema.

What I expect (and want) is that trying to assign address.credit_card = cc will raise an IntegrityError (or some other failure). What instead happens is that it just changes the address's account_id behind the scenes.

This is really unintuitive behavior. Anyone know how to prevent it?

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